cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 
Brasil360
Level 2
12 7 3 0
Message 1 of 10
8,870
Flag Post

Solved!

HP Prime - programming language?!

HP Recommended

Hello there,

Does any one knows what kind of programming language the "HP Prime graphing calculator" uses?

 

I would like to learn how to programme a few Apps if possible!

 

Is any where I can find instructions?

 

Thanks.

0 Kudos
1 ACCEPTED SOLUTION

Accepted Solutions
Brasil360
Author
Level 2
12 7 3 0
Message 2 of 10
Flag Post
HP Recommended

Below is a link to the HP Prime website  which answers to my own question, might be hady for the others may have the same one: www.hp-prime.de

 

on this page can be found other tuturials in this matter and other usefull stuff.

 

Good luck!

View solution in original post

0 Kudos
9 REPLIES 9
Brasil360
Author
Level 2
12 7 3 0
Message 2 of 10
Flag Post
HP Recommended

Below is a link to the HP Prime website  which answers to my own question, might be hady for the others may have the same one: www.hp-prime.de

 

on this page can be found other tuturials in this matter and other usefull stuff.

 

Good luck!

View solution in original post

0 Kudos
Joe_Horn
Level 8
640 627 121 214
Message 3 of 10
Flag Post
HP Recommended

FYI, your Prime comes with a User Guide which answers your question handily.  The "HP PPL" programming language is documented on pages 492-574 in the current version.  To make sure you have the most recent User Guide, run the Emulator (also known as the "HP Prime Virtual Calculator"), let it upgrade itself to the most recent version (Windows menu: Calculator / Check for Update), and then select Help / User Guide in its Windows menu.

-Joe-
0 Kudos
mu271314
New member
5 2 0 0
Message 4 of 10
Flag Post
HP Recommended

As per wiki:

 

 ...[A] Pascal-like programming language now named HP PPL (for Prime Programming Language)}...

 

0 Kudos
Jenab6
New member
4 2 0 0
Message 5 of 10
Flag Post
HP Recommended

What I usually do when learning a new machine coding language is study examples of other people's programs. Then I go and write one of my own.

 

Here's an app that I wrote a few days ago. It's purpose is to help amateur astronomers determine the orbits of any asteroids that they might discover, so that they can use the numbers (called orbital elements) to find the asteroid again at some later time.

 

See the source code of ORBIT4 (warning: linear algebra ahead). Download a free executable copy of ORBIT4. To do the file transfer, you'll need the HP Connectivity Kit. If you don't own a physical HP Prime Calculator, you can download the HP Prime Virtual Calculator Emulator. Test data for ORBIT4, for those who don't do telescopes, can be found at JPL Horizons.

 

Example using test input. Here's the input, copied from inline code in ORBIT4. (For a different object or a different time, the user would alter the data within the program. Reason? It is too much data to enter via a INPUT command.

 

// Data for time 1
L1:=
{2457204.625,
0.155228396,
−1.004732775,
0.00003295786,
HMS→(20°46′57.02″),
HMS→(−27°41′33.9″)};

// Data for time 2
L2:=
{2457214.625,
0.319493277,
−0.965116604,
0.0000311269,
HMS→(20°39′57.10″),
HMS→(−28°47′21.5″)};

// Data for time 3
L3:=
{2457224.625,
0.4747795623,
−0.8983801739,
0.00002841127,
HMS→(20°31′22.81″),
HMS→(−29°49′22.7″)};

// Data for time 4
L4:=
{2457234.625,
0.616702829,
−0.8063620175,
0.00002486325,
HMS→(20°22′06.57″),
HMS→(−30°41′57.3″)};

 

For each time of observation, the data are

 

{The time of observation in Julian Date form,

the X component of Earth's position in astronomical units, in heliocentric ecliptic coordinates,

the Y component of Earth's position in astronomical units, in heliocentric ecliptic coordinates,

the Z component of Earth's position in astronomical units, in heliocentric ecliptic coordinates,

the observed right ascension of the asteroid, as an argument in HH°MM'SS"

the observed declination of the asteroid, as an argument, in dd°mm'ss"}

 

The time of observation should be accurate to 0.0001 days (or better). The components of Earth's position should be given with at least six significant figures. The right ascension of the asteroid should be accurate to 0.01 seconds. The declination should be accurate to 0.1 arcsec.

 

The times of observation should be spaced about 0.5% to 1% of the asteroid's orbital period, or up to 3% of the period for the total interval from time 1 to time 4. The total observation interval should occur near an opposition of the asteroid with the sun, but it should not span an apside of the asteroid's orbit. (There will be reduced accuracy in the output it that happens.)

 

And now here's the output.

