Manufacturers+part idents. for 512-MB RAM modules for HP, ZE1115+ZE1110, Pavilion notebook comps.? (565 Views)
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XYZ100
Posts: 8
Member Since: ‎12-11-2010
Message 1 of 4 (565 Views)

Manufacturers+part idents. for 512-MB RAM modules for HP, ZE1115+ZE1110, Pavilion notebook comps.?

So far I've been having a hard time increasing the Random Access Memory (RAM) in my Hewlett Packard (HP), ZE1110, Pavilion notebook computer from a total of 256 MegaBytes (MB) to a total of 1,024 MB without problemsI'm reasonably convinced that this is possible for two reasons: 1) A seller on ebay.com sold such a computer which worked with approximately 1,000 MB of RAM in it; however, I don't know which company manufactured that RAM and its part identification2) For the very similar HP, ZE1115, Pavilion notebook computer, which uses the same, VIA KN133 (north bridge) + VT8231 (south bridge) motherboard chipset; can use the same, JA.M1.31 BIOS (Basic Input Output System); and uses a very similar Advanced MicroDevices (AMD), Morgan-core, Duron central processing unit (cpu) with a processing speed of 1.1 GigaHertz (GHz) instead of my cpu's 1.0-GHz processing speed, HP's Web site states that up to 1,000 or so of MB of RAM can be used in itFor the HP, ZE1115, Pavilion notebook computer the Original Equipment Manufacturer (OEM) part identifications F2298A and F2298-69001 have been reported workable for 512-MB RAM modules in such a computer within one or more HP Web sitesI would like to locate two, 512-MB RAM modules of those types or modules which can perform a function equivalent to that of those RAM modulesThe working pair of 128-MB RAM modules which came with my computer has the following identification: Hynix, Korea, 01, HYM71V16M635HCT6-H AA, 128 MB, PC133U-333-542, Sync, 133 MHz, CL3; my computer's manual also mentions 144 pins, 3.3 volts and SODIMM (Small-Outline Dual-Inline Memory Module) for a RAM module in my computerThe physical size of each module must be 1.25 inches by 2.66 or 2.69 or so inchesNotice that the company Hynix apparently produced this RAM for HP or else sold this RAM to HPI found a datasheet for that working series of Hynix modules and learned that each of eight SDRAM (Synchronous Dynamic RAM), CMOS (Complementary Metal-Oxide Semiconductor) packages in such a working, 128-MB module contains 16 chips, with each such chip having a capacity of 8 megabits for data storageSo to check the mathematics, 8 SDRAM packages/(SDRAM module) x 16 chips/package x (8 million bits/chip)/(8 bits/byte) = 128 million bytes/(SDRAM module)=128 MB/(SDRAM module).  So eight megabits/chip is apparently the capacity of a chip involved outside of RAM modules, but with RAM on my computer's motherboardThe replacement 512-MB modules should therefore also have capacities of eight megabits/chip.  (I have thought of a "chip" as an integrated circuitBut no, as it is used here one "package," which I have thought of as an "integrated circuit," can contain several "chips."  So it appears to me that a chip, as used here, is a unit of circuitry which may be repeated multiple times in one package or integrated circuitSomeone can correct me, if my thinking is incorrect in some way or ways here.)

So far I have received two pairs of 512-MB RAM modules from one company; but unfortunately neither of the pairs worked properly in my computerFor the second pair only about half of the installed memory was reported as installed in Windows XP Home EditionI am probably going to return the second pair back to the company as wellThe money has already been paid for the RAMI think I still may have the options of requesting replacement RAM or obtaining a refund of my moneyBut to choose the replacement option I would like to know for what manufacturer and its part identification I should be requesting the replacement RAMThen if the RAM-selling company with which I have been dealing does not have that RAM in its stock, perhaps I should request a refund of my money.

I suppose that the HP, OEM part identifications F2298A and F2298-69001 may actually correspond to RAM modules produced by other companies for HPTo what companies and their part identifications do the OEM part identifications F2298A and F2298-69001 correspondOtherwise, if someone has found 512-MB RAM modules to actually work in a HP, ZE1110 or ZE1115, Pavilion notebook computer, please report the manufacturer of those RAM modules and their part numbers or identifications to me hereYou might have to open the door on the bottom of such a notebook computer in order to read the manufacturer and part identification of the working, 512-MB RAM modulesThen one could hope to either obtain that very type of RAM or else to find datasheets for such RAM in hopes of finding compatible RAM.

