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Level 6
305 297 32 76
Message 31 of 34
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Yes, you understand it correctly.

 

You can find the csolve command via: Toolbox - Cas - Solve - Complex Solve and view its Help and examples.

In the Help the second argument is between square brackets which means it is not always needed.

In faxt, when the variable is x, can can omit it.

 

Expr could be for example x^4=1.

 

But you could also store this equation in eg variable g1,like

g1:= x^4-1,

and write:

 

csolve(g1)

 

I saw that in entering matrices it is also possible to use the arrow keys.

It think you were used to use the space key because, when I remember well, this is the way to create similar objects in RPN mode of eg the HP50g.

 

I do not like the displayal in Textbook mode of vectors because you do not see the comma's, and it is not always clear where one element ends and the other begins.

It was not very clear in your matrix either.

 

It can be necessary to switch to Algebraic mode to see them clearly.

 

The Displayal in History can be changed from Textbook to Algebraic in the second page of Home settings.

When you encouter problems this can be very useful.

 

 

 

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Level 3
44 34 2 1
Message 32 of 34
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Once again, you are correct: It was my familiarity (I really knew it pretty well) with the HP48 that led me astray here. With the 48, I did everything in RPN.  I miss that machine.  Your point about Algebraic notation is noted.  I find the 'help' on the calculator and in the manual not excellent.  Unfortunate, as the  Prime has some counter-intuitive stuff, but on the other hand, I see that it is possible to overcome the obstacles (with a little help from your friends), and no doubt this calculator can do things the 48-50 series could not. 

 

Back in the glory days of the 48GX, there was a book written by Chris Coffin: "An Easy Guide to Programming the HP48"  It was a masterpiece.

 

I wonder if he's around if he would consider writing a book about the Prime?  Maybe I'll start a new string "Calling Chris Coffin."  🙂

 

Elad

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Author
Level 3
44 34 2 1
Message 33 of 34
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Guess what? I tried the function 'solve'

 

solve(m2(2,4)=0,u2)

 

That also gave me the correct answer.

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Level 6
305 297 32 76
Message 34 of 34
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I suppose that in CAS settings you have checked Complex or Use i

When I do this I also get a result with Solve.

 

On my calculator I had not checked them and did not get a result.

 

The default setting is that they are not checked.

Tim advises not to change the CAS settings because it can cause problems.

Of course you can do it in special cases but it seems good to me not to forget to reset them when you do not need them anymore.

 

When you might want to reset a certain page of the CAS settings you can press Shift - Clear.

 

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