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rshol
Posts: 1
Member Since: ‎03-16-2009
Message 1 of 30 (44,380 Views)

Wireless Does not seem to Connect at 802.11n speed

I just purchased a HP DV3-1075 for my wife.  The specs say it has wireless card that supports 802.11 a,b,g,draft-n.  I have a wireless access point that supports 802.11b,g,n.  My Dell has an 802.11n card and achieves throughput speeds of 5-6Mbps.  When I first connected the HP to my wireless network I got 400-600Kbps throughput (I consider that 802.11b type speed).  My access point was configured to accept connections at b,g and n so I turned off b and throughput on the HP jumped to 2.5-3 Mbps, still about half what I expected.  It seems that the HP is connecting at the lowest available speed instead of the highest.  I need access at g to support our iPhones.  Is there a way to set the HP to connect at the highest available speed, or are my expectations askew.

 

I've never used HP equipment before, it seems like a nice machine with a compelling feature set (the wife likes it because its pretty) and the price was definately right.

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NoNoBadDog
Posts: 131
Member Since: ‎11-27-2008
Message 2 of 30 (44,377 Views)

Re: Wireless Does not seem to Connect at 802.11n speed

You can try to set both the router and the laptop to "n only" mode.

 

Be advised that using N over G will not affect your internet download speed.  You will only notice N speed transfers between N devices on your local arean network;  your router will still only supply the bandwidth/speed avaialbe from your ISP.  Unless you are on a high-speed data plan that delivers more than 8Mbps, even 802.11b is technically faster than your connection. 

 

 

If this post has been helpful to you, please return the favor by clicking on the yellow KUDOS! icon in this box. Thank you! I'm not an HP employee, just someone trying to help others....
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CyberVisions
Posts: 103
Member Since: ‎01-07-2009
Message 3 of 30 (44,290 Views)

Re: Wireless Does not seem to Connect at 802.11n speed

[ Edited ]

Something isn't right with your network - typical speeds for N devices average between 140 and 300 MBPS - you're talking about just 5-6, which is slower than even B speeds (11mbps). My own system averages around 230-300mbps, typical speed for N network devices, depending on the adapter I'm using.

 

Wireless network devices are limited by the slowest device on the LAN; e.g., if you have an N router and 2 systems, one with an N adapter and the other with a G, the one with the G will only attain top G speeds. Similarly, if you have N adapters and a G router, you'll only connect at G speeds even though your adapters are capable of much more. Since your top speed is indicated to be 5-6mbps, it appears you're only connecting at B speeds (11mbps is top throughput for B devices).

 

Generally when you have a speed or signal issue it's the setup of both your Router and the adapters in question. Since you haven't noted the hardware you're using for a router I can't tell you how to set it, but typically for N setups you want to set the Router's Network Mode to Mixed when dealing with devices of mixed wireless capablity. This allows the network to choose which is the best connection for the current setup. You should only choose a specific standard (Wireless N, G, etc.) if all of your devices are in fact Wireless N or Wireless G. Having even one device not completely pedigreed to the standard can cause a slowdown on that device. You've already noted this when you changed your mode turning off B.

 

Note that for Linksys Routers, it is Linksys Support standard practice to have the user download the latest firmware update for their Router model, then flash the firmware (install it) prior to performing any new setups or if you are experiencing problems with signal or connection speeds. You can get the current firmware update from their support site.

 

SSID - ALWAYS enable SSID broadcast and enter a unique SSID name that only you would recognize. It is more likely than you think to connect to a neighbor's network these days, as N signals broadcast quite far. Most people don't bother to change their SSID, and leave the default, which is usually the manufacturer's name - Linksys, etc. Problem is, when you have a lot of people doing the same thing, when their system searches for a wireless network, you're looking for a network called "Linksys" if you didn't change your SSID. If your neighbor didn't either, and didn't bother to enable security on his network, you'll be scratching your head for hours trying to figure out why your signal is so low when the device is right next to it. Or, if he did enable security, why you can't connect to the network at all. Bottom line - always be certain that you're connecting to your network and not someone else's.

 

Standard Channel - Unless you've got a dual-band N Router, the only band you need to be concerned with is 2.4ghz, which is also the same as a G device. Trouble with that is many other home devices use that same frequency band - cordless phones, baby monitors, microwaves, etc., and can cause interference with your network. To alleviate this, it's always best to choose a Standard Channel that's offset the most from the Router's base frequency of 2.4ghz. This is usually channel 11 - 2.462ghz.

