cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 
The HP Calculator Community Message Board is moving. While we prepare for the move, we are unable to accept new postings. During the move, you can look for help from other users by visiting https://www.hpmuseum.org/ . Or if you need technical support for your calculator visit: HP Calculators. .
radu3
Level 2
22 13 0 0
Message 1 of 7
440
Flag Post

hp z600 - does X5647 need high perfomance heatsinks? it's 130W

HP Recommended
hp z600
Microsoft Windows 10 (32-bit)

Hi!

 

I'd just received a hp z600 with 2 x5647 in it. I was expecting to see performance heat-sinks in it since this CPU is a 130W... instead, I got 2 mainstream heat-sinks...

 

Is it ok to have this configuration? Will the mainstream heat-sinks cope with 130W? Should I return the PC back to shop?

Is it ok not to receive any visual/audio warnings when the system boots and the OS is loading? (I would expect a message something like this: mainstream heat-sink on high TDP CPU - I remember I received something like this on one of my hp z800)

 

TA!

R

6 REPLIES 6
itsmyname
Level 8
2,648 2,630 95 283
Message 2 of 7
Flag Post
HP Recommended

Is this your computer: HP Z600 Workstation Product Specifications | HP® Customer Support

 

It was designed for Windows Vista, and has the rarer "ECC" RAM.

Note that it has "3-channel" RAM architecture. So, having THREE sticks of RAM gives the best performance.

 

If it has lasted this long with the standard heat-sinks, you have nothing to worry about.

 

If you are worried about "global warming" and "heat domes", see if you can fit an additional fan somewhere inside the case, to increase the (cooling) air-flow.

 

 

Was this reply helpful? Yes No
radu3
Author
Level 2
22 13 0 0
Message 3 of 7
Flag Post
HP Recommended

Hi Itsmyname,

 

You didn't understood the question:

- most CPUs supported by gen 2 HP z600 are 80W to 95W; these CPUs require the mainstream cooling solution (i.e. 535586-001/463990-001) -  I have these heat-sinks (HS from now on) on my PC

- the other supported CPUs are 130W and they need a bigger HS (the so called high performance HSs 535588-001/463991-001) - I have this sort of CPU but ... is my cooling suitable? (this was my question)

 

I know what RAMs and OSes are supported, my question was solely on the cooling solution - you don't take the cooler of motorcycle (the mainstream cooling) and try to cool down a Bugatti (x5647, x5690 et al.).

 

Now I'm also aware the fact that modern CPUs will understand that they don't have a decent cooling, and try to work at lower speeds. But this is not my intention: I want these CPUs 100% all year long.

 


If it has lasted this long with the standard heat-sinks, you have nothing to worry about.

I have no idea if the shop employes just brainstorm and created the pc from parts, watched a movie on youtube and declared the configuration workable. If this 130W CPU can be cooled down by a standard HS, I would expect HP to not be able to sell any of the HighPerformance HS (they are way expensive and nobody would had bought them)

 

TA

R

Was this reply helpful? Yes No
radu3
Author
Level 2
22 13 0 0
Message 4 of 7
Flag Post
HP Recommended

Hi Itsmyname,

 

You didn't understood my question:

- most CPUs supported by Z600 gen2 are 80W and 95W. These CPUs require/can be cooled down by the mainstream heat sinks (HS from now on): 535586-001/463990-001. I get 2 of these HS in my PC.

- the other CPUs are 130W and required bigger HS (the so called high performance HS - 535588-001/463991-001). My 2 x5647 CPUs are of this type.

 

My initial questions were whether these HS will cope with these CPUs? Is this a valid configuration? Why don't I get any warnings?

 

The link you'd provided is for the same PC but generation 1; not generation 2 which I have; I know what RAM and OSes are supported.

 


If it has lasted this long with the standard heat-sinks, you have nothing to worry about.


I have no idea if the guys from the shop just brainstormed this configuration, watched a movie on youtube and then declared this configuration a valid one.

 

Also, I'm aware that modern CPUs know if they don't have a decent cooling solution and try to work on lower speeds, so that they are dissipating less heat, but I want AND NEED my CPUs 100% all year long ... it's not acceptable to cool down a Bugatti (x5647) with a motorcycle HS (the mainstrem HS).

 

TA

R

Was this reply helpful? Yes No
SDH
Level 10
2,360 2,186 220 672
Message 5 of 7
Flag Post
HP Recommended

Mainstream.jpgZ600 Z800 Performance heatsink-fan.jpgThe 130W max TDP processors were supposed to be run under the larger custom engineered "Performance" heatsink/fan which is physically bigger, has significantly more cooling fin surface area, and 3 instead of 2 heat tubes..

 

Those special larger heatsinks were used in the Z600 and Z800 workstations when higher wattage processors were used.  

 

The wiring on the fan's plug end indicated to the motherboard whether a "Mainstream" or a higher rated Performance heatsink was attached.  HP used a white 5-hole fan plug end with holes 1->4 occupied by the standard 4 wires of the PWM fans for the Mainstream heatsinks.  If the heatsink/fan was a Performance type HP added in a ground jumper wire at the plug end from pin 1 to pin 5.  That was the only way the motherboard knew it had the bigger option.

