Question
HP dv2000/6000/8000/9000/tx1000 Video Problems
Replies (765)
Reply
 
Intern
Wayne_Sallee
Posts: 56
Member Since: ‎11-17-2008
Message 11 of 766 (26,145 Views)

Re: HP dv2000/6000/8000/9000/tx1000 Video Problems

[ Edited ]


RonKe wrote:

...But we still need your help!

 

Just think of it this way:  HP is just bein' a good neighbor by tryin' to protect your privacy!






I don't think that there are many if any people here under the age of 13.

You call it protection, I call it censorship.

Maybe it's just a default setting that they have not learned how to turn it off...... We will see.

The webmaster needs to hack this forum, and change it.



And this forum is slow and buggy, though bugs are normal in a newly set up forum. 



Wayne Sallee
Message Edited by ThisForumStinks on 11-18-2008 04:33 AM
Message Edited by ThisForumStinks on 11-18-2008 04:35 AM
Message Edited by ThisForumStinks on 11-18-2008 04:38 AM
Top Student
voltare
Posts: 1
Member Since: ‎11-18-2008
Message 12 of 766 (26,097 Views)

Re: HP dv2000/6000/8000/9000/tx1000 Video Problems

Hi,

 

Just thought I would add my story, so I can keep you posted.

 

My HP Pavilion Notebook dv9543cl started to play up a few weeks ago - it would crash when playing videos etc (something that a "multimedia entertainment computer" surely shouldn't do!)  I bought it in January, so it is barely 10 months old.  Gradually, exactly as described on these threads on the forum, it has gotten worse - messages about trying to repair the nvidia display driver, crashes with displays of garbage green and coloured lines like a bad 80's computer game, sometimes the computer booting up with no display at all, just a black screen.  In general, I can maybe boot into windows or, more likely, safe mode, maybe once or twice out of ten boot-ups, and then it will crash within a minute or so of windows startup, sometimes during bootup.  I gather it's only a matter of time before it completely gives up the ghost.  I've managed to transfer some but not all of my critical files - I hope I have a few more tries to get the rest!

 

I have contacted HP via the online-chat, which seemed to go successfully.  I obliged them by testing on an external monitor etc.  My situation is proving frustrating though.  The computer is, I believe, a US model, which I bought in Australia.  I have since moved to the UK.  I have tried to contact the UK/Europe online chat team, but the login process wouldn't accept my product and serial numbers, presumably because they're for a different region.  So I logged into the Asia-Pacific chat service, and spoke to a lovely chap called Mike, who within a few minutes of me describing my problems accepted that it appeared I needed a replacement motherboard (read, failing Nvidia chip!!)  But when it came to arranging warranty service, he couldn't as I was in the UK - so he was very nice and went to investigate, and then transferred me to what he said was a local tach support chat person.  That person read my details, but said he couldn't deal with it because he wasn't a notebook specialist, and sent me via a link to a new chat who would be able to deal with it.

 

In the new chat, the person was much less useful.  He made me go through all the details again, asking me all the same questions like "what operating system do you have" etc which were not enormously helpful.  Eventually he agreed with me that it "appeared to be a hardware, not a software problem."  Indeed, congratulations!  Then, after investigating my warranty status again (I am still in warranty) he said he couldn't help as he was in the US.  So quite why I ended up with him I don't know.  He said I would need to telephone the HP support desk (at 5p/minute) but was unable to assure me that I wouldn't have to go through the entire troubleshooting process AGAIN!  So it's been a bit frustrating, and two hours later, I'm not lookng forward to ringing HP - I don't know when I will have the time, as I'll need to set aside a good hour I suspect.

 

So I'll let you know how I go.  Hopefully it will be resolved soon.  It is disappointing.  I have had a number of laptops, and they have all had lifespans of 5 years at least.  Now I have a very expensive paperweight sitting on my table.  It's disappointing to know that my data will be wiped too in the process.

 

I am also keen to know if there's anything I should push for:  To me, it seems quite likely that, when these lap tops are "fixed", they are merely replacing the burnt out motherboard/video card with a new one with the same defect.  So is there any way to guarantee that if I get it "fixed" by HP that the problem wont just reoccur in another 10 or so months?

