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HP dv2000/6000/8000/9000/tx1000 Video Problems
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Tutor
glenmike
Posts: 12
Member Since: ‎11-21-2008
Message 81 of 766 (12,324 Views)

Re: HP dv2000/6000/8000/9000/tx1000 Video Problems

I too have a HP dv9260us with RP243UA model number. Mine was purchased April 2007 and died August 2008 with exactly the same video problems. It originally cost $2400.00 with the tax added in. I am now using my old cheap 5 year old E-machines notebook computer because I will not spend any more money on repairing my HP. It now gathers dust in a corner.
 
I agree HP should extend the free repair to all of us with Intel processors and Nvidia chips. Our computers are failing just like the less expensive AMDs that are included in the "recall".
Intern
Wayne_Sallee
Posts: 56
Member Since: ‎11-17-2008
Message 82 of 766 (12,315 Views)

Re: HP dv2000/6000/8000/9000/tx1000 Video Problems

Take a look at this page:
http://support.apple.com/kb/TS2377

It notes that Nvidia was not telling them the truth.

It also notes that the computers were made between May 2007 and September 2008

So if you got a new HP motherboard in this time frame, or a new HP laptop during this time frame, it is most likely that HP was sending out bad motherboards with bad Nvidia chips durring that time.

And that reflects what we are seeing from people that got such from HP durring that time.

And since the companies involved don't want to tell us what is really going on, it is likely that they are still sending out bad motherboards.

 

 

Wayne Sallee

Wayne@WayneSallee.com

 

Honor Student
desh
Posts: 2
Member Since: ‎11-27-2008
Message 83 of 766 (12,300 Views)

Re: HP dv2000/6000/8000/9000/tx1000 Video Problems

[ Edited ]

I lost use of my HP Pavillion DV9207US p/n: RP282ua Nvidia Geforce 7600 Intel CPU/MOBO just 2 weeks after warranty. It has no video whatsoever and will not boot .  I am totally dissatisfied with this hp 9207us inferior product. This 1 year and 3 week old garbage $900.00 laptop fails to boot up at all even after 9 months of sitting and refusing to give 1 red cent to any other HP Product until they can make it right and take care of it's once loyal customers.
troubleshooting : When power button is pressed or wand over, all led light up and chirp when passed over, no video at all,no post test.
setting changes : the only thing that changed since this 13 month old pile of junk died is that I am writing this Email with an 10 year old Gateway laptop that works perfectly. I hope that they realize that I thought I was buying a top of the line notebook just like the other ones that I purchased and found that after 55 weeks it was completely inoperable through no fault of mine and no offer to repair or admit that it had a defect and sat for close to 9 months before I would try again to see if tech support would even listen to what I have been saying all along. I hope that they are made to recall these models and not turn their back on once loyal customers as the records should show!!

Message Edited by desh on 11-27-2008 04:15 PM
Grad Student
James_Cummins
Posts: 148
Member Since: ‎11-18-2008
Message 84 of 766 (12,311 Views)

Re: HP dv2000/6000/8000/9000/tx1000 Video Problems

People keep saying "bad nVidia chips" and to that I have to say, "no, the situation that caused it to fail should never have happened".

 

Ask someone if it's ok, reasonable, if their desktop CPU reached 85C, let alone beyond that.  If someone told any competent tech that their CPU was that hot, suggestions would include remounting the heatsink, reapplying thermal compound, reassessing the case cooling subsystem, the quality of the heatsink on it, the fan model and speed, etc.

 

Bottom line- no, it is not an nVidia fault if a chip fails after running past 80C for several months.  ONLY a misengineering cooling subsystems will allow the chipset to get that hot, and apparently, only after it runs very hot for a long time does it fail.

 

DUH?  Yeah, that's exactly why a chip isn't supposed to run so hot.  It's such a basic common knowledge thing that I can't see how anyone can claim with a straight face that we can ignore inadequate heatsinking and then blame a part that was allowed to constantly overheat.

 

Please list all the systems you have that run the parts at 85C+ and lasted long term.  In any system, all systems, 85C is a sign of overheating that will cause damage.  It would be ridiculous to wait until that has happened then blame the part that was allowed to overheat and blame it, or it's manufacturer. 

 

On the opposite note, nVidia did not plan for this situation, they had assumed no manufacturer would be so negligent to allow soemthing to overheat and then let people claim "see what happens if you don't heatsink it and it gets as hot as the sun and melts, obviously it must be defective".

 

It's all nonsense and Wayne Sallee, you have no understanding of anything more than you read in a ridiculous media frenzy induced web event.

 

These chips last several years not one or three, if kept at the proper temperature like any other chip.  The nVidia solder bump issue will not cause temperature increase, the only thing it will do is cause fractures at excessive temp.   Therefore, there will not be any failures unless the system designer did not design for the heat the chipset produces.

 

What happened?  I mean why these faults?  Because system integrators were either ignorant, didn't bother to read the chipset spec sheets, or made good recommendations then bean-counters somewhere who were ignorant overrode their decision and called for inadequate heatsinking.

