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BNSFMike
Posts: 75
Member Since: ‎01-14-2011
Message 1 of 13 (8,220 Views)
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Clean Install & Recovery Partition

If I do a clean install of Windows 7 will the HP recovery information still remain on the Recovery D: partition? And will the HP Recovery Manager screen still come up if doing an F11 on boot up?

The Windows 7 disc I have is 3.02GB. The 3 recovery discs I made are 4.21GB, 3.85GB & 3.45GB. Total is 11.51GB. What the heck takes up the extra 8GB on the recovery discs?

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Hanspuppa
Posts: 4,494
Member Since: ‎09-04-2009
Message 2 of 13 (8,197 Views)

Re: Clean Install & Recovery Partition

[ Edited ]

BNSFMike wrote: If I do a clean install of Windows 7 will the HP recovery information still remain on the Recovery D: partition? And will the HP Recovery Manager screen still come up if doing an F11 on boot up? The Windows 7 disc I have is 3.02GB. The 3 recovery discs I made are 4.21GB, 3.85GB & 3.45GB. Total is 11.51GB. What the heck takes up the extra 8GB on the recovery discs?

Hello BNSFMike, If you perform a clean install of Windows 7, the D: HP Recovery Restore partition should still remain on the hard drive unless you choose to delete it.

 

Since the Windows 7 installation creates a 100 MB setup partition that contains setup files and the boot manager, I am not sure the F-11 option would still work, since it uses some data from the original Master Boot Record (MBR) to access the D: partition.

 

If you wanted to perform a HP Recovery Restore at some point, you could use the 3 HP Recovery Restore disk set to put your system back as it was when shipped. These HP Recovery Restore Disk set would repartition the hard drive including the D: partition, and create a new Master Boot Record.

 

The added data on the 3 HP Recovery Restore disk set are all the applications in addition to the operating system that was shipped with your system. The Windows 7 disk only has the operating system.

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BNSFMike
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Member Since: ‎01-14-2011
Message 3 of 13 (8,160 Views)

Re: Clean Install & Recovery Partition

Hanspuppa,

Does this 100 MB setup partition get assigned another drive letter, or does it get deleted after installation?

If I understand this correctly, a clean install of Windows 7 will affect other areas of the hard drive outside of the C: partition. And even though the D: recovery partition is still intact it may not be accessible. Is this correct?

Will Windows 7 automatically install to the C: partition?

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Hanspuppa
Posts: 4,494
Member Since: ‎09-04-2009
Message 4 of 13 (8,144 Views)

Re: Clean Install & Recovery Partition


BNSFMike wrote: Hanspuppa, Does this 100 MB setup partition get assigned another drive letter, or does it get deleted after installation? If I understand this correctly, a clean install of Windows 7 will affect other areas of the hard drive outside of the C: partition. And even though the D: recovery partition is still intact it may not be accessible. Is this correct? Will Windows 7 automatically install to the C: partition?

Hello BNSFMike, The 100 MB setup/boot manager partition does not receive an assigned drive letter. It is somewhat hidden, and cannot be seen in Windows Explorer. You can see it in the Administrative Tools, Storage section in the Control Panel. It does not get deleted after the Windows 7 installation since it does contain the boot manager.

 

It has been suggested that you can delete this 100 MB partition, but the system will not boot since it would have no boot manager. To overcome this issue, you can insert the Windows 7 disk in the optical drive and boot the system and let the Windows 7 disk repair the Master Boot Record (MBR). Windows 7 would then boot to the drive or partition it was installed on. Since this partition is only 100 MBs in capacity, it would be best left on the hard drive.

 

I had my first hard drive failure ever, last night. I replaced the Western Digital VelociRaptor 300 GB C: drive with a spare Seagate 500 GB hard drive, and reimaged the Seagate with the WD VelociRaptor hard drive image, and the system would not boot and gave me an error that it did not find a boot manager. I just inserted the Windows 7 disk in the optical drive and booted and selected to repair the Startup, and it repaired (replcaed) the boot manager and the system booted normally using the Seagate hard drive. The Western Digital is on it's way back to WD for a replacement. I can see a degrade in the system performance with the Seagate hard drive.

 

Windows 7 will create the 100 MB partition but leave the other partitions intact. The D: partition most likely would not be accessable since the Master Boot Record (MBR) will be replaced. The original MBR had the data that was needed for the F-11 process to be able to be used. It would no longer be available after the Windows 7 install.

 

Windows 7 will install on any drive or partition that is available in the drives or partitions in the window that show all the drives/partitions that are available, but it will assign the C: label to the drive or partition it installs on.

 

If for some reason, you need to go back to the HP Recovery Restore, you could always use you HP Recovery Restore disk to put the system back as it was when shipped. These disk would recreate the D: Recovery partition and the Master Boot Record so the F-11 key could acces the D: partition.

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BNSFMike
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Message 5 of 13 (8,117 Views)

Re: Clean Install & Recovery Partition

Hanspuppa,

Sorry to hear about your hard drive failure.

You mentioned that you can insert the Windows 7 disc & let it boot and repair the Master Boot Record. I’m presuming most people are not going to buy Windows 7 if it is already on their PC. If you do not have a Windows 7 disc, will using the HP Recovery Discs do the same thing?

