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marina-veevee
Posts: 8
Member Since: ‎12-09-2011
Message 1 of 19 (17,923 Views)

keyboard zif connector - getting a replacement for top black part

System: dv7 6153nr

 

Was replacing keyboard and snarfled the top part of the zif connector.

 

Question: Can that part be acquired?

 

NB: It would have been nice if the manual gave more detailed instructions on the removal of that part.

 

 

Associate Dean
Mumbodog
Posts: 11,026
Member Since: ‎01-11-2010
Message 2 of 19 (17,915 Views)

Re: keyboard zif connector - getting a replacement for top black part

[ Edited ]

I have never found a source for zif connector parts, other than old notebooks that are kept as parts donors.

 

If the zif socket is not broken, just the latch:

 

Sometimes you can make a paper shim to insert next to the cable down in the socket to keep the cable tight in the socket, just did a Sony the other day using that method. You have to experiment on how thick it needs to be, thick enough to hold the cable and not fall out, but not too thick where you cannot insert it, you can use other materials such as thin plastic, I use paper because it is easier to get the right thickness and width by using different thickness paper and folding. It needs to be the full width of the zif socket to hold even pressure against all the contacts of the cable. Slip the cable in the zif socket, then your shim next to it, its not easy but I have done this many times.

 

Any material that does not conduct electricity will work.

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marina-veevee
Posts: 8
Member Since: ‎12-09-2011
Message 3 of 19 (17,901 Views)

Re: keyboard zif connector - getting a replacement for top black part

Hi, thanks for your prompt reply. Much appreciated.

 

I found a link, which I was going to post, but lost it, of another way of jerry-rigging the connector. When I relocate it, I wil post, so others anhave resolution to a solution.

 

Thanks again!

 


Mumbodog wrote:

I have never found a source for zif connector parts, other than old notebooks that are kept as parts donors.

 

If the zif socket is not broken, just the latch:

 

Sometimes you can make a paper shim to insert next to the cable down in the socket to keep the cable tight in the socket, just did a Sony the other day using that method. You have to experiment on how thick it needs to be, thick enough to hold the cable and not fall out, but not too thick where you cannot insert it, you can use other materials such as thin plastic, I use paper because it is easier to get the right thickness and width by using different thickness paper and folding. It needs to be the full width of the zif socket to hold even pressure against all the contacts of the cable. Slip the cable in the zif socket, then your shim next to it, its not easy but I have done this many times.

 

Any material that does not conduct electricity will work.




Tutor
marina-veevee
Posts: 8
Member Since: ‎12-09-2011
Message 4 of 19 (17,892 Views)

Re: keyboard zif connector - getting a replacement for top black part

Okay, I've found some helpful links for other's in the same dilemma.

 

Start with this one for how to fix the curse of the zif connector:

 

http://www.laptoprepair101.com/laptop/2009/11/17/fix-broken-keyboard-connector-on-laptop-motherboard...

 

Note: If you look closely at your connector, you will see that there are two (2) rows of pins. The ribbon cable goes between them. I also, since the ribbon cable is very short (grrr), positioned the cable and then taped it in place. placing the tape as far back on the cable as allowed, so that I could have easy and free access to the connector. Also, the cable on the keyboard side is attached with an elastic glue. I GENTLY pulled the cable off of the the keyboard metal backing a LITTLE bit. This gave me more slack to work with.

 

And for those who are thinking of doing it themselves, go here first:

 

http://www.insidemylaptop.com/replace-keyboard-in-hp-mini-1033cl-notebook/

 

Above is is not for the dv7, but pay attention to the part where the removal/opening of the zif connector is discussed. It may save you some aggravation.

 

The alternative is to have HP tech do it for between $250-$350. OUCH!

 

Once again, thanks to Mumbodog for your prompt response.

 

 

 

Associate Dean
Mumbodog
Posts: 11,026
Member Since: ‎01-11-2010
Message 5 of 19 (17,887 Views)

Re: keyboard zif connector - getting a replacement for top black part

Thanks for posting, some smaller zif connectors are different and don't have latches, but that was a good article for the latch type, I would have used a hot glue gun instead of tape.

Tutor
marina-veevee
Posts: 8
Member Since: ‎12-09-2011
Message 6 of 19 (17,883 Views)

Re: keyboard zif connector - getting a replacement for top black part

[ Edited ]

You're welcome. I have taken what you posted and what I found and have peppered all the forums, I came across on the net, discussing this situation.

Share the knowledge.

Tutor
marina-veevee
Posts: 8
Member Since: ‎12-09-2011
Message 7 of 19 (17,847 Views)

Re: keyboard zif connector - NOW - How To Fix

[ Edited ]

Input from Mumbodog requested.

 

Okay, I have found some helpful links for other's in the same dilemma.

For those who are thinking of doing it themselves, go here first (review and keep reading on):

http://www.insidemylaptop.com/replace-keyboard-in-hp-mini-1033cl-notebook/

NOTE: The above link is is not for the dv7, but pay attention to the part where the removal/opening of the zif connector is discussed. It may save you some aggravation.

And, if you snafued the connector, start with this one on how to fix the curse of the broken zif connector:

http://www.laptoprepair101.com/laptop/2009/11/17/fix-broken-keyboard-connector-on-laptop-motherboard...