 

Cheers,

 

voltare

Honor Student
McKinley310
Posts: 1
Member Since: ‎11-18-2008
Message 13 of 766 (26,076 Views)

Re: HP dv2000/6000/8000/9000/tx1000 Video Problems

Yes, I also have an HP Pavilion dv9000 series paperwight.  Purchased July 2007 from Circuit City.  It's a dv9225us with a GeForce go 7600.  In January I had issues with the display sort of freezing up, then all the graphics would go screwy and it would look like some weird geometric pattern of colors.  You couldn't actually see the images anymore, just this weird color pattern.  Sent it in for warranty covered repair.  They replaced the graphics card & the motherboard.  I purchased two cooling fans, one that is elevated & one that has double fans.  I've used both coolers at the same time, just make sure it's elevated & cooling.  In September I started having issues where I'd walk away from it for a few minutes and it would go into hibernate.  Well, I could never get it back.  Screen stayed black.  Would have to do a hard boot & often that would take three or four attempts to get it back.  It was out of warranty so I called a local repair shop & it just happen to be stuck in a "not rebooting" pattern.  When I took it in they hooked it up to their diagnostics & said it immediately said hard drive failure.  They saved what they could & replaced the hard drive.  That was $350 out of my pocket.

Of course, all was not well upon getting it back.  The repair shop mistakenly loaded the 32bit Vista OS & I had to send away for a 64 bit recovery disk.  Got it just in time for the comp to start issues with hibernating again.  So, I made some adjustments for it to never hibernate and that worked.  Briefly.  Anytime the top is closed the screen still would go black & I'm back to hard boots.  I called HP support after reading the extended warranty issue. 

At first the rep said that my issue is not one that is listed under the extended warranty.  I explained that the screen goes black and sometimes it stays black when rebooting.  Then I had to read him the issues covered before he said okay.  Box came last week but I am in the middle of moving so I put it off until this weekend when I will be in my new place.  I've been using my comp for school and today it finally decided it was done.  Lid was closed this morning by accident (I'd learned my lesson & was trying to never close it) and when I tried to reboot I got the long beep, followed by two short beeps.  Removed the battery, power plug, and let it sit.  Still nothing.  We've been considering get a new desktop computer for our house.  But I'm struggling with the idea of paying another $1000 when I just spent $1200 last year on this piece of work.  I just hope that HP & nVidia didn't have the same idea as many DVD player companies have.  A friend in that business told me that the reason players are so cheap now is because they are not built to last more than a year, or about 300 plays.  I personally don't think a $1000 machine, or graphics card for that matter, should need to be replaced after a year of use.

Retired
ThatGarenGuy
Posts: 575
Member Since: ‎11-10-2008
Message 14 of 766 (26,029 Views)

Re: HP dv2000/6000/8000/9000/tx1000 Video Problems

Hi, "ThisForumStinks"

 

I've sent you an PrivateMail to see if I can understand some of your concerns. Also, we are very interested in anything that you see that appears slow or buggy. Thanks for being vocal. If there are problems, we'd like to get them ironed out in the next few days. Please click on the PM Icon in the upper right of the screen. It should say "x Messages" and have a little envelope icon.

 

Great to have all of you on the forums. I hope you get the information you need. Personally, I'm here to help with concerns like this you have. I hope to be of assistance.

 

Take Care,

GarenT.

HP Forums Admin

________________________________________________________________________
HP Product Expert for the Officejet Pro X Series.
Was your question answered? Mark it as an Accepted Solution!
See a great post? Give it a Kudos!

Top Student
islandgirlst
Posts: 1
Member Since: ‎11-18-2008
Message 15 of 766 (25,991 Views)

Re: HP dv2000/6000/9000/tx1000 Video Problems


lswaidz wrote:

bwest:

 

I'm glad I hear you found a temporary replacement.  Remember, this thread is about identifying problems and finding solutions, so keep it clean and informative.  If we stick to our guns here we will all be able to help each other out in the long run!


Hi Lance, I believe we've identified the problem(s).

 

The problem is defective Nvidia GPUs causing motherboard failures in a massive number of HP laptops.  The problem is, HP knows about these defective GPUs because they have extended the warranty on a limited number of laptops.  The problems is HP's refusal to repair these motherboards (without passing the cost on to customers) in ALL affected models.  The problem is, I have a HP Pavilion DV9535nr that is 13 months old and has had two motherboard failures.  The probems is, the second failure occurred two weeks past my one year warranty and HP wants $1,003 to repair it.  The problem is, I refuse to pay for a repair on equipment that was defective to begin with, and will fail again because of the defective Nvidia GPU.  The problem is, HP has buried its head in the sand and hopes that consumers will just give up and pay for the repairs AND the problem with that is, we're not going to.  Why?  Because it is not right for HP to pass the cost of defective parts to consumers. Nvidia made the bad GPUs.  Nvidia should be paying HP for our repairs.  Period.