 

Let's be very clear about the situation.  It is not bad motherboards.  It is defective design that does not remove X amount of heat from a chipset spec'd to produce that X amount of heat.

 

It would be like knowing your car gets 20 MPG based on the automaker or 3rd party testing, filling it with 2 gallons of gas, then blaming the automaker for not getting 70 miles out of 2 gallons of gas.  Madness.

 

In the past I wouldn't have bothered to mention such things, but today we have more and more features in a chipset, die sizes shrinking more and more too.  Good heatsinking is critical, and will be even more in the future.  We should not blame a manufacturer of chipsets for making a die-shrunk chipset that is, as a result, cheaper for the manufacturer, if that manufacturer can't build a proper design around it.  Bottom line- you can't just use a generic heatsink/heatpipe design without considering what is where and hot much heat it produces, and which temperature levels cause the fan to speed up.

 

To some extent, we could even blame the bios producer if they don't provide options to speed up the fan based on thresholds from both the chipset and CPU, since it is obviously not enough to only focus on the temperature of only one or the other.

Student
jamie
Posts: 1
Member Since: ‎11-28-2008
Message 85 of 766 (12,233 Views)

Re: HP dv2000/6000/8000/9000/tx1000 Video Problems

Hello , I have a hp pavilion T5250 laptop with 1.5 ghz and 1gb of ram with an inbuilt of 64 mb nvidia graphics memory . The warranty is over and it started to trouble me . I play a lot of games for hours and suddenly my laptop restarts , vertical lines appear on the screen , and it shows to choose the mode u want to start when i start it in a normal mode , it starts but it stops responding and nothing but a blank screen i can see . When i reinstall my os it works fine for some time and later the problem repeats . I dont know what the actual problem is so i had taken it to hp service centre , after 2 days they informed me that there is some fault in motherboard and it should be replaced and it would cost around the half of the price of the laptop . so i rejected and i dont know what actually should i do. I want to repair my laptop at least cost possible . Can you guys please answer to my problem regarding 1. What is the actual problem and which part in motherboard is damaged? 2. Can i get replacement for the parts in a motherboard from the market, not from the hp coz thy want to replace the whole motherboard 3. Where in can i get those parts ? I am desperately waitin for ur reply in forum or my mail address is sarodevk@rediff.com
Intern
Wayne_Sallee
Posts: 56
Member Since: ‎11-17-2008
Message 86 of 766 (12,222 Views)

Re: HP dv2000/6000/8000/9000/tx1000 Video Problems



James_Cummins wrote:

People keep saying "bad nVidia chips" and to that I have to say, "no, the situation that caused it to fail should never have happened".

 

Ask someone if it's ok, reasonable, if their desktop CPU reached 85C, let alone beyond that.  If someone told any competent tech that their CPU was that hot, suggestions would include remounting the heatsink, reapplying thermal compound, reassessing the case cooling subsystem, the quality of the heatsink on it, the fan model and speed, etc.

 

Bottom line- no, it is not an nVidia fault if a chip fails after running past 80C for several months.  ONLY a misengineering cooling subsystems will allow the chipset to get that hot, and apparently, only after it runs very hot for a long time does it fail.

 

DUH?  Yeah, that's exactly why a chip isn't supposed to run so hot.  It's such a basic common knowledge thing that I can't see how anyone can claim with a straight face that we can ignore inadequate heatsinking and then blame a part that was allowed to constantly overheat.

 

Please list all the systems you have that run the parts at 85C+ and lasted long term.  In any system, all systems, 85C is a sign of overheating that will cause damage.  It would be ridiculous to wait until that has happened then blame the part that was allowed to overheat and blame it, or it's manufacturer. 

 

On the opposite note, nVidia did not plan for this situation, they had assumed no manufacturer would be so negligent to allow soemthing to overheat and then let people claim "see what happens if you don't heatsink it and it gets as hot as the sun and melts, obviously it must be defective".

 

It's all nonsense and Wayne Sallee, you have no understanding of anything more than you read in a ridiculous media frenzy induced web event.

 

These chips last several years not one or three, if kept at the proper temperature like any other chip.  The nVidia solder bump issue will not cause temperature increase, the only thing it will do is cause fractures at excessive temp.   Therefore, there will not be any failures unless the system designer did not design for the heat the chipset produces.

 

What happened?  I mean why these faults?  Because system integrators were either ignorant, didn't bother to read the chipset spec sheets, or made good recommendations then bean-counters somewhere who were ignorant overrode their decision and called for inadequate heatsinking.

 

Let's be very clear about the situation.  It is not bad motherboards.  It is defective design that does not remove X amount of heat from a chipset spec'd to produce that X amount of heat.

 

It would be like knowing your car gets 20 MPG based on the automaker or 3rd party testing, filling it with 2 gallons of gas, then blaming the automaker for not getting 70 miles out of 2 gallons of gas.  Madness.