 

Wide Channel - Set to Auto.

 

Advanced Wireless Settings - This is where you'll normally find the settings for your signal strength and other important features. Make sure that all settings are set to their default, which are usually indicated. Note to make sure your signal strength is set to High.

 

Adapter Settings - Users always set up their Routers, but never think to setup their adapters accordingly to match their Router settings. To do this, open your Device Manager, then navigate to your adapter that you want to setup. Right click on it, then click on Properties, then Advanced. Go down the list and setup the adapter to match your Router settings. Make sure that your Adapter settings are also set to Mixed - it's a probable bet that they're somehow set to B, which is why you're getting such slow speeds. Try Mixed first - if your setup doesn't have a Mixed setting, then try N if all your devices are N capable.

 

If you're unfamiliar with network device setups, you can always call the device manufacturer's support line and they will be glad to help you set up your Router and help you with adapter connection issues.  It's always best to make sure your devices are registered with them first - they don't tend to want to help people who aren't registered users. Linksys will bend over backwards to help their customers - I've spent a lot of time with them when I was first getting up to speed on dual-band technology and setups, and they spent whatever time was necessary to help.

 

Also, the Network/Wireless troubleshooting solutions for your system are at this link: http://tinyurl.com/c2fgub

Primarily of the Ancient School -Training by HP, NASA, & the U.S. Submarine Force

HP Pavilion HDX 9300 64-bit Dragon, Core 2 Extreme X9000 2.8ghz | 8gb DDR2 RAM | 512MB 8800M GTS
Vista Ult. 64 | Linksys Dual-Band N Network | DriveSavers Agent | Wiki Answers Supervisor

"Professional Techs don't ask for Kudos or Points"

Tutor
firemanjd
Posts: 10
Member Since: ‎03-29-2009
Message 4 of 30 (44,133 Views)

Re: Wireless Does not seem to Connect at 802.11n speed

I have a dv7t with the Intel WiFi Link 5100 AGN network adapter. When I customized my computer I intentionaly upgraded to this adapter in order to have wireless N capability. I have a Linksys Wireless N router, but my computer is lonly connecting at wireless G speeds. I checked my adapter settings, and as far as I can tell wireless N is enabled. Then I set my router to N only, and my computer would no longer connect. I set the router back to Mixed and it reconnected, but still at G speeds. What's the deal?
Top Student
juniorck2k4
Posts: 5
Member Since: ‎03-30-2009
Message 5 of 30 (44,086 Views)

Re: Wireless Does not seem to Connect at 802.11n speed

I also have a HP DV7T laptop that was ordered with the Wireless N card that will not connect at wireless N speeds.  Before I got this laptop I had gotten a Belkin Wireless N router, and since my previous laptop (Acer aspire 5670) did not have built in wireless N I got one of those pcmcia cards (Belkin as well).

 

 With the pcmcia card the acer laptop would connect anywhere from 270 MBPS to 320 MBPS.  Ever since I got this HP laptop it will not connect any faster than 72MBPS.  I have tried the wireless card drivers from HP's site, and from intel's site.  I have also made sure that the BIOS had the most up to date firmware.  I contacted HP's support twice, and was supposed to get a call back from one of their "technical" people to troubleshoot the issue but I haven't gotten a response yet.  

 

I know about how if a device with a lower standard (ex. wireless g) connects to it that other devices will only be able to connect at that speed as well  I do have other devices connected to the router (which never caused any issues when I was using the Acer laptop).  But I went ahead and restored router to the default settings (the way it was when I got it), and made sure again that the firmware on the router was up to date.  With all of my other devices (PS3, XBOX 360, both wireless) turned off and the HP laptop the only thing connecting to it, it still only connects at 72MBPS.  I boot up my acer laptop (side by side with the HP laptop) and it connects at 270MBPS with no issues.

 

I have been researching this issue for a couple months now and cannot find a resolution.  I'm sure it is probably something simple that I am missing but I can't seem to find what I'm doing wrong.

 

 

Thanks in advanced for any responses.

Teacher
NoNoBadDog
Posts: 131
Member Since: ‎11-27-2008
Message 6 of 30 (44,082 Views)

Re: Wireless Does not seem to Connect at 802.11n speed

Junior;

 

   The theoretical limit on 802.11g is 54 Mbps, but real world speeds are usually in the 20-30 Mbps range.  The fact that your laptop is connecting at 72 Mbps shows clearly that it *is* connecting at 802.11n speed, buty why it shold be so slow is beyond me. 

