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Intern
LemonPeeler
Posts: 23
Member Since: ‎01-10-2010
Message 1 of 8 (8,783 Views)

Intel Wireless Display

How come HP has so few laptops supporting the Intel Wireless Display feature?

 

This wonderful feature allows the user to wirelessly display their laptop screen on any large flatscreen television as if it were a second monitor.  When Intel Wireless Display is incorporated into the laptop, the user can wirelessly display their laptop screen in full 1080p HD by simply connecting the proper Netgear receiver to their television using an HDMI or composite connection.

 

As such, the user can display laptop content on the big screen television such as movies, videos, slideshows, pictures, internet sites, spreadsheets, documents, or anything else you can display on your laptop.  This is a wonderful feature for both business and home use that allows a large group or family to easily view a presentation.  

 

Does anyone know if HP will be incorporating this technology into upcoming laptops?  Many other brands have incorporated this technology and it would be a pity to be forced to shift from HP in order to enjoy these features.

Intern
MartyH
Posts: 36
Member Since: ‎08-08-2010
Message 2 of 8 (8,759 Views)

Re: Intel Wireless Display

Hi LemonPeeler,

  

Intel Wireless Display is quite good, but some definite improvements are needed.

 

You said: 

"As such, the user can display laptop content on the big screen television such as movies, videos, slideshows, pictures, internet sites, spreadsheets, documents, or anything else you can display on your laptop."  

 

Here's a disclaimer from Intel:

"Due to a small delay between the laptop and TV, highly interactive applications may be difficult to use. Also, as an unprotected display, content that  asserts output protection, such as DVD and Blu-ray discs, will not play."

 

In a nutshell, some games have a delay or lag time that makes them difficult to play; most copyprotected DVD's will not play.

 

I bought a device for under $20 from Amazon that displays everything on my large screen TV ... a 15 foot HDMI cable.  I can sit in a comfortable chair with my laptop and the whole family can enjoy watching the TV.  Very low tech,  but it can do some things that IWD can't do.

  

Marty

_________________________________


dm4t  i5-430M  4GB-RAM  IntelGraphics

Intern
LemonPeeler
Posts: 23
Member Since: ‎01-10-2010
Message 3 of 8 (8,699 Views)

Re: Intel Wireless Display

[ Edited ]

Hi Marty,

 

Thank you for the feedback, it was most helpful.  Though both humorous and sad, at the same time, you nailed one great consideration - until a wireless connection can compete with the cost, simplicity, and effectiveness of a menial cable, it will have an uphill battle to widespread adoption.  Furthermore, the industry complicates this simple issue by problems that apparently arise when displaying encrypted downloads or streams on the secondary monitor (both with HDMI and wireless, I understand).  What is so hard about simply allowing the user to display their laptop content on a larger screen?

 

Either way, here is a helpful PC Magazine review on the new Intel Wireless Display technology (WiDi-2) which apparently overcomes a few of the drawbacks associated with the first version that you mentioned:  http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2375102,00.asp

 

This technology is compelling, because of the low cost.  Many other products such as Google TV, Apple TV, HP Wireless TV Connect, and others are expensive and have drawbacks that even a simple cable does not have, as you so aptly mentioned above.  I think our major players are more interested in introducing expensive products to enhance their revenue stream than in providing simple, affordable utility to the user.

 

Unfortunately, I am still a little confused as to how the technology is implemented.  Some say that a laptop has to specifically have the Wireless Display (WiDi) technology engineered into the laptop, regardless of which CPU chip is integrated, and must display the WiDi logo.  On the other hand, others say that any laptop with the new generation Intel i-Core 3, 5, or 7 chips already have native support for the Intel Wireless Display ( WiDi-2) feature without additional considerations.

 

Do you, or does anyone else, have any further information that will enlighten users?  Is this feature a native feature to the new generation I-Core chips or not?  Does the chip require supporting laptop architecture to be active or not?

Intern
MartyH
Posts: 36
Member Since: ‎08-08-2010
Message 4 of 8 (8,677 Views)

Re: Intel Wireless Display

Hi LemonPeeler,

 

Thanks for the URL about the PCMag article. Interesting reading. Close, but still no cigar:

 

"WiDi 2 is not ready for mass adoption. Playing back protected content, whether it's a Blu-ray or DVD movie, is still a limitation of WiDi. It can't support HDCP, the same encryption specification that allows HDMI cables to stream protected content from your laptop to an HDTV. But Intel hopes to fix this in the near future with a service called Insider."

 

Here's some "What do I need?" info straight from Intel 

 

http://www.intel.com/consumer/products/technology/wirelessdisplay.htm 

 

Marty

_________________________________


dm4t  i5-430M  4GB-RAM  IntelGraphics

Intern
LemonPeeler
Posts: 23
Member Since: ‎01-10-2010
Message 5 of 8 (8,661 Views)

Re: Intel Wireless Display

Hello Marty,

 

Thanks for the additional Intel link.  From what they describe, it appears the feature is not simply built-in as an independent module, per se, but is a benefit resulting from the right combination of hardware controllers and software.  Presumably, any laptop with the proper combination will display the WiDi icon, as is the case with some current laptops.

 

We agree with your quote that the technology is not necessarily ready for widespread acceptance, especially for those who want to view encrypted content.  Furtunately, our emphasis is not on streaming encrypted content.  As such, we might attach greater utility to the current product than others.

 

Either way, it appears to be a step in the right direction.  My main complaint is how the manufacturers market the technology as a simple, comprehensive, complete solution when, in fact, it is not.  Interestingly, the footnote in the link you sent indicates that second generation processors can play the encrypted content without any clear disclaimer to the contrary.

 

Thanks again for the additonal information.

Intern
MartyH
Posts: 36
Member Since: ‎08-08-2010
Message 6 of 8 (8,649 Views)

Re: Intel Wireless Display

Hi LemonPeeler,

 

The footnote sure does imply that:

 

"1080p and Blu-ray* or other protected content playback only available on 2nd generation Intel® Core™ processor-based PCs with built-in visuals enabled." 

 

Not sure what they mean by "built-in visuals enabled".  Since I'm stuck with my 1st generation processor for a while, I won't be testing WiDi anytime soon.  :smileywink:

 

Take care,

Marty

_________________________________


dm4t  i5-430M  4GB-RAM  IntelGraphics

Student
davemckay51
Posts: 1
Member Since: ‎02-08-2012
Message 7 of 8 (7,110 Views)

Re: Intel Wireless Display

My laptop is a HP Pavilion g series. Does it not have Intel Wireless Display. I can't communicate with TV Netgear unit

Student
KellerFest
Posts: 1
Member Since: ‎06-03-2012
Message 8 of 8 (6,438 Views)

Re: Intel Wireless Display

I have a DV6T QE and wonder if the only thing I need for widi is to replace the Realtek wifi adapter with Intel.
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