 

In the past I wouldn't have bothered to mention such things, but today we have more and more features in a chipset, die sizes shrinking more and more too.  Good heatsinking is critical, and will be even more in the future.  We should not blame a manufacturer of chipsets for making a die-shrunk chipset that is, as a result, cheaper for the manufacturer, if that manufacturer can't build a proper design around it.  Bottom line- you can't just use a generic heatsink/heatpipe design without considering what is where and hot much heat it produces, and which temperature levels cause the fan to speed up.

 

To some extent, we could even blame the bios producer if they don't provide options to speed up the fan based on thresholds from both the chipset and CPU, since it is obviously not enough to only focus on the temperature of only one or the other.



I don't believe that there is nothing wrong with the Nvidia chips, when it affects a large number of computer manufacturers.
 
I don't disagree that the laptops are not being properly cooled, and that they are being cheesy with their design, but I also don't believe that there was nothing wrong with the Nvidia chip design.
 
 
And the problem is that the manufactures are not being open and honest about what is going on.
 
Wayne Sallee

 
Teacher
RonKe
Posts: 79
Member Since: ‎11-17-2008
Message 87 of 766 (12,181 Views)

Re: HP dv2000/6000/8000/9000/tx1000 Video Problems

James_Cummins,

 

I agree with most of your statements; however, the NVIDIA CEO acknowledged that some chips were defective and he likely under-reported the problem.

 

The defective NVIDIA chips are the problem and the heatsinks issues contribute to enhance the failures. 

 

From the CPUID HW program you linked to for us, which I now use, my machine recently got up to 80 deg C while a Windows Media Player video was on PAUSE for less than 10 minutes while I was distracted by a phone call.  Had I not had the program, I would have never guessed GPU temps would rise to that high level in that video pause instance.

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Sig: Pavilion Model Series# dv9500t (t=Intel)_CTO_Prod# RL653AV_Vista Ultimate (64-bit)_SP1_Intel 2 Duo CPU T7500_2 GB Ram_BIOS F.09_NVIDIA 8600M GS_200GB 7200RPM SATA Dual HD (100GBx2)_HP 300GB HD USB Kit for xb3000_8/2007
Honor Student
Ireg2post1
Posts: 3
Member Since: ‎11-28-2008
Message 88 of 766 (12,157 Views)

Re: HP dv2000/6000/8000/9000/tx1000 Video Problems

[ Edited ]

Salutations,

 

I have an HP TX1000 Notebook, model number RD223AVR, serial number 2CB7150z2r. The screen becomes garbled or distorted. Sometimes it just goes black. Sometimes it will freeze up. Sometimes it won't even boot up. The wireless adapter has stopped functioning.

 

It is 27 days past its warranty expiration date.

 

(I knock everybody down with a feather)

 

So, I get on the phone with the poor kid at the HP help desk. Apparently this computer, although listed in the Forum Title (TX1000), is not listed under HP's enhanced warranty program. I'm having the same symptoms as the other models listed. The TX1000 has the same affected Nvidia hardware (go6150 gpu, amd cpu).

 

I was denied.

 

I was given a Case Number. Somebody will call me back they say.

 

Now, the truth is, this is actually a clients computer. She brought it to me last week. I did the usual song and dance on the thing and thought we had it licked. She returned it the next day with the same problem. I then did some temp monitoring on it running a stress test. Holy cow. 80+ celisus on the cpu and a whopping 100c on the gpu. 

 

Untennable.

 

I made sure the cooling vents were clear of dust using compressed air. I also detached the keyboard and made sure there were no blockages there either.

 

I am at HP's brick wall as of now. I hope this is still an active issue and somebody hears my plight.

 

Jay

Message Edited by Ireg2post1 on 11-28-2008 04:21 PM
Message Edited by Ireg2post1 on 11-28-2008 04:21 PM
Message Edited by Ireg2post1 on 11-28-2008 05:08 PM
Grad Student
James_Cummins
Posts: 148
Member Since: ‎11-18-2008
Message 89 of 766 (12,130 Views)

Re: HP dv2000/6000/8000/9000/tx1000 Video Problems

TX1000 may also have a bios update that speeds up the fan.  I recommend not running the system otherwise until you can get the temperatures down, then if HP simply won't do anything about your model you might consider disassembling it and slightly modifying the heatsink so it sits lower on the GPU, leaving off the thermal pads and applying synthetic heatsink grease instead.  Only do that after you have completely given up on the warranty (if you haven't already) since that will void it.
Honor Student
Ireg2post1
Posts: 3
Member Since: ‎11-28-2008
Message 90 of 766 (12,124 Views)

Re: HP dv2000/6000/8000/9000/tx1000 Video Problems

Thanks.

 

I did the latest available bios update. No solution there. After 30 minutes of torture testing using ATI Tool's artifact scanning and Orthos cpu stress test it finally locked up. The gpu peaked at 103c no joke. The cooling vents were not obstructed in any way.

 

The re-seating of the gpu heatsink would be plausible. However, that would not address the wireless adapter simply dropping off the face of the earth for no apparent reason.

 

I predict this TX1000 becomes a 1300 dollar food tray.

 

 

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