 

72 Mbps is far above 802.11g speed, but very slow compared to what 802.11n can do. 

 

Did you try changning channels on the router?

 

You can also go into the advanced settings for the router and set it to "wide" mode...that may help.  You'll have to refer to your manual to find out how.

 

 

If this post has been helpful to you, please return the favor by clicking on the yellow KUDOS! icon in this box. Thank you! I'm not an HP employee, just someone trying to help others....
Top Student
juniorck2k4
Posts: 5
Member Since: ‎03-30-2009
Message 7 of 30 (44,078 Views)

Re: Wireless Does not seem to Connect at 802.11n speed

As far as I know there is no "wide" mode on the Belkin router.  It's also been suggested that I set the router to "N" mode only.  I cannot do that on this router (which I think is kind of dumb), but there are only 2 modes available, either B+G+N or no wireless at all.  It is obviously connecting at N speeds just not anywhere near what it should be.

 

I have gone on Belkin's website to see what I could find but didn't seem to find anything useful.

Teacher
NoNoBadDog
Posts: 131
Member Since: ‎11-27-2008
Message 8 of 30 (44,076 Views)

Re: Wireless Does not seem to Connect at 802.11n speed

Junior;

 

   I feel your frustration.  That is in large part why I never buy Belkin.  While Belkin may be attractive because of their lower prices, they do so at the expense of user friedlinness and flexibility of the router.  

 

Suggest your next router purchase be anything but Belkin.

 

 

If this post has been helpful to you, please return the favor by clicking on the yellow KUDOS! icon in this box. Thank you! I'm not an HP employee, just someone trying to help others....
Teacher
CyberVisions
Posts: 103
Member Since: ‎01-07-2009
Message 9 of 30 (44,116 Views)

Re: Wireless Does not seem to Connect at 802.11n speed

[ Edited ]

Firemanjd,

 

Network speed between a given system adapter and the network Router is determined by the slowest network device. If the Router is an N Router, then your adapter mode is set for G.

 

The problem is likely your Intel AGN Adapter settings - it's Wireless Mode is likely set to G, B/G, or A/B/G, but the N Mode setting probably isn't Enabled, which overrides the other Wireless Modes.

 

Prior to the procedures below, go to Linksys Support, look up your Router, then download the latest firmware update. If it's the same as what you have, then download that. Linksys Support Standard Procedure for any Linksys Router problem with speed or signal begins with flashing the firmware prior to adjusting any other settings. I've added settings for your Router to match your adapter since I have the same hardware.

 

You can look for your Router's firmware update here: Linksys Support

Enter your Model # and go from there to get the firmware update.

 

The following assumes you have a Linksys Single Band N Router; though these settings are from my Linksys WRT600N Dual-Band, the Admin Panel is the same, except for the extra 5ghz Band setup on mine. Just in case, I've also added the 5ghz settings. With these settings and the AGN or my Linksys WUSB600N DBN Adapter, I average better than 200mbps+, usually around 240 or 260mbps. The settings for the AGN adapter after these settings are matched for the Router settings.

 

On your Router:

 

Access the Router Admin Panel & Wireless Settings from your Browser - http://192.168.1.1/BasicWirelessSettings.htm

 

1. Click on the Administration link in the Admin Panel - it's on the right hand side.

2. At the very bottom, click on Backup Configurations -save the file to a convenient location on your drive. If you don't save your configuration, you'll have to setup your Router all over again if you've already made any custom changes. The flashing process restores the Router to its default configuration.

3. After backing up the configuration, click on Firmware Upgrade (top right under Administration)

4. Where it says Select a File to upgrade, browse to the update you downloaded, then start the flashing process (flash means install).

5. After the process is completed, and still under the Administration tab, click on the Management link on the left side.

6. At the bottom, click on Restore Configurations. Go to the file you backed up earlier.

7. Check the following are enabled (check box checked) - UPnP (Plug 'n Play).

8. If you wish to have the ability to change your Router settings from your notebook via wireless connection, enable the following under Management also:

Web Access - Enable both HTTP and Web Utility Access via Wireless.

Remote Access - Remote Management - Enabled, Web Utility Access - HTTP, Remote Upgrade - Disabled (enable if you want remote firmware upgrade

ability), Allow Remote IP Address - Any IP Address, Remote Management Port -8080.

UPnP - UPnP - Enabled, Allow Users to Configure - Enable, Allow Users to Disable Internet Access - Disabled.

