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GRB43
Level 3
35 27 1 4
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Storing little formulas or expressions for quick access?

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Prime
Linux

The more I learn about using the Prime, the better I like it.  Of the high end calculators I have it seems to be the quickest and easiest to navigate once you begin to learn where things are.  I would really like to know how and where to store little formulas or expressions for things like temperature conversion that I use regularly.  Just being able to recall a previous problem could be helpful.  Do people have suggestions as to what may be the best way to save types of problems that are used regularly?

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Maké
Level 9
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Hi!, @GRB3 :

You can see and apply Equation Library 1.0, from Eddie Shore ... https://www.hpcalc.org/details/7597

Kind Regards !.
Have a nice day !.
@Maké (Technical Advisor Premium - HP Program Top Contributor).
Provost in HP Spanish Public Forum ... https://h30467.www3.hp.com/
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GRB43
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Great, but how do I transfer the .zip file  to the Prime do I need to unzip it first?  I did unzip the download, but I'm unable to see the Prime when it is connected to my Linux based computer with the orginal HP USB cord.  I can read the program with the Linux text editor.  Most of them if not all are just little short math programs that could be entered by hand into the Prime if I knew how to do it.

 

I also noticed on the main page of the site you sent there are lots of tutorials, lessons, and helps  that appear to go beyond the manual.  Problem right now is how to get Linux to see the calculator.  Is there a Linux app that helps connect to the Prime?  Normally in recent years, Linux has no problem in generally seeing and connecting to USB devices.

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GRB43
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I guess the HP-Prime is one of the few modern devices on the planet that won't connect easily to Linux.  Who would have thought that.  I like the calculator but it is totally kneecapped without Linux connectivity.  Apparently  you can't even develop these little programs on the calculator itself.  I thought it was weird that I didn't seem to be able to address the file tree.

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cyrille
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Hello,

 

You can create programs and enter equations directly on the calculator... No need for a computer...

To download files to the calc, you will need the con kit, which only runs on PC and mac.. Sorry but we never released a linux version...

 

Regarding your little equations, you have a number of ways to solve your initial problem.

1) enter the equations using the define key. This will allow you to "create" named functions that you can then use anywhere. But this is limited to simple equations of the form f(x,y...,z)= math operation

2) enter the "equations" in a program. In a program, type something like:

export myFunction(my, params)

begin

  my program/calculations

  return my_result;

end;

 

You can not use myFunction from anywhere in the system. Note that you can put multiple functions in a single program and therefore group all your stuff. The advantage of programs is that they are easier to look at that the defines.

 

3) You can also enter your formulas in a function app copy. You can then refer them as MyEq.F1(X) (assuming that you named your copy MyEq)... Problem is that you have to remember what F1 is, but this allows for drawing and other ways to look at your functions...

 

4) you could enter them in the Solve app also, depending on what you want to do with them.

 

As you see, lots of ways depending on how many functions you have, how complex/simple they are, and what you want to do with them.

 

Cyrille

I am an HP Employee
GRB43
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Thanks for the advice.  I look into each of the suggestions.   I do find it very odd that the Prime is not Linux compatible.  It is totally unacceptible this day in age.  If HP hasn't made a program that runs natively on Linux they need to do so post haste.   I don't want to rag on Windows on this forum, but from my perspective it's an entirely loser OS.   It has became dangersous to even run it as a dual boot with Linux as Windows has the ability to be massively desctructive to the entire computer as it hijacks the BIOS.  If that weren't bad enough, the work flow is entirely pathetic.  To start, it's entirely confusing, has a terrible update system, and is entirely annoying  with incessant notifications and advertisements.  I stopped using it over ten years ago or more, and it was the happiest day of my life.   I would throw my HP Prime in the trash before installing any form of Windows.  I don't use it, and never will.  It has set the entire computer industry back by at least 20 years,  Usually posts like this get deleted bceause the pitiful Windiows Wimps can't accept the truth.

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GRB43
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Regarding storing functions:

1) enter the equations using the define key. This will allow you to "create" named functions that you can then use anywhere. But this is limited to simple equations of the form f(x,y...,z)= math operation

 

I pushed the "define" key and entered C2F in the Name box and "C=CONVERT(0_℃,℉) into the "Function;" box, but when I puse Alpha C nothing happens.  I do get some "Invalid Format" errors on the input.

 

This is also the reason I don't want to try to compile a program to run on my Linux system.  I'm simply an end user GUI limited person.

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GRB43
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"Regarding your little equations, . . .

1) enter the equations using the define key. This will allow you to "create" named functions that you can then use anywhere. But this is limited to simple equations of the form f(x,y...,z)= math operation"

 

I finally got it to work (sort of).  The Use Guide on page 509 states: You can run your function by entering it on the entry line in Home view, or be selecting it from the USER menu.

 

I don't know were the USER menu is.   I see you can get some previously used functions from <Shift> <Menu>.  Is that considered the User Menu?

 

Entering the name in the entry line in Home view seem combersome.  Where do you find the so called USER menu

 

Never mind,  I finally found the USER menu as a Tab in the Tool Box, and it is resonably handy, but I don't know what happens if and when the list gets long,   In any case, it's a good start.

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cyrille
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Hello,

 

in the define box, enter, for the function, convert((C)_°C, 1_°F), validate and make sure that the C box that will apear is checked. press OK and here you go, call your function by typing c2f(100)....

 

the user menu of toolbox will only apear once you do have user created content.

 

Cyrille

I am an HP Employee
GRB43
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My (your) Program Functions and User Functions  are in the Tool Box -> User Tab menu.  I prefer to use the menu system as I'm a GUI guy,  I can use the terminal just a bit in Linux, but I'm not comfortable with it by in large.  I find typing in Alpha characters in the Prime to be tedious.   The TI-Nspire has a small physical keyboard, but it's far from a joy to use that calculator because the menus are very convoluted.

Why is this post labeled as a "Spoiler"?   It's not the intent.
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