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HP Recommended
Microsoft Windows 10 (64-bit)
Hello everyone,
my company has installed on some HP8200 SFF hard disk SSD (goodram 120 gb CL 100) and RAM 8 GB for the transition to windows 10.
The problem is that with proprietary management software installed, I have noticed that disk access sometimes goes up to 100%, blocking usage.
I noticed that by setting the max eSATA speed to 3.0 GBps item in the bios under the heading Storage Option, the software no longer crashes.
Could it be that by setting that parameter, it sets all the speed of the SATA bus to the maximum speed, preventing the disk from crashing?
Thanks for the replies
1 REPLY 1
HP Recommended

@netrunner84 --  Hello everyone, my company has installed on some HP8200 SFF hard disk SSD (goodram 120 gb CL 100) and RAM 8 GB for the transition to windows 10.

 

Microsoft will terminate all support for Windows 10 in October 2025. After that time, your company may need to purchase new computers that are compatible with Windows 11.

 

The problem is that with proprietary management software installed, I have noticed that disk access sometimes goes up to 100%, blocking usage.

 

That is not a problem. 

It just means that one app, or maybe a few apps, are "pushing" the SSD to operate at 100%. 

For example, a virus-scan does a large amount of reading from the SSD.

Another example is a "disk defragmenter" (which should NOT be used on a SSD) does a lot of input/output, as it works.

Another example is "Windows Update". Again, lots of input/output as it updates Windows.

 

I noticed that by setting the max eSATA speed to 3.0 Gbps item in the BIOS under the heading Storage Option, the software no longer crashes. Could it be that by setting that parameter, it sets all the speed of the SATA bus to the maximum speed, preventing the disk from crashing?

 

For a "modern" motherboard, the maximum speed of the SATA bus is 6 Gpbs, not 3 Gbps.

 

Do you actually have any device connected to the EXTERNAL "eSATA" port on your computer?

If not, then changing that setting will have NO effect.

Note: for some motherboards with 4 SATA sockets on the motherboard, the 4th socket can either be used for an internal SATA device or an external "eSATA" device, but not both devices at the same time.

 

What I think is that whatever app that was extensively using your SSD has finished, and now your SSD is "mostly idle".

 

† The opinions expressed above are the personal opinions of the authors, not of HP. By using this site, you accept the <a href="https://www8.hp.com/us/en/terms-of-use.html" class="udrlinesmall">Terms of Use</a> and <a href="/t5/custom/page/page-id/hp.rulespage" class="udrlinesmall"> Rules of Participation</a>.