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LinuxUser76
Posts: 4
Member Since: ‎01-20-2010
Message 1 of 6 (9,395 Views)

Windows 7 clean install (VM) on Pavilion dv7 notebook

I bought a Pavilion dv7 notebook (model dv7t-3000) about a month ago with Windows7 Professional 64-bit pre-installed.

 

The first thing I did was wipe the HDD clean, reformat it, and install openSUSE 11.2 (which works wonderfully on this machine).  I now wish to install the copy of Windows 7 that came with the computer in a virtual machine, but when I attempt to do so using the System Recovery DVDs I purchased, the install fails every time.  It appears to be looking for the recovery partition, which obviously doesn't exist.

 

Is there a way for me to use the recovery DVDs to do this?  If not, is there a legal way for me to acquire the Windows 7 installation media?  I wish to make use of the OEM-licensed copy of WIndows 7 I paid for on this computer, but not natively installed where it can make a mess of things.

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mpg187
Posts: 18
Member Since: ‎01-20-2010
Message 2 of 6 (9,383 Views)

Re: Windows 7 clean install (VM) on Pavilion dv7 notebook

I wouldn't have wiped it. I would have atleast ran clonezilla and backed it up. I think the recovery CDs only work on the computer make they were made for, and VMs will show up different. Good question though, I wish you luck...
____________________________________________________________________________________
HP Pavillion G50-116 CA|3 GB RAM|2.00 GHz Core 2 Duo|Ubuntu 9.04/Vista Home Premium OEM Dualboot (Update: Replaced Vista with Windows 7 Professional 64 Bit)
HP Compaq TC4400 Tablet|2 GB RAM|2.00 GHz Core 2 Duo|OEM Windows XP Tablet PC Ediiton/Windows 7 Pro 64 Bit Dualboot (Installed Windows 7 yesterday, the day before I joined here)
Honor Student
LinuxUser76
Posts: 4
Member Since: ‎01-20-2010
Message 3 of 6 (9,349 Views)

Re: Windows 7 clean install (VM) on Pavilion dv7 notebook

In hindsight, I think you're right.  My disdain for MS Windows overwhelmed me and I acted perhaps a bit hastily.  It just felt too good to wipe that silly Fat16 recovery partition.

 

Having said that, what I'm trying to do is within the terms of the MS WIndows OEM EULA.  Surely HP has a solution.  Maybe I need to seek a hypervisor that has more stable EFI support.

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mpg187
Posts: 18
Member Since: ‎01-20-2010
Message 4 of 6 (9,337 Views)

Re: Windows 7 clean install (VM) on Pavilion dv7 notebook

Like even if you don't like Windows, if you are paying for it (with your computer) then it would be good to take advantage of it...

 

I keep mine as a dualboot as a fallback.

____________________________________________________________________________________
HP Pavillion G50-116 CA|3 GB RAM|2.00 GHz Core 2 Duo|Ubuntu 9.04/Vista Home Premium OEM Dualboot (Update: Replaced Vista with Windows 7 Professional 64 Bit)
HP Compaq TC4400 Tablet|2 GB RAM|2.00 GHz Core 2 Duo|OEM Windows XP Tablet PC Ediiton/Windows 7 Pro 64 Bit Dualboot (Installed Windows 7 yesterday, the day before I joined here)
Honor Student
LinuxUser76
Posts: 4
Member Since: ‎01-20-2010
Message 5 of 6 (9,229 Views)

Re: Windows 7 clean install (VM) on Pavilion dv7 notebook

W00t! 

 

I solved it.  No dual boot, just a big, fat ext4 partition on the hdd and Win7x86_64, as supplied by HP, fully activated, running in a VM on openSUSE 11.2

 

Anyone interested, PM me for instructions.

Honor Student
LinuxUser76
Posts: 4
Member Since: ‎01-20-2010
Message 6 of 6 (7,289 Views)

Re: Windows 7 clean install (VM) on Pavilion dv7 notebook

Posting the full solution for all to enjoy:

 

 

1) Wipe the machine clean with a fresh NTFS partition (using gparted).  Backup any data you need first.
2) Use the HP Recovery discs to install Win7 natively on the machine.  This takes hours, and hammers the HDD but I don't see a way around it.
3)DO NOT ACTIVATE WINDOWS.  Just do the minimum required to get the OS installed natively
4)Download disk2vhd.exe (a sysinternals program, free download)
5)Use Gparted to shrink and move the NTFS, FAT32 partitions created by the Win7 installer to some reasonable size...say 60 to 80 GB
6)Boot windows again, let it deal with the re-arranged HDD
7) Run disk2vhd and export the installed OS to a disk image on a large-ish external HDD or flash drive.  I used a 1TB WD MyBook, but a much smaller, faster device would have worked.
8) Use GParted to wipe the HDD clean again
9) Install your preferred Linux distro and hypervisor (Virtualbox FTW) natively on the machine
10) Copy the Win7 disk image to a location your hypervisor can see it, or just leave it on the external device
11) Build the VM, reference the Win7 image.  Verify it all boots up and works
12) Update, install drivers, etc in the Win7 VM.
13) Activate windows.  I tried the on-line activation and it didn't work.  However, I called the automated call center and activated wtihout trouble.

1) Wipe the machine clean with a fresh NTFS partition (using gparted).  Backup any data you need first.
2) Use the HP Recovery discs to install Win7 natively on the machine.  This takes hours, and hammers the HDD but I don't see a way around it.
3)DO NOT ACTIVATE WINDOWS.  Just do the minimum required to get the OS installed natively
4)Download disk2vhd.exe (a sysinternals program, free download)
5)Use Gparted to shrink and move the NTFS, FAT32 partitions created by the Win7 installer to some reasonable size...say 60 to 80 GB
6)Boot windows again, let it deal with the re-arranged HDD
7) Run disk2vhd and export the installed OS to a disk image on a large-ish external HDD or flash drive.  I used a 1TB WD MyBook, but a much smaller, faster device would have worked.
8) Use GParted to wipe the HDD clean again
9) Install your preferred Linux distro and hypervisor (Virtualbox FTW) natively on the machine
10) Copy the Win7 disk image to a location your hypervisor can see it, or just leave it on the external device
11) Build the VM, reference the Win7 image.  Verify it all boots up and works
12) Update, install drivers, etc in the Win7 VM.
13) Activate windows.  I tried the on-line activation and it didn't work.  However, I called the automated call center and activated wtihout trouble.

 

† The opinions expressed above are the personal opinions of the authors, not of HP. By using this site, you accept the Terms of Use and Rules of Participation