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Message 1 of 65
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hp phone call scam

HP Recommended
HP Pavillion 23
Microsoft Windows 10 (32-bit)

Just received a phone call from a guy posing as HP Tech Support.  Since I have had some issues with my computer in the past, I thought this was HP just doing a courtesy call.  This guy claimed I had malware and virusses that had to be removed immediately.  He asked me to run something and showed me that there was a ''virus'' that couldn't be removed by deleting it.  Told me that he had to get on to my computer to get rid of it.  Told me to go to a website called showmypc.com and asked me for the password.  Thankfully my husband was here and googled it quickly and told me to be leary.  Consequently I asked to speak with his manager - she tried to explain why they needed to have access and that the were authentic--- she new a little bit about my computer -- that I had called for a service call - but didn't know which month and wasn't able to accurately tell me when I purchased the computer either. 

At that point I told her that she didn't have the correct information and that I would contact HP tech support and I was confident that they would help me if I really did have a virus and hung up. 

 

 

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Message 2 of 65
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@GYNE

 

I have brought your issue to the attention of an appropriate team within HP. They will likely request information from you in order to look up your case details or product serial number. Please look for a private message from an identified HP contact. Additionally, keep in mind not to publicly post personal information (serial numbers and case details).

If you are unfamiliar with how the Forum's private message capability works, you can learn about that here.

Thank you for visiting the HP Support Forum.

I work on behalf of HP
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Message 3 of 65
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HP Recommended

I have also been receiving calls from someone claiming to be HP support. Thay claim to be getting a "Strange Signal" from my pc. Can even hear other people talking in the background, as if it's a real Support Call Center. The incoming number is 1-800-425-4026.

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Message 4 of 65
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HP Recommended

This definitely is on the line between "scam" (because there's nothing wrong with your computer) and "unethical marketing" (cold-calling you to scare you into paying them over $100 for a "one-time" repair of our computer, and then paying them over $400 for "lifetime" support from them).

 

Hang up on them.

 

If you have given your credit-card information to them, contact your bank that issued the credit-card to you.

Look on the back of your credit-card for their telephone-number.

Explain that you have been defrauded.

They will cancel your credit-card, and get you a new one.

They will check your accounts for any suspicious activity.

They will advise you if it's possible to contact those people, and demand a refund.

They may cancel any of those fraudulent charges.

 

 

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Message 5 of 65
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A few days ago a 'representative' from HP called regarding 'viruses' on my computer. I was immediately skeptical because HP does not just call from out of no where, you typically have to call them first with an issue. The guy was also quite aggressive when I resisted his efforts to 'help' me by running programs (showmypc.com just like you) on my computer. He had information that I would not expect- my computer's serial number for instance and my full name. When I asked him to show me the specific issue he asked me to log on to my event viewer to see all of the 'errors'. This would all be quite convincing to someone with a little less knowledge about computers (I am no expert but this smelled bad). 

 

He offered me a case number and a 1800 number to call him back. I said I would and then immediately called HP who confirmed it is a scam and that they would never call me without me calling them first. HP said that this is happening to lots of customers and they don't know how the scammers are getting our info (in this case the seller of my HP could have been hacked for the data). My call was from 630-318-4762. The fake tech suggested I call him back at: 888-303-2813. This is scary HP, please go after these people! 

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Message 6 of 65
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> He had my full name.

 

Google knows all.  Google-search your own "land-line" telephone-number, and you probably will find your full name.

 

Google-search the telephone-number that they gave you to call them back, and read the comments that other people have made about that telephone-number.

 

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Message 7 of 65
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800-474-6836 is another one calling claiming to be HP Support. "Helping" you to clean viruses from your PC. Maddening! I did not give them any info nor go to their site to download software. Criminals!
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I have a Pavilion 23 and work from my home office.  I took a call yesterday when my caller ID read “Hewlett Packard” and the phone number “650-857-1501.”  I spoke to two different scammers on the call who said my network had been compromised and they needed to remote in to fix it.  I stupidly gave them access to do so and was thrown for a loop because 1) my caller ID said it was HP, 2) they knew my name, and 3) my computer had been acting strange these past few days (slow, freezing up, not completing software updates, etc.) and I already believed something was wrong with it.  They ran some bogus programs on my screen to show me that I had been hacked, all the while I thought something was wrong and asked questions to confirm their authenticity.  The scammer said I needed a new product ID and should go to CVS and purchase a $300 iTunes gift card for this.  At that point I hung up, shut my desktop down, and called the real HP for tech support.  I was obviously concerned about whatever the hackers had done to my computer, if anything, and was under the pressure of a big work deadline.  I said yes to the $99.95 fee for HP tech support and was desperate to get my computer back up and running again and me back to work.  I was assured by the first HP rep that HP tech support would be able to help.

The first HP tech I spoke with sounded smug and agitated by my questions.  He said the remote access tool they use wasn’t working and that he’d need to call me back in ½ hour to an hour.  I waited over an hour and a half and then called back myself.  The second HP tech seemed a bit more willing to help and customer service focused, but was also not able to remote in.  It’s concerning how easily the hackers were able to access my computer, but not HP themselves?   I’m waiting for HP to call me back this morning to try again.  So as it stands, I’ve shelled out nearly $100 for HP tech support, spoken to two techs, spent most of my evening and night away from my family trying to troubleshoot, and my computer has disappointingly not yet been looked at by HP (and for anyone reading this who actually cares, yup, my work deadline came and went yesterday while my hands were tied in this mess). 

I’m totally kicking myself for being stupid enough to 1) fall into the scam trap and 2) believe HP would help when they said they would.  I don’t typically post in these types of venues, but felt compelled to do so in case my mistakes save anyone else from a similar headache.  Lesson learned.

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I too had the same thing done to mine.  They claimed to be at Microsoft Service Center, gave me the same line and I ofcourse believed them because I was having a problem with my computer and they did have the correct License ID #.  Once they got into my computer, they wouldn't give it back to me unless I went immediately and purchase $250 in I Tune cards and was told that would entitle me to lifetime support.  At that point, I went along with the scam to get my computer back, which they eventually did, but now I have no idea what they might have done to it or have access in the future.  I did call my credit card company and report the fraud and cancel the card.  I can't believe I fell for it either, because I have hung up on these calls before, but it was just the timing of it all that I was having problems with the computer and they told me only I and Microsoft had access to my License ID.     

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This just happened to me on 3/20/2017. Same phone number. Same spiel. Apparently, according to Norton Symantec, spyware is being downloaded from some site people have visited and that is how they are able to get computer info, address, name and phone number. They had my serial number, product number, email address, name, etc. I am not on Google when you run a search to see if you can obtain any of this information.

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