 

The solution that won't happen: HP should extend the warranty on ALL affected models (Like Dell and Apple have done) and not just a select few.

 

My Solution: My HP laptop was used less than 5 hrs/week and has had two motherboard failures in 13 months.  I kept it on a laptop cooler and did not travel with it.  When you spend $1,400 on a laptop, you expect it to last at least 3 years.  I have had two other laptops (IBM & Sony) and neither of those laptops have ever had to be sent in for repairs.  I will NEVER buy another HP product, so help me God.  In fact, I just ordered a spanking new Dell Studio laptop with an ATI graphics card.  Why spend $1,003 to repair a piece of junk HP, when I can have a brand new laptop from a company that really cares about its customers?

 

P.S. I preferred the old forum. This thread is for Koolaid drinkers.

Intern
Wayne_Sallee
Posts: 56
Member Since: ‎11-17-2008
Message 16 of 766 (25,839 Views)

Re: HP dv2000/6000/8000/9000/tx1000 Video Problems


GarenT wrote:

Hi, "ThisForumStinks"

 

I've sent you an PrivateMail to see if I can understand some of your concerns. Also, we are very interested in anything that you see that appears slow or buggy. Thanks for being vocal. If there are problems, we'd like to get them ironed out in the next few days. Please click on the PM Icon in the upper right of the screen. It should say "x Messages" and have a little envelope icon.

 

Great to have all of you on the forums. I hope you get the information you need. Personally, I'm here to help with concerns like this you have. I hope to be of assistance.

 

Take Care,

GarenT.

HP Forums Admin


 

I responded to your IM.

E-mail is more efficient. :smileywink:

 

This fourm would not let me creat the screen name "WayneSallee" because it's too similar to my e-mail. 

 

The forums load slow. if you try to edit a post that you made, it disables spacing. One has to go into html to insert <br>'s, or <p>'s.

 

The forum breaks if you try to edit your post, and before it fully loads, you click on "Edit as HTML"

 

Wayne Sallee

Wayne@WayneSallee.com

 

Grad Student
James_Cummins
Posts: 148
Member Since: ‎11-18-2008
Message 17 of 766 (25,751 Views)

Re: HP dv2000/6000/8000/9000/tx1000 Video Problems

The old forum loaded so slowly largely because the topic had so many replies.  Since I am new to this forum I don't know all the design aspects, but what will be important to keep it loading faster is the same that could be done to the old forum, to simply limit the number of replies per page and have page number and next/back links to navigate the topic.

 

Also, calling the old forum old as-if it should be abandoned may be counter-productive, doing a basic search engine search, that forum comes up higher in the hits than this one does, so more people are likely to go there instead of here, and given how many topics there are and so many posts, many will post there long before seeing any link to this forum.

 

In short, I think this forum is a bad idea, that the old one should remain the URL and improved if necessary instead of dividing and obfuscating sources of information.

Grad Student
James_Cummins
Posts: 148
Member Since: ‎11-18-2008
Message 18 of 766 (25,820 Views)

Re: HP dv2000/6000/9000/tx1000 Video Problems


islandgirlst wrote:

lswaidz wrote:

bwest:

 

I'm glad I hear you found a temporary replacement.  Remember, this thread is about identifying problems and finding solutions, so keep it clean and informative.  If we stick to our guns here we will all be able to help each other out in the long run!


Hi Lance, I believe we've identified the problem(s).

 

The problem is defective Nvidia GPUs causing motherboard failures in a massive number of HP laptops.  The problem is, HP knows about these defective GPUs because they have extended the warranty on a limited number of laptops.  The problems is HP's refusal to repair these motherboards (without passing the cost on to customers) in ALL affected models.  The problem is, I have a HP Pavilion DV9535nr that is 13 months old and has had two motherboard failures.  The probems is, the second failure occurred two weeks past my one year warranty and HP wants $1,003 to repair it.  The problem is, I refuse to pay for a repair on equipment that was defective to begin with, and will fail again because of the defective Nvidia GPU.  The problem is, HP has buried its head in the sand and hopes that consumers will just give up and pay for the repairs AND the problem with that is, we're not going to.  Why?  Because it is not right for HP to pass the cost of defective parts to consumers. Nvidia made the bad GPUs.  Nvidia should be paying HP for our repairs.  Period.

 

The solution that won't happen: HP should extend the warranty on ALL affected models (Like Dell and Apple have done) and not just a select few.