Other possible approaches:

1) This question may not make sense because the question may need to be asked for the companies which may have made RAM upgrades for the HP, ZE1115, Pavilion notebook computerBut are there datasheets available for the HP, OEM part identifications F2298A or F2298-69001?
2) On the Internet there are numerous Web sites which can suggest RAM for a computer manufacturer and model number using computer programs which are sometimes called memory configuratorsPerhaps some of them could be tried in hopes that particular RAM manufacturers and their part identifications are contained in the results of using such memory configurators.  [For the HP, ZE1110, Pavilion notebook computer some Web sites report that it can accommodate a maximum of 1,000 or so MB of RAM; others report a maximum of 512 MB for itFor the reasons I discussed above, I think that approximately 1,000 MB or 1 GigaByte (GB) of RAM is likely to be the correct, maximum, accommodatable RAM for my computer.]  
3) I heard of at least one company in the Philippines which can sell old computer parts.
4) Online I found a price for the OEM RAM which may be considerably more expensive than the RAM sold by one or more companies (Perhaps the cheaper RAM might sometimes not be OEM RAM.).  That should be a workable, but more expensive way to solve this problem.  Still I don't know which companies manufactured such OEM RAM for HP.  I suppose by buying such OEM RAM and looking at the company name and part identification on the purchased RAM,  one could learn the data that way.  But, if possible, I would like to know those data before requesting the replacement RAM.

Please help me.  Thanks.
    

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Huffer
Posts: 10,501
Member Since: ‎11-12-2008
Message 2 of 4 (552 Views)

Re: Manufacturers+part idents. for 512-MB RAM modules for HP, ZE1115+ZE1110, Pavilion notebook comps

I am going back a bit here but I owned a laptop in that series quite a while ago. It was a Sam's Club Special the Pavilion xf145, also with an AMD processor and Via chipset with S3 graphics. Mine came with 512 memory from the factory, which was a big deal back then. It was my issues with that laptop that got me started in this forum years ago. It ran very hot and would hang up until HP issued a new BIOS after several months. I also recall there were issues with people trying to upgrade to 1 gig of RAM. I don't think they were having success. I never tried to do that, sticking with 512 until I sold the laptop about a year after I got it. I also recall it was very finicky about the memory it would accept. Sorry to not recall a lot of details but make sure you use memory modules that are configured like the factory modules, i.e. that have chips on one side or both sides. When a computer only sees part of the installed memory, it is because of a density issue most likely. I also would encourage you to buy from crucial.com. I have never had a compatibility issue with their memory.

 

Crucial's ZE1100 page

 

Crucual says 512 megs is the max RAM you can have in it, confirming my memories (no pun intended).

Top Student
XYZ100
Posts: 8
Member Since: ‎12-11-2010
Message 3 of 4 (536 Views)

Re: Manufacturers+part idents. for 512-MB RAM modules for HP, ZE1115+ZE1110, Pavilion notebook comps

Thanks, Huffer, for kindly taking some time to post some things from your experience here.  Can you tell me why you think having integrated circuits on one or both sides of the RAM module just like the factory-supplied RAM module would be important?  There might be something for me to learn here.

The most important, practical part of the challenge I faced was finding not-too-expensive, 512-MegaByte (MB), Random Access Memory (RAM) modules that would work properly in my Hewlett Packard (HP), ZE1110, Pavilion notebook computer; learning the manufacturers and part identifications of Original Equipment Manufacturer (OEM), 512-MB RAM modules usable in HP, ZE1110 and ZE1115, Pavilion notebook computers and how to match the RAM to a computer could be interesting and educational and otherwise might have helped me find a solution.  In at least that practical part of the challenge very gratefully my dilemma fortunately had a good solution!  On the same day I posted the starting portion of this thread I read on the RAM seller's Web site that one should, in effect, remove dust from the electrical contacts of the RAM modules and make good electrical contact between the RAM modules and the computer.  So I blew across both RAM modules' contacts on probably both sides of each RAM module.  I inserted them into the computer, first one, 512-MB module into one RAM-module slot, leaving the other slot empty.  I also removed and reinstalled my notebook computer's nearly "dead" computer battery, something I forgot to do in an earlier, failed RAM test, but something I doubt could be important, since my computer battery was practically dead.  Nearly the correct amount of RAM was reported installed by Windows XP Home Edition.  Next I similarly added the second, 512-MB RAM module in the second RAM-module slot.  This time very gratefully Windows XP reported 0.98 gigabytes of RAM installed!

Like you thought, in the first failed attempt to install those recently received, two, 512-MB RAM modules I at first thought there was what you called a density problem, or that the RAM modules had the wrong data capacities per "chip," or megabits per "chip" as I used "chip" in my earlier posting compared to integrated circuits on the motherboard that deal with the RAM modules (That is one "package" or "integrated circuit" may contain multiple units of circuitry, each here called a "chip.").  But this is my new hypothesis: I suspect that the electrical connections between the contacts and my computer were good for one of the two, 512-MB RAM modules and not good for the other of the two, 512-MB RAM modules, leading to Windows XP reporting only about half of the physically installed RAM in my first failed attempt to test my newly received, 512-MB RAM modules.  Then in the second attempt I suppose I may have had good electrical contact between the contacts of both RAM modules and my computer, leading to my computer reporting 0.98 gigabytes of installed RAM, or close to the physically installed 1.024 gigabytes of RAM.