 

Click on "Save Settings" at the bottom of the window, and wait for the Router to complete the save. If you don't and you go to another panel, the settings will have to be done again.

 

After that, click on the Wireless tab, and Basic Wireless Settings.

 

2.4ghz Wireless Settings

 

1. Network Mode: Wireless N

2. Network Name (SSID) - Set to a unique name that you can recognize. Enable in checkbox at the bottom to broadcast.

3. Radio Band - 20mhz Standard Channel

4. Wide Channel - Auto (DFS)

5. Standard Channel - Should be grayed out.

6. SSID Broadcast - Enabled

Having a unique SSID broadcasted ensure that you or your family won't accidentally connect to a neighbor's network that may have a Linksys Router, but didn't change the default SSID from "Linksys". With today's N routers and their ranges, it's easy to pick up another neighbor's network.

 

FOR DUAL-BAND WIRELESS N ROUTERS ONLY

 

5ghz Wireless Settings

 

1. Network Mode: Wireless N Only

2. Network Name (SSID) - Set to a unique name that you can recognize. Enable in checkbox at the bottom to broadcast.

3. Radio Band - 40mhz Wide Channel

4. Wide Channel - Auto (DFS)

5. Standard Channel - Should be grayed out.

6. SSID Broadcast - Enabled

 

Save the settings when complete.

 

Click on Advanced Wireless Settings on the right side.

 

I have my particular Router's AP Isolation Enabled (default is disabled) since I have a lot of network devices and electronics. If you click on the Help link, it will explain what it is. You determine if you wish to enable yours or not.

 

Other settings: Check their actual settings against the defaults listed next to them, especially the N Transmission Rate and Transmission Power. If you have Dual-Band, it's the same for both the 2.4ghz and 5ghz networks. If they're all at default, then click on Wireless Security (no need to save unless you make a change).

 

Wireless Security - I personally don't use any Encrypted Security because it causes multiple server drops during online gaming with N routers. Instead, I use MAC Address Filtering. If you want to use a Security setting, then use WPA2-Personal. Select AES for the encryption method, enter a passphrase (password), then save the settings. Set both to the same if you have a 5ghz network as well, unless you want to have 2 separate passwords. Remember that when you're done, you'll need to enter the passphrase into your Network Connection Profile on your notebook and any other system connecting to your Router. Save the changes.

 

When complete, click on Wireless MAC Filter.

 

Wireless MAC Filter - While you probably don't use this, I do instead of WPA2. What MAC filtering does is allow you to put every device on your network that you wish to have access to the Router on a list, using its MAC Address as the device ID. Once set, only devices on the filter will be able to have access to your network - any other systems or devices can't connect. All you need to do is to Enable the filter, and then add the MAC addresses for each device, including your systems, adapters, any wireless peripherals, etc. If you need help finding the MAC's for your notebook, go to your Control Panel, click on Performance and Tools, then Advanced Tools on the left column, then scroll down and click on View Advanced System Details in System Information.

translate_strWrite("WirelessNetworkAccess",6);In the System Info window, open out the System Summary tree, the click on the Components tree. Click again on Network, then Adapter. You'll have to scroll down, but you'll see all the MAC addresses - add them all. Make sure that under Access Restriction (top of filter list) that you enable "Permit PCs listed below access to the wireless network"

 

Save settings. Click on the Setup tab.

 

The following should be set:

 

1. Internet Connection Type - Automatic Configuration - DHCP

2. Optional Settings - Domain should already have your ISP domain information entered. MTU - Auto.

3. Router Address - s/b 192.168.1.1, which is the default for all Linksys Routers (and many other brands as well) but you can change it if you wish. Just remember what you change it to or you'll have to reset your Router to factory defaults.

4. DHCP Server - Enabled. Users - mine's set to 50, and my starting IP is 192.168.1.100. This is helpful if you run a PS3 or other devices and you want to separate their IP's into specific addresses that you want. For example, my PS3'd Dual-Band Adapter address is 192.168.1.75. If you have game console and want specific setups, let me know and I can give you those too.

5. Time Zone - wherever you live.

 

Save Settings. Click on Advanced Routing, ensure that NAT (Network Address Translation) is Enabled. Save Settings if needed.

 

Click on Applications and Gaming, then Quality of Service (QoS).

