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agdodge4x4
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Which machine is 'better'?

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Z800 Z820
Microsoft Windows 10 (64-bit)

I'm trying to decide between two machines here and the cost is not an issue.  I have two but I am not sure about the ins and outs of the processors.

 

Z820 with Dual E5-2609 Processors and 128GB of memory

 

Z800 with Dual X5550 Processors and 96GB of memory

 

Regardless of what these are used for, lets assume they are being taxed, which of these machines is the faster or better machine?

 

At first blush the X5550 looks a lot beefier due to virtual processors, is that true?

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banhien
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@agdodge4x4

 

I definetely buy the newer z820. If you wish to compare, please use the following document

 

   http://h20331.www2.hp.com/Hpsub/downloads/Z820vsZ800_WhitePaper.pdf

 

Regards.

BH
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agdodge4x4
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What about in terms of processing power between teh processors.  the X5550 has 8 threads vs. the E5-2609, which has 4.  Does that matter?  I am trying to gain a better understanding of the hardware.  Everything about the Z820 I posted here SEEMS better except the processors.  But...is that true?  

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banhien
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@agdodge4x4 wrote:

... the X5550 has 8 threads vs. the E5-2609, which has 4.  Does that matter?  I am trying to gain a better understanding of the hardware.  Everything about the Z820 I posted here SEEMS better except the processors.  


Hi,

 

I don't know how you compare those two. The following article will tell you more

 

    http://www.cpu-world.com/Compare/932/Intel_Xeon_E5-2609_vs_Intel_Xeon_X5550.html

 

You can always change/upgrade (supported) CPU on those machines.

 

Regards.

BH
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SDH
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You likely do not know that there are two versions of both the Z800 and the Z820.  Comparing a version 1 Z800 to a version 2 Z820 would be 4 generations apart, not two.

 

In BIOS there is a listing towards the very beginning of the "Boot Block Date" and that lets you know which version they are.  That info is all here in the forum.

 

I update processors in our HP workstations... very inexpensive in the Z800 to do that, used from eBay.  So, for me, I want the slowest processor in the most recent workstation I can find because I'll chuck the original anyway.

 

Other things to consider:  The ZX00 generation are SATA generation II workstations whereas the Z820s are SATA generation III.  The Z820 can run faster memory than the Z800 expecially if you have a matching fast processor.

 

Overall the Z800 version 2 is an excellent choice for someone on a tight budget who is willing and able to upgrade to the very fastest processors that can run.  The Z820 version 2 is more expensive used but can run some very fine and very fast processors.  The Z820 with a version 1 motherboard is still better than a Z800 with a version 2 motherboard assuming you have maxed out both in terms of processors and RAM speeds.  The extra RAM speed is actually quite the nice thing to have.

 

Z820 has on-motherboard USB3.... Z800 does not.

 

All the info is in here..... you'll need to dig it out.  Depending on your computer skills you can create a very excellent HP workstation for a reasonable price, but it is always nice to buy the most recent generation if money is not of concern.

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DGroves
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i own a z800 (rev2) and z820 systems and since you said cost is not a  consideration then the z820 wins hands down

 

due to a faster memory subsystem, more ram , native usb 3.0 and pci-e 3.0

 

not to mention that the z820 can be equiped with faster cpu's that also have more cores

 

 

while the z800 rev 2 boards can use 55xx/56xx series xeons unlike the rev 1 boards that are 55xx only.

 

the older cpu's while faster in IPC (Instructions Per Cycle) in your example are not that much faster than E-5 2609 due to cpu improvements, and even  if the software can make use of the z800's 8 cores it's upgrade options are very limited

 

this is not to say a z800 is a bad system, just that if you are buying a system nowadays the z820 offers a better long term value

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agdodge4x4
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I did not know there were two versions.  My 820 is a 12/28/2011 Boot Block Date which I believe makes it a version 1.  So if I want to replace the dual E5-2609 processors with a dual 8 core, I can just hit up the quick specs and get whatever one I want that fits, will work with version 1, and is in my price range on ebay....or is there more to it than that?  I have 128GB of memory on this machine.  If so, where do I look to find the drop in processors that work with V1 boards?

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agdodge4x4
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I'm having a bit of trouble locating a spec sheet specific to my V1 machine (assuming that's what it is with a 2011 boot block date).

 

Basically, I want to replace my dual E5-2609 with something a bit more beefy, but not crazy expensive.  Less than $200 would be OK.  These machines are my own that were purchased recently.  I guess I'd like to throw in an 8 core processor, but I'd like it to be a simple upgrade....as in...buy it, take out the old, put in the new, grease it, turn it on and go.  If I could get away with not even updating the BIOS, that would be great.

 

Can I accomplish what I want with a Pair of E5-2650 procs?  They should work on my board,  and plug and play?

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DGroves
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what software are you planing to run? this is quite important because unless the software supports multi cpu's  installing

 

a single or dual 8 core cpu is rather pointless

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agdodge4x4
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Well, these 820's may get used for CAD work, Photo Editing, Data Science use, etc.  Could be anything.  My presumption is that software to be used can and does take advantage of multicore, multiproc hardware.  

 

What I don't know is my power supply, but it really doesn't matter for the E5-2650 or E5-2660.  Both are about 100 bucks a pair and both will work with the base level power supply and both will be a considerable upgrade over the E5-2609 Processor.

 

Right?

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