Those 512-MB RAM modules which were used successfully in my HP, ZE1110, Pavilion notebook computer were made by Samsung Corporation, sold associated with the part identification 494ms-162 by the company Memorystock.com (http://www.memorystock.com/ on the Internet), and probably each has the Samsung part identification M464S6453EV0-L7A with the other specifications "Sync," 133 MHz (MegaHertz), CL3, and PC133S-333-542.  The integrated circuits on those successfully used, 512-MB RAM modules are labeled as K4S560832E-VL75, Samsung, 622, 260735XN.  I think that last "X" is an "X" instead of an "H" because the width of the capital letter is somewhat narrower at the horizontal crossbar of it than at the top and bottom of that capital letter.  Contrary to what I earlier wrote, fortunately and very gratefully it now does not appear that I will have to return the newly acquired Samsung RAM modules back to the seller of them.---These RAM modules, purchased from Memorystock.com, very gratefully work properly in my HP, ZE1110, Pavilion notebook computer and for a price that was lower than I found at some of the other Web sites for RAM recommended for my computer!

Top Student
XYZ100
Posts: 8
Member Since: ‎12-11-2010
Message 4 of 4 (533 Views)

Re: Manufacturers+part idents. for 512-MB RAM modules for HP, ZE1115+ZE1110, Pavilion notebook comps

Thanks, Huffer, for kindly taking some time to post some things from your experience here.  Can you tell me why you think having integrated circuits on one or both sides of the RAM module just like the factory-supplied RAM module would be important?  There might be something for me to learn here.

The most important, practical part of the challenge I faced was finding not-too-expensive, 512-MegaByte (MB), Random Access Memory (RAM) modules that would work properly in my Hewlett Packard (HP), ZE1110, Pavilion notebook computer; learning the manufacturers and part identifications of Original Equipment Manufacturer (OEM), 512-MB RAM modules usable in HP, ZE1110 and ZE1115, Pavilion notebook computers and how to match the RAM to a computer could be interesting and educational and otherwise might have helped me find a solution.  In at least that practical part of the challenge very gratefully my dilemma fortunately had a good solution!  On the same day I posted the starting portion of this thread I read on the RAM seller's Web site that one should, in effect, remove dust from the electrical contacts of the RAM modules and make good electrical contact between the RAM modules and the computer.  So I blew across both RAM modules' contacts on probably both sides of each RAM module.  I inserted them into the computer, first one, 512-MB module into one RAM-module slot, leaving the other slot empty.  I also removed and reinstalled my notebook computer's nearly "dead" computer battery, something I forgot to do in an earlier, failed RAM test, but something I doubt could be important, since my computer battery was practically dead.  Nearly the correct amount of RAM was reported installed by Windows XP Home Edition.  Next I similarly added the second, 512-MB RAM module in the second RAM-module slot.  This time very gratefully Windows XP reported 0.98 gigabytes of RAM installed!

Like you thought, in the first failed attempt to install those recently received, two, 512-MB RAM modules I at first thought there was what you called a density problem, or that the RAM modules had the wrong data capacities per "chip," or megabits per "chip" as I used "chip" in my earlier posting compared to integrated circuits on the motherboard that deal with the RAM modules (That is one "package" or "integrated circuit" may contain multiple units of circuitry, each here called a "chip.").  But this is my new hypothesis: I suspect that the electrical connections between the contacts and my computer were good for one of the two, 512-MB RAM modules and not good for the other of the two, 512-MB RAM modules, leading to Windows XP reporting only about half of the physically installed RAM in my first failed attempt to test my newly received, 512-MB RAM modules.  Then in the second attempt I suppose I may have had good electrical contact between the contacts of both RAM modules and my computer, leading to my computer reporting 0.98 gigabytes of installed RAM, or close to the physically installed 1.024 gigabytes of RAM.

Those 512-MB RAM modules which were used successfully in my HP, ZE1110, Pavilion notebook computer were made by Samsung Corporation, sold associated with the part identification 494ms-162 by the company Memorystock.com (http://www.memorystock.com/ on the Internet), and probably each has the Samsung part identification M464S6453EV0-L7A with the other specifications "Sync," 133 MHz (MegaHertz), CL3, and PC133S-333-542.  The integrated circuits on those successfully used, 512-MB RAM modules are labeled as K4S560832E-VL75, Samsung, 622, 260735XN.  I think that last "X" is an "X" instead of an "H" because the width of the capital letter is somewhat narrower at the horizontal crossbar of it than at the top and bottom of that capital letter.  Contrary to what I earlier wrote, fortunately and very gratefully it now does not appear that I will have to return the newly acquired Samsung RAM modules back to the seller of them.---As I explained above in more detail on the size in bytes of the RAM reported by Windows XP Home Edition, these RAM modules, purchased from Memorystock.com, very gratefully work pretty well in my HP, ZE1110, Pavilion notebook computer and for a price that was lower than I found at some of the other Web sites for RAM recommended for my computer!

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