 

Using Quality of Service allows you to give an application or network device (e.g., an AGN adapter) priority access to the Router over other devices. This is good if you've got family that downloads a lot and you've got important things to do, like stream game data.:manwink:

 

1. Wireless - Set WMM Support to Enabled (default).

2. Internet Access Priority - Enabled.

3. Category - Select MAC Address.

4. Enter a Name - Intel Wi-Fi AGN

5. MAC Address - Enter your Adapter MAC address (remember you can get it from your System Information)

6. Priority - Medium

 

Click on Add. The new addition will show at the bottom.

 

Before closing the Admin Panel, go back to the Administration tab, and Backup your configurations again. This will save all of the changes you've just made, and allow you to restore them if you ever need to restore the Router to factory default settings in the future.

 

SETTING UP THE INTEL WI-FI AGN ADAPTER FOR A LINKSYS WIRELESS N ROUTER

 

If you weren't aware, the AGN adapter has its own diagnostic toolset. You can access them in the Network and Sharing window - look on the lower left column. It's titled Intel PROSet Wireless Tools. Run them to verify your adapter is working properly.

 

AGN Adapter Settings

 

There's a couple of ways to access the adapter properties:

 

1. Open your Control Panel, click on Network and Sharing, then Manage Wireless Networks. Click on Adapter Properties.

 

OR

 

2. Open your Device Manager, right click on the adapter, then click on Properties.

 

3. In the adapter Properties window, select the Advanced tab.

 

These settings are what I have set for my AGN adapter to run with my Linksys DB-N Router. I've added the Router settings to match for you below.

 

Check and adjust the following settings:

 

802.11n Channel Width - Set to 20mhz.

802.11n Mode - Set to "Enabled"

Ad Hoc Channel 802.11 b/g - 11

AH Power Management - User choice (Mine is Disabled)

AH Quality of Service (QoS) - WMM Enabled

Roaming Aggressiveness - Highest

Throughput Enhancement - Enabled

Transmit Power - Highest

Wireless Mode - Either 3, 4, 5, or 6 if N mode isn't enabled. When enabled, it doesn't matter.

 

Click Apply, then Okay. Restart your system and do a POR on your Router. Remember to keep it unplugged for at least 30 seconds before plugging it back in.

 

Go to Network and Sharing, then remove any existing profiles. Setup new ones, and connect to the Router. On the Network and Sharing window, click on Status to the right of the Connection label, then verify your network speed.

 

Additionally, you should know about 2 programs that Cisco/Linksys makes that are great for both Network Management and Speed monitoring. One is Network Magic Pro, the other is Speed Meter Pro. Both have full trial downloads, and if you buy them the each have 8 licenses apiece so that they may be installed on as many systems as needed. You can check both out at these links: Network Magic Pro Speed Meter Pro

I use both for different network management monitoring. SMP helps with both speed and will notify you if there's a problem with any device on the network. NMP allows you to setup sharing between systems and peripherals very easily. NMP is essentially a super version of the Linksys LELA Router management program. One feature I really like is the Network Map - it shows you at a glance your entire network, which devices/systems are currently connected or not, if there's any breaks and where they are, etc.

 

Hope all of the settings help. Let me know if you still have problems.

Message Edited by CyberVisions on 03-31-2009 02:33 AM
Primarily of the Ancient School -Training by HP, NASA, & the U.S. Submarine Force

HP Pavilion HDX 9300 64-bit Dragon, Core 2 Extreme X9000 2.8ghz | 8gb DDR2 RAM | 512MB 8800M GTS
Vista Ult. 64 | Linksys Dual-Band N Network | DriveSavers Agent | Wiki Answers Supervisor

"Professional Techs don't ask for Kudos or Points"

Teacher
CyberVisions
Posts: 103
Member Since: ‎01-07-2009
Message 10 of 30 (43,991 Views)

Re: Wireless Does not seem to Connect at 802.11n speed

Junior,

As I said in the post before this, your N adapter is likely not setup correctly. Check the long post I made - it has settings for both the adapter, and for a Linksys N Router. Hopefully you'll find something useful. 

Primarily of the Ancient School -Training by HP, NASA, & the U.S. Submarine Force

HP Pavilion HDX 9300 64-bit Dragon, Core 2 Extreme X9000 2.8ghz | 8gb DDR2 RAM | 512MB 8800M GTS
Vista Ult. 64 | Linksys Dual-Band N Network | DriveSavers Agent | Wiki Answers Supervisor

"Professional Techs don't ask for Kudos or Points"

† The opinions expressed above are the personal opinions of the authors, not of HP. By using this site, you accept the Terms of Use and Rules of Participation