 

However, once you knew this secret you could add that jumper wire in yourself to spoof the motherboard, or swap in HP fans that were already wired that way.  I would not advise doing that, but some people who were just checking their email or surfing the net probably did that and got away with it.

 

Take a look on eBay to see more pictures of what a regular Mainstream Z600 looks like vs the Performance Z600 one (which are hard to find and quite expensive these days).  And be careful to know exactly what the Mainstream and Performance part numbers are for.  I've seen eBay sellers get their descriptions wrong and try to sell other ones as official for these ZX00 workstations.  Just today I saw a Performance version with some correct and some incorrect pictures in the same ad... some of the pics showed a heatsink with only 2 heat tubes.  The real Performance heatsinks for the ZX00 workstations all had 3 heat tubes.

 

Finally, the Z400 used a big bulky Performance heatsink/fan that will not reliably fit in the Z600... it might fit in a Z800 but I never tried that.

Was this reply helpful? Yes No
BambiBoomZ
Level 7
725 651 46 190
Message 6 of 7
Flag Post
HP Recommended

Radu3,

 

Given the greater processing demands today as compared to the time of z600's making, the upgraded heatsinks are dytongly advisable and absolutely required  if there is any CPU-based, or ray tracing rendering.

 

Consider downloading, installing and running HWMonitor which will report the minimum maximum and current temperatures at each core. Then start and  run a benchmark that runs all cores at 100%. this will tell an interesting story one way or the other.

 

Here are results running a 4K ray-tracing rendering  on a Xeon E5-1650 v2 (6C @ 4.4GHz) on all cores at 4.2GHz (z620  w/ z420 AIO liquid cooling):

 

z620_2_REN CLK_Temps_6.5.21.jpg

And I would like the maximum temperatures to be at least 8-10C less and the start up at 140W is not acceptable. Since that, the system is running at 4.3 on all cores at lower added voltage and the 100% load all core speed is 4.1.

 

The Xeon X5647 specs:

 

https://ark.intel.com/content/www/us/en/ark/products/52580/intel-xeon-processor-x5647-12m-cache-2-93...

 

> list the package temperature rating at 80C and given that same die size (LGA1366) was also used for 6-core processors the X5647 is running at 2.83 /3.2GHz=other LGA run at up to 3.6 and 3.86.

 

I always err on the sides of caution and suggest that  consider using the uprated coolers anyway. If the system wanted to go to a pair of X5680  6C@ 3.33/3.6GHz  or X5687 4C @ 3.6/ 3.86GHz the cooling would be covered.

 

BambiBoomZ

 

HP z620_2 (2017) (R9) > Xeon E5-1650 v2 (6C@ 4.4GHz) / z420 Liquid Cooling / 64GB (HP/Samsung 8X 8GB DDR3-1866 ECC registered) /GTX 1070 Ti 8GB / Samsung SM951 M.2 512GB AHCI + Samsung 970 EVO M.2 NVMe 500GB + HP/HGST Enterprise 6TB / Focusrite Scarlett 2i4 sound interface + 2X Mackie MR824 / 825W PSU / Windows 7 Prof.’l 64-bit (HP OEM) > 2X Dell Ultrasharp U2715H (2560 X 1440)
[ Passmark Rating = 6148 / CPU rating = 15952 / 2D = 787 / 3D= 13077 / Mem = 3045 / Disk = 15506 / Single Thread Mark = 2425 [5.20.21]

 

HP z420_3: (2015) (R12) Xeon E5-1650 v2 (6C@ 4.3GHz) / z420 Liquid cooling / 64GB (HP/Samsung 8X 8GB DDR3-1866 ECC registered) / NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1060 6GB/ Samsung SM951 M.2 256GB AHCI + Samsung 860 EVO 500GB + HGST 7K6000 4TB / ASUS Essence STX + Logitech z2300 2.1 / 600W PSU > Windows 7 Professional 64-bit (HP OEM ) > Samsung 40" 4K
[Passmark System Rating: = 5947 / CPU = 15268 / 2D = 773 / 3D = 11025 / Mem = 2931 Disk = 15530 /Single Thread Mark = 2383 [5.3.21]

Was this reply helpful? Yes No
radu3
Author
Level 2
22 13 0 0
Message 7 of 7
Flag Post
HP Recommended

Hi guys,

 

Thank you all, for your detailed (as always) answers, and sorry for giving you too much to write/type. I was hopping just for some yes/no answers, but it's ok, the way it is now.

 

Now, I'm not pretty comfortable in getting the CPUs up to 100% with the current heat sinks, so I'll return the PC to the shop, and wait for another occasion (and hopefully a better one).😀

 

Thank you!

All the very best!

Radu

 

 

Was this reply helpful? Yes No
Warning Be alert for scammers posting fake support phone numbers and/or email addresses on the community. If you think you have received a fake HP Support message, please report it to us by clicking on "Flag Post".
† The opinions expressed above are the personal opinions of the authors, not of HP. By using this site, you accept the Terms of Use and Rules of Participation