• ×
    Information
    Need Windows 11 help?
    Check documents on compatibility, FAQs, upgrade information and available fixes.Windows 11 Support Center.
  • post a message
  • ×
    Information
    Need Windows 11 help?
    Check documents on compatibility, FAQs, upgrade information and available fixes.Windows 11 Support Center.
  • post a message
HP Recommended
HP Z420
Microsoft Windows 10 (64-bit)

I bought a Liquid Cooling Assembly (P/N: 647289-001) from eBay for my Z420. However, the item arrived in an unexpected shape: Soaked in liquid (see photos). I am guessing it was poorly packaged and being shaken during the ride caused the fluid loss. 
The question is: What do I do now? Is there a way to assess its functionality other than plugging it in? More importantly, is there any way to fill it up again? 

IMG_20190212_091626.jpgIMG_20190212_091638.jpg

1 ACCEPTED SOLUTION

Accepted Solutions
HP Recommended

Diamantius,

 

I can only think that to break the pump body that the cooler was mounted on a CPU without tightening the mounting bolts in an even way; that put an extreme torsion on the pump body and cracked it.

 

I'd say, emphatically, that the proper solution is to return the unit to the sender for refund. It is not fair to the buyer to pay for a component and have to spend time and money to make it work.  Anyway, a new pump body would probably cost more than a complete working unit.

 

BambiBoomZ

View solution in original post

31 REPLIES 31
HP Recommended

Diamantius,

 

Consider sending the photos in the post to the seller, request a return label be sent, and return the item for a refund or replacement.

 

Those cooling units are quite rugged and having ever had fluid loss would  make that unit an unacceptable risk as a future leak might destroy the computer.

 

The z420 liquid cooler is well-designed; compact and notice the small fan for the chipset- built and very effective.  I use a z420  cooler in a z620:

 

z620_2_z420 Liquid Cooler_w Shroud_7.3.17.jpg

 

That simply plugs in and allows a Xeon E5-1680 v2 run on all 8-cores @ 4.3GHz, idling at 29-33C and never rising over 73C, where the 1680 v2 is rated to 85C.

 

BambiBoomZ

 

 

HP z620_2 (2017) (R7) > Xeon E5-1680 v2 (8-core@ 4.3GHz) / z420 Liquid Cooling / 64GB DDR3-1866 ECC Reg / Quadro P2000 5GB _ GTX 1070 Ti 8GB / HP Z Turbo Drive M.2 256GB AHCI + Samsung 970 EVO M.2 NVMe 500GB + HGST 7K6000 4TB / Focusrite Scarlett 2i4 sound interface + 2X Mackie MR824 / 825W PSU /> HP OEM Windows 7 Prof.’l 64-bit > 2X Dell Ultrasharp U2715H (2560 X 1440)

 

HP Recommended

Hi BambiBoomZ,
Thanks for your response. Your feedback throughout this forum has greatly informed my decision to buy a z420 and a 1650v2 along with the Liquid Cooler (XTU adventure next, hehe).
You are totally right; I have already contacted the seller to inform them of the matter and discuss options.
However, being the curious and stubborn head that I am, I went ahead and dismantled the thing, in order to try and see where the leak was. There don't seem to be any cracks anywhere, so I am guessing the leak came from the rubber tubing. I will attempt to repair the thing, by replacing the tubes with new ones and refill the circuit with premixed coolant. I have already cleaned the radiator with distilled water, so we'll just wait and see.
I will report back with my findings!

HP Recommended

Diamantius,

 

Radiator leaks that are mysterious are the worst leaks as radiators may hold fluid perfectly well- until they are under pressure. 

 

I think that to be safe, it is necessary to pressure test the radiator and connections.  The only way I can think to do that on a closed loop cooler is to remove radiator inlet hose and arrange a pump connection and remove the waterblock outlet end and arrange a pressure gauge.  Find the operating pressure spec, fill with fluid and apply that pressure- and a bit more and see if fluid comes out anywhere.  It could be the radiator or the connections. Either way, it's a very dangerous device!

 

I see in the photo you have steam radiators (reminds me of life in the UK!) and perhaps a sympthetic heating shop would look into the situation.

 

The z420 /E5-1650 v2 combination running XTU is a fantastic cost/performance value. With the liquid cooling solved I can imagine a reliable 4.1GHz on all 6-cores- perhaps 4.2 or even 4.3 with more voltage and if the temperatures are still reasonble.  I ran a z420/ E5-1660 v2 comportably at 4.2GHz and in some ways wish I'd never sold that one.

 

BambiBoomZ

 

 

HP Recommended

That's a fantastic idea! I will start looking to see if I can find the operating specs anywhere on the internet. 

HP Recommended

Should I do the same on the water block/pump end?

HP Recommended

The HP liquid coolers were built for HP by a known independent company that if you dig deep enough you'll be able to find their name.  I used to know..... Anyway, once you have that you can contact their support people and perhaps get an answer.  If you do please pass that on here.

HP Recommended

I will try and do that. I'll report everything here 🙂

HP Recommended

Found them. It's Asetek. 
https://www.asetek.com/company/milestones/

HP Recommended

Bad news. Asetek haven't replied yet, but I went ahead and tested the radiator and the block using a gauge and a manual pump taken from an old sphygmomanometer. The radiator is fine, no air leaks even at high pressure. However, the pump is apparently cracked:

<iframe src="https://drive.google.com/file/d/1oxMVacVkyk8EQ-AtGb71OvnhP0IcQGiu/preview" width="640" height="480"></iframe>
Should I even bother looking for just that part?

† The opinions expressed above are the personal opinions of the authors, not of HP. By using this site, you accept the <a href="https://www8.hp.com/us/en/terms-of-use.html" class="udrlinesmall">Terms of Use</a> and <a href="/t5/custom/page/page-id/hp.rulespage" class="udrlinesmall"> Rules of Participation</a>.