If the HP Recovery disc(s) can repair the MBR, would this also restore access to the D: partition? IOW the original MBR had the data needed for the F11 process & access to the D: partition. Does it follow that if the original MBR is restored then you would again  have access to F11 and the D: partition? Does that make sense?

If a clean install of Windows 7 prevents access to the D: partition, does it make any sense to keep the D: partition?

Regents Professor
Hanspuppa
Posts: 4,494
Member Since: ‎09-04-2009
Message 6 of 13 (8,114 Views)

Re: Clean Install & Recovery Partition

[ Edited ]

BNSFMike wrote: Hanspuppa, Sorry to hear about your hard drive failure. You mentioned that you can insert the Windows 7 disc & let it boot and repair the Master Boot Record. I’m presuming most people are not going to buy Windows 7 if it is already on their PC. If you do not have a Windows 7 disc, will using the HP Recovery Discs do the same thing? If the HP Recovery disc(s) can repair the MBR, would this also restore access to the D: partition? IOW the original MBR had the data needed for the F11 process & access to the D: partition. Does it follow that if the original MBR is restored then you would again  have access to F11 and the D: partition? Does that make sense? If a clean install of Windows 7 prevents access to the D: partition, does it make any sense to keep the D: partition?


Hello BNSFMike, I was a little disappointed in the WD VelociRaptor hard drive failure, especially since I personally have never had a hard drive failure. But that is not the norm. I have changed hundreds for others, so why I have been so lucky up to last week, I can't explain. But I don't dwell on these sorts of things. Just deal with them and go right on as if it didn't happen. The WD VelociRaptor is still under warranty for two more years. I just had to pay to send it back, which is normal procedure for most RMA products.

 

You would need to have a separate Windows 7 DVD to perform a repair of the Startup. I purchased a Retail version to install on a home built system when Windows 7 was first released. The HP Recover Restore Disk would not give you this capability as far as I know.

If you use the HP Recovery Restore Disk to restore the system, they will create a new D: partition, and restore the original MBR, just as it was when shipped. Even though it would not be accessable if you performed a clean Windows 7 x64 installation, you could leave the D: partition intact, although it could not be used to restore the system using the F-11 method. It would essentially, just be taking up hard drive capacity.

 

As long as you have, and keep up with the HP Recovery Restore Disk, there would really be no reason I can think of to keep this D: partition. If you ever wanted to go back to the original software and operating system, you could always use the HP Recovery Disk to accomplish this.

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BNSFMike
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Member Since: ‎01-14-2011
Message 7 of 13 (8,094 Views)

Re: Clean Install & Recovery Partition

Hanspuppa,

 

I never dealt with multiple partitions before. And the last 2 PC's came with actual discs. So this is new territory for me.

 

Thanks for all the information.

 

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BNSFMike
Posts: 75
Member Since: ‎01-14-2011
Message 8 of 13 (8,035 Views)

Re: Clean Install & Recovery Partition

Hanspuppa,

 

Since a clean install of  Windows 7 will render the D: partition useless, is there an option when doing a clean install to eliminate the D: partiton and/or format the whole hard drive into just the C: drive?

 

Regents Professor
Hanspuppa
Posts: 4,494
Member Since: ‎09-04-2009
Message 9 of 13 (8,026 Views)

Re: Clean Install & Recovery Partition


BNSFMike wrote: Hanspuppa, Since a clean install of  Windows 7 will render the D: partition useless, is there an option when doing a clean install to eliminate the D: partiton and/or format the whole hard drive into just the C: drive?

Hello BNSFMike, You can delete the D: Recovery Restore partition during the Windows 7 installation process.

 

When you get to the point where you see the window with the hard drive partitions in the window, just highlight the D: partition, the one that is about 8-15 GBs in capacity, and below the window look for Delete. Select Delete and this should delete the D: partition.

 

You should also see the 100 MB setup partition and the larger C: partition. Do not delete the 100 MB setup partition. Highlight the larger C: partition and select to Delete this partition also. This larger partition will then show as unallocated space. Then with the unallocated partition highlighted, select New and create a new partition on the unallocated space. The select Format, and the C: partition should then be formatted, and just continue with the Windows 7 installation.

 

This should make all the hard drive available in the C: partition and the D: Recovery Restore partition would no longer be there. Again, be certain you do not do anything with the 100 MB setup partition, as it would cause the system to not boot when the Windows 7 installation completes.

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BNSFMike
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Member Since: ‎01-14-2011
Message 10 of 13 (7,985 Views)

Re: Clean Install & Recovery Partition

Hanspuppa,

 

Thanks for the information. I'm still nosing around the bloatware & trying to decide if I should just delete some/all of it, or wipe out all of it & do a clean install of Windows 7. On other computers I have always had to delete whatever I could. But this time I have a legit Windows 7 disc so I could do a clean install. Basically do I want to take the time & examine & make sure every piece of bloatware gets deleted, or wipe it all clean & then wish I could have kept one or two items. So I'm trying out & playing with the various includes apps to see if I would really use them.

 

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