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HP Workstation Z640 Upgrade Question

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HP Workstation Z640
Microsoft Windows 10 (64-bit)

Recently purchased the following:

HP Z640 Workstation E5-2620 V3 2.4GHz, 64GB PC4-2133 RAM, 256GB SSD, 2TB HDD, Quadro K4000

Would like to improve performance and thinking of replacing the CPU without changing RAM.  Need to keep the cost (new or used) below $350.  Which compatible processor would provide best bang for the buck?

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the  Xeon E5-2667 v3 8 Core 3.2GHz is about 200.00 USD on ebay

 

since you don't state WHAT you use the system for it's impossible to recommend a best cpu as some apps favor core count and others favor IPC, (IE-faster GHz)

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Bob-Sr,

 

The CPU choice is application dependent. In most applications today, except those that involve rendering or extremely high bandwidth data processing, the single-threaded- performance; the number of calculation cycles per unit time on one core is the primary concern. Adobe products are said to have peak efficiency at 5-8 cores (see the Puget Systems articles on the subject) and don't really use dual processors f. These days, I would suggest a single, higher clock speed E5-16XX v3 to dual E5-26XX v3's as a single CPU is of course less costly than two and, importantly, some 16XX v3's may be mildly overclocked . For that, consider an Xeon E5-16XX v3. If the system is for CAD without CPU rendering- consider a Xeon E5-1650 v3 6-core @ 3.5 / 3.8Ghz is a good one as it may be mildly overclocked. If there is rendering, it's on the GPU,  perhaps the E5-1660 v3 8-core and E5-1681 v3 10-core.  The Passmark CPU mark (calculation density)  averages 13629  and the single thread performance of the 1650 v3 averages 2149. The  E5-1681 v3 10-core (10C@ 2.9/ 3.5GHz CPU=18238 and Single Thread = 2017.  For comparison, CPU mark (calculation density)  of the current  E5-2620 V3 (6C@ 2.4 / 3.2GHz) averages 10019 and single thread is 1708- a substantial difference.  As the the number of cores increases, the single-thread performance is likely to decrease.

 

The point is, that for a single-processor system, consider staying with an E5-16XX v3 and choose according to the number of cores that are beneficial to the use.  If the system eventually is to have dual processors and running software that can use both processors, choose the highest Turbo clock speed  8-core E5-26XX. The E5-2667 v3 8-core@ 3.2/ 3.6GHz  is a good one; the Passmark average CPU Mark of 16001 and Single Thread is 2061.  A single one though may approach the $350. budget. Do not under any circumstances buy an "ES" or "QS" engineering sample.

 

Consider strongly leaning towards a single processor of 6 to 10 cores depending on the use and divert some budget to an upgraded GPU.  The Quadro K4000 is ranked 332 and has a Passmark 3D average of 2881.  Have a look at:

 

https://www.videocardbenchmark.net/gpu_list.php

 

Select rank to show the No. 1 3D rating at the top then enter "Quadro" into the search window and it will highlight all the Quadros in order.  Consider a Quadro K4200 4GB:  Rank= 178, 3D= 4480.  In the US, a K4200 about $120-150 these days (3.20).  Of course, the Quadro K4000 sale can subsidize the new GPU to some proportion, perhaps up to half.

 

BambiBoomZ

 

HP z620_2 (2017) (R7) > Xeon E5-1680 v2 (8C@ 4.3GHz) / z420 Liquid Cooling / 64GB (HP/Samsung 8X 8GB DDR3-1866 ECC registered/ Quadro P2000 5GB _ GTX 1070 Ti 8GB / HP Z Turbo Drive M.2 256GB AHCI + Samsung 970 EVO M.2 NVMe 500GB + HGST 7K6000 4TB / Focusrite Scarlett 2i4 sound interface + 2X Mackie MR824 / 825W PSU /> HP OEM Windows 7 Prof.’l 64-bit > 2X Dell Ultrasharp U2715H (2560 X 1440)

[ Passmark Rating = 6280 / CPU rating = 17178 / 2D = 819 / 3D= 12629 / Mem = 3002 / Disk = 13751 / Single Thread Mark = 2368 [10.23.18]

 

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Thank you all for the responses.  This was both helpful and educational.

Is there a way to tell from the manufacturers software web site, how many cores and threads a particular application will use? Also, what software will make use of a second CPU in the 640 workstation?

Thank you ... Bob-Sr

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Bob-SR,

 

Software companies often publish a "System Requirements" list and some  will make general or specific hardware recommendations. For example, Autodesk:

 

https://knowledge.autodesk.com/certified-graphics-hardware?siteID=123112&id=18844534&results=1&stype...

 

Autodesk is so specific that using non-certified- tested /approved hardware may from their standpoint release them from product support.

 

There are quite a number of very good articles on the Puget System site:

 

https://www.pugetsystems.com/all_articles.php

 

 

If there are not comments on the specific software, there may well be useful information for the general use, e.g., recommendations fro Adobe Premiere may be applicable to general video editing. Other software is specialized in certain ways; A GTX Card may work reasonably in Revit, but only up to a point in project size, but for Solidworks it needs to very OpenGL oriented, meaning a Quadro.  A medium end Quadro will be faster in SW than an RTX 2080.

 

It takes time, but do a lot of research into the hardware /software relationship.  In general though, 3D CAD is highly single threaded oriented while rendering may be CPU-core count dependent for example Blender and VRay, but will also benefit from GPU acceleration- CUDA cores. As I use 3D CAD, Ray-tracing rendering, photo editing, and technical publishing application mostly, I use an 8-core Xeon overclocked to 4.3GHz om all cores and (formerly) with a Quadro P2000, GTX 1070 Ti,, and fast M.2 drives, tried to create a fast general-purpose system. 

 

It takes some study but one can't go too far wrong with a fast 8 core, lots of RAM - at least 32GB an RTX 2060 or higher if the software uses viewports, a Quadro P4000 or Quadro RTX 4000 (my next purchase).

 

I recommend downloading the free trial of Passmark Performance Test and do a search for z620 by each test parameter: CPU- by number of cores, GPU, RAM, Disk, and see what parts do well in a z620.  Then check the specs of the CPU on the Passmark CPU page for the no. of cores, clock speeds and single thread performance:

 

https://www.cpubenchmark.net/CPU_mega_page.html

 

>, Intel ARK, then the GPU in the Passmark listed ratings

 

https://www.videocardbenchmark.net/gpu_list.php

 

>, and so on.

 

BambiBoomZ

 

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Thank you for the additional information.  I took your advice and reviewed performance of different CPUs on CPUBoss, now awaiting delivery of E5-1680 v3 3.2GHz from ebay seller.  Starting to investigate coolers in anticipation of overclocking.  Appears overclocking at 4.3GHz requires a water cooler ... any information on successful cooling solutions is welcomed. Thanks again! 

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