 

ORBIT4 by David Sims
Method of Gauss with four observed positions
to find the Keplerian orbital elements.
User provides input by adjusting inline data.

r₁ 2.75 (initial guess)
r₄ 2.75 (initial guess)

Successive approximations
r₁ 2.90652064 r₄ 2.92071388
r₁ 2.93008666 r₄ 2.94292188
r₁ 2.93307059 r₄ 2.94572742
r₁ 2.93344165 r₄ 2.94607627
r₁ 2.93348769 r₄ 2.94611956
r₁ 2.9334934 r₄ 2.94612492
r₁ 2.93349411 r₄ 2.94612559
r₁ 2.9334942 r₄ 2.94612567
r₁ 2.93349421 r₄ 2.94612568
r₁ 2.93349421 r₄ 2.94612568

Heliocentric distances in AU at t₁ & t₄
r₁ 2.93349421
r₄ 2.94612568

Geocentric distances in AU at t₁ & t₄
ρ₁ 2.00460681
ρ₄ 1.94781669

HEC positions in AU at t₁ & t₄
x₁ 1.33687069
y₁ −2.2463475
z₁ −1.33119794
x₄ 1.58994315
y₄ −2.10289848
z₄ −1.31512559

Aberration corrections to time
Aρ₁ 0.011577643 days
Aρ₄ 0.011249651 days

Epoch of state vector & obliquity
t₀ 2457219.61 JD
ε₀ 0.409057547 radians

HEC state vector
x₀ 1.46520344 AU
y₀ −2.52458426 AU
z₀ −0.349479243 AU
Vx₀ 14610.4367 m/s
Vy₀ 7967.42879 m/s
Vz₀ −2442.63758 m/s

Heliocentric distance
r 2.93980995 AU

Sun−relative speed
v 16819.9661 m/s

True anomaly 147.669798°
Ecc. anomaly 145.259666°
Mean anomaly 142.77737°

Period of orbit 1681.12408 days

Orbital elements
a 2.76694735 AU
e 0.076026341
i 10.5918141°
Ω 80.3183813°
ω 72.6265868°
T 2456552.87 JD
T+P 2458234 JD

For comparison, the orbit of asteroid 1 Ceres for 2457219.61 JD from JPL Horizons.

a 2.768008676 AU
e 0.075773357
i 10.59221734°
Ω 80.32683297°
ω 72.66267214°
T 2456552.644 JD
P 1682.091 days

 

Pretty close, huh?

0 Kudos
Tags (1)
Maké
Level 9
3,551 3,490 180 543
Message 6 of 10
Flag Post
HP Recommended

Hi!, @Brasil360 :

 

Do you really want to learn how to use your HP PRIME properly ?.

 

Here you have, a complete Guide for Symbolic Computation and Mathematics, by Renée De Graeve ... https://www-fourier.ujf-grenoble.fr/~parisse/hp-prime_cas.pdf

Kind Regards !.
Have a nice day !.
@Maké (Technical Advisor Premium - HP Program Top Contributor).
Provost in HP Spanish Public Forum ... https://h30467.www3.hp.com/
HeyJoeJoe
Level 1
6 5 0 1
Message 7 of 10
Flag Post
HP Recommended

These are great programs but they dont work on my HP Prime G2,

EXPORT ddd()

BEGIN

 

 

(p):=

 

LOCAL n,l; l:=NULL;

n:=0;

WHILE n <=p DO l:=l,n; n:=n+1;

END; RETURN l; END;

0 Kudos
Maké
Level 9
3,551 3,490 180 543
Message 8 of 10
Flag Post
HP Recommended

Hi!, @HeyHeyJoe :

Please, can you write completely the program what not run Ok, in your G2 ?. 

Kind Regards !.
Have a nice day !.
@Maké (Technical Advisor Premium - HP Program Top Contributor).
Provost in HP Spanish Public Forum ... https://h30467.www3.hp.com/
HeyJoeJoe
Level 1
6 5 0 1
Message 9 of 10
Flag Post
HP Recommended

HP has provided such basic ideas it's not a language at all just a guessing game!

0 Kudos
HeyJoeJoe
Level 1
6 5 0 1
Message 10 of 10
Flag Post
HP Recommended

#cas

 

PP_PC():=

 

 

 

 

BEGIN

//polar_coordinates(rectangular_coordinates(polar_point()))

//rectangular_coordinates(polar_coordinates(polar_point(150,30)))

//polar_coordinates(rectangular_coordinates(polar_point(M1)))

 

 

 

 

//rectangular_coordinates(polar_coordinates(polar_point(M1(2))));

 

 

 

//rectangular_coordinates(polar_coordinates(polar_point(M1(1))));

 

polar_coordinates(rectangular_coordinates(polar_coordinates(polar_point(M1(1))))+rectangular_coordinates(polar_coordinates(polar_point(M1(2)))))

 

 

END;

#end

 

/////

 

It was a simple program that runs on the Home line of both CAS and not Cas sides of the Prime.

 

I was trying it as a pre-effect for counting off Matrix positions and doing work on them..eg like an array movement with a counter for positioning but haven't got that yet either still a myth in this version.

It was a program to solve the HP27s manual problem found on page 155.

0 Kudos
† The opinions expressed above are the personal opinions of the authors, not of HP. By using this site, you accept the Terms of Use and Rules of Participation