 

My Solution: My HP laptop was used less than 5 hrs/week and has had two motherboard failures in 13 months.  I kept it on a laptop cooler and did not travel with it.  When you spend $1,400 on a laptop, you expect it to last at least 3 years.  I have had two other laptops (IBM & Sony) and neither of those laptops have ever had to be sent in for repairs.  I will NEVER buy another HP product, so help me God.  In fact, I just ordered a spanking new Dell Studio laptop with an ATI graphics card.  Why spend $1,003 to repair a piece of junk HP, when I can have a brand new laptop from a company that really cares about its customers?

 

P.S. I preferred the old forum. This thread is for Koolaid drinkers.


The problem is twofold.  The first and primary problem is these laptops do not have an appropriate heatsink and thermal interface material to the chipset.  That causes the chipset to run much hotter than it should for long life.

 

This was an engineering mistake, while many end-users try for the lowest temp possible on their desktop parts there is still a real upper limit that shouldn't be exceeded but was.  That limit is not one of immediate instability, it has always been one of lifespan.  We have seen some web news articles about nVidia solder bump problems, but these problems only surface if a chip was allowed to run too hot.  Why are we seeing the problems now and not before?  Because it's not a matter of "defect" per se, it's because heat density went up again as it always did but engineers did not design appropriate heatsinking solutions that not only dealt with total heat but heat density as chips kept shrinking in die size.  

 

nVidia conceded that their chips are vulnerable to damage when temperature becomes excessive and/or lots of thermal cycles but key is what range these thermal cycles cover.  Otherwise thermal cycling is nothing new, has happened for a fair amount of time already.  The problem is that today's CPUs do very well at entering a low power state when they are idle, so when CPU temp drops and the old way of thinking caused the fan speed to slow down based only on feedback about CPU temp, it ignored that other parts depend on the same cooling subsystem and also need not only monitored, but also feedback from that monitoring being used to determine the fan speed, and design of the heatsink used.

 

In summary, a minimalistic heat pipe and a thick silicone thermal pad just doesn't cut it anymore.  Cooling needs to have some margin even if it costs $5 more initially, but to be fair technology advances at such a rapid pace that this may be chaulked up to a lesson learned, that in the future these kinds of problems will be a factor in designing for more reliable laptops.

Student
nathanernest
Posts: 1
Member Since: ‎11-19-2008
Message 19 of 766 (25,667 Views)

Re: HP dv2000/6000/8000/9000/tx1000 Video Problems

Same problem here.

 

I think HP should remember that there are other thousands of people that do not go to forums, they take their computer to a repair shop and the answer is its out of warranty, get a new one.

 

This sickens me. HP are supposed to be the best notebook distributer in the world, they will spend thousands of dollars on televesion advertising but cant afford the money to fix these problems. NVIDIA has addmittted to this problem, but as we know, HP just doesn't want to deal with it. Maybe there are kick backs in HP if they limit the number of chips nvidia will eventualy have to replace?

 

Lets see what happens :-(

 

DV908TX

RE132PA ABG

Intern
Wayne_Sallee
Posts: 56
Member Since: ‎11-17-2008
Message 20 of 766 (25,631 Views)

Re: HP dv2000/6000/8000/9000/tx1000 Video Problems



James_Cummins wrote:

The old forum loaded so slowly largely because the topic had so many replies.  Since I am new to this forum I don't know all the design aspects, but what will be important to keep it loading faster is the same that could be done to the old forum, to simply limit the number of replies per page and have page number and next/back links to navigate the topic.

 

Also, calling the old forum old as-if it should be abandoned may be counter-productive, doing a basic search engine search, that forum comes up higher in the hits than this one does, so more people are likely to go there instead of here, and given how many topics there are and so many posts, many will post there long before seeing any link to this forum.

 

In short, I think this forum is a bad idea, that the old one should remain the URL and improved if necessary instead of dividing and obfuscating sources of information.




I prefer large listings of posts.
 
But this forum is good about that because if you go to your personal settings, you get to choose how many posts show up per page.
 
This forum seems to be very conformable to the user's preference in that and other ways.
 
But if you look at how long it takes for this forum with a few posts to load up compaired to the other forum to load up with the same number of posts, you will see that this forum loads slower. One reason that it loads slower is because of the excessive graphics. There are also probably internal code that is not as efficient.
 
Wayne Sallee
 
† The opinions expressed above are the personal opinions of the authors, not of HP. By using this site, you accept the Terms of Use and Rules of Participation