Then read on for the steps I performed, after reviewing the prior links and Mumbodogs input (at the bottom), to resolve this.


REMEMBER: The alternative is to have HP tech do it for between $250-$350. OUCH!


The following are the steps I went through to perform the fix.

The below steps are a bit sporadic. So READ through the whole thing thoroughly FIRST before proceeding (rewrite may ensue).

NOTE: I used a lighted magnifying lamp to assist in the below procedures.

NOTE: If you look closely at your connector, you will see that there are two (2) rows of pins (The exposed contacts of the ribbon cable should be facing down, so that they are making contact with the bottom pins). The ribbon cable goes between them. When re-inserting the zif's top black connector. Observe that on one side it is toothed, like a comb, this end goes towards the board's zif connector (facing the pins). You will have to observe and figure out which side is up.  I also, since the ribbon cable is very short (grrr), positioned the cable and then taped it in place. Placing the tape as far back on the cable as allowed, so that I could have easy and free access to the connector without the cable shifting out of the connector. Also, the cable on the keyboard side is attached with an elastic glue. I GENTLY pulled the cable off of the the keyboard metal backing a LITTLE bit, NOT all the way. This gave me more slack to work with. If you can get by with the slack there is, then don't do it

Now, referencing Mumbodog's fix (further down), I used business card stock (my business card - standard?) cut to fit the width of the connector and approximately a half inch in depth, and a piece of 20lb paper, also cut, but approximately half the depth. The reason for the different depths will become apparent as you read further. I will refer to these as shims. Note: Make sure they are square!

Carefully insert the ribbon cable between the zif connector's two rows of pins, making sure to check the tabs on each side of the cable are seated properly. Secure it with the scotch tape, as mentioned previously (trust me, this will make the next steps a lot easier to perform).

NOTE: Before performing the next step, I had dispensed the tape (scotch) in a length long enough to cover the connector and over onto the metal plate that the keyboard rests on. Dispense enough tape to have excess so that you can fold over each end to create pull tabs. If you don't seat the cable properly on the first try, this will make it easier to remove the tape and try again. Note: Do the same for the piece used to secure the ribbon cable initially.

NOTE: The keyboard will probably want to keep shifting over the zif connector, getting in the way. I used a roll of electrical tape to raise it and brace it back from the work area. Don't go too drastic on trying to keep it out of the way. You don't want to crimp the ribbon cable! Handle everything gingerly.

NOTE: To make the next step easier, I used a 90 degree dental pick to help seat the shims in place. If you have fat fingers, this can save you a lot of aggravation.

Once the cable is inserted and secured, where it wont shift on you. First insert the 20lb paper shim, under the top row of pins, so that it is squarely seated against the connector. Then, insert the biz card shim between the 20lb shim and the cable (the biz-card stock having more depth gives one something to push on when working it between the cable and 20lb stock). It may get caught on the blue reinforcing strip, so go slow and work it until you can insert it in between the two and have it flush against the zif connector's back. I then placed the zif's top black part on top of the paper shims. This done to place more pressure on the ribbon cable ensuring proper contact with the pins. Then apply the tape to firmly secure everything.






Also of note, from Mumbodog:

I have never found a source for zif connector parts, other than old notebooks that are kept as parts donors.

If the zif socket is not broken, just the latch:

Sometimes you can make a paper shim to insert next to the cable down in the socket to keep the cable tight in the socket, just did a Sony the other day using that method. You have to experiment on how thick it needs to be, thick enough to hold the cable and not fall out, but not too thick where you cannot insert it, you can use other materials such as thin plastic, I use paper because it is easier to get the right thickness and width by using different thickness paper and folding. It needs to be the full width of the zif socket to hold even pressure against all the contacts of the cable. Slip the cable in the zif socket, then your shim next to it, its not easy but I have done this many times.

Any material that does not conduct electricity will work.

 

 

Top Student
Ubrales
Posts: 5
Member Since: ‎05-02-2013
Message 8 of 19 (13,758 Views)

Re: keyboard zif connector - getting a replacement for top black part

Marina, thank you for your valuable info!

 

Yesterday while repairing my friend's laptop I noticed that the problem was due to a broken ZIF connector; the one that turns it ON/OFF as well as turns the WiFi ON/OFF. I also noticed a sticker from the repair shop that previously repaired something on the laptop.

 

Based on the info I got from your post I am confident that I can repair this satisfactorily.

Regents Professor
AttackofZaq
Posts: 4,472
Member Since: ‎10-09-2012
Message 9 of 19 (13,752 Views)

Re: keyboard zif connector - getting a replacement for top black part

Hello Ubrales.  I understand you're going to be performing some repairs on your friend's notebook.

I can provide with you some instructions and manuals for repairing the notebook if you provide me with your product number.  This document can show you where it is located.

I hope to hear from you!  Have a great day.

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Please click the white star under my name to give me Kudos as a way to say "Thanks!"

Click the "Accept as Solution" button if I resolve your issue.

Top Student
Ubrales
Posts: 5
Member Since: ‎05-02-2013
Message 10 of 19 (13,711 Views)

Re: keyboard zif connector - getting a replacement for top black part

[ Edited ]

AttackofZaq, thank you for your kind offer!

 

Product: Presario CQ50

 

S/N         {Personal Information Removed}

 

P/N         FR969UA#ABA

 

Thank you!

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