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cafcaf
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DESKTOP COMPUTERS

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HP Slimline S 3700y Desktop

I frequently have to click on an icon 4 to 5 times before I get a response.  I also have computer games - not online games, but those from disc's - and some won't recoginize the cursor movements, or others will drop multiple balls with each click instead of just one.  I've taken my desktop to be repaired a few times and have only been told that I have a virus.  Reportedly the virus was taken care of, but the problems continue to persist.  I'm running Windows Vista, but I don't know if it's 64-bit.  I'd also like to upgrade to Windows 7.

 

Please help.  Thank you

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mdklassen
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> I frequently have to click on an icon 4 to 5 times before I get a response. 

 

Are you sure that the mouse is working correctly?

Try connecting the mouse to a different computer, to see if the problem "moves" with the mouse.

Try a different mouse.

 

> I've taken my desktop to be repaired a few times and have only been told that I have a virus. 

> Reportedly the virus was taken care of, but the problems continue to persist. 

 

I would avoid that repair-shop -- they don't know what they are doing.'

 

Read: https://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc700813.aspx


Help: I Got Hacked. Now What Do I Do?

Jesper M. Johansson, Ph.D., CISSP, MCSE, MCP+I, [former] Security Program Manager, Microsoft Corporation

 

which flatly statest that the *ONLY* way to "repair" a virus-infected computer is to "flatten-and-rebuild".

 

> I'm running Windows Vista ...

 

Microsoft ended "support" for Windows Vista last month (April 11, 2017). 

 

> but I don't know if it's 64-bit. 

 

1. Click the Windows "start" button.

2. Right-mouse-button click on 'My Computer'.

3. Click 'Properties'.

4. Under Vista, you may need to click "more details".

 

It should tell you the 32/64 nature.

 

> I'd also like to upgrade to Windows 7.

 

Your computer was purchased between April 2007 and early 2010.

So, many of its parts, especially the disk-drive, are quite old, and will soon "fail".

 

Do *NOT* try to "upgrade" your computer -- it's time for you to buy a brand-new Windows 10 system.

 

If you're on a budget, see www.bestbuy.com  and search for "refurbished desktop computer".

You'll get a list of good computers for under $200 US -- barely more than the cost of Windows 10 Home software.

(If you can find it, a copy of Windows 7 would cost you over $100 US.)

 

 

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cafcaf
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I've changed the mouse to a  new one, and used the original one on other computers.  The old one works fine on others, but the new one stops moving (working) altogether - it just freezes up.  Would a new hard drive help?  I'm just grasping at straws here.  Thank you.

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cafcaf
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I just checked and I have a 32 pin whatever.  Here's another dumb question.  Does the hard drive store the operating system?    Thank you

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mdklassen
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> Does the hard drive store the operating system?   

 

Yes, it does, and it stores your personal files.

 

Turn your HP computer off.

Turn your computer on, and look for a message like "press <blah> to enter HP Hardware Diagnostics".

Immediately, press that <blah> key.

Run the tests for your RAM and your disk-drive, and tell us if it "passes" or "fails".

 

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cafcaf
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I did as you suggested.  The hard drive test failed.  The error code: BIOHD - 8.  Would you suggest I buy another hard drive as opposed to a new computer?

 

Thank you.

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mdklassen
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> Would you suggest I buy another hard drive as opposed to a new computer?

 

Yes.  A new disk-drive is about $100 US.  A new computer costs much more.

 

If the manufacturer's warranty is still valid, then they will replace the hard-drive, at no cost to you.

The process:

 

1. backup your personal files & bookmarks & E-mail messages

2. they provide you an RMA (Return of Materials Authorization) number, to enable you & them to "track" it

3. you ship your computer to them, citing the RMA number

4. they replace the disk-drive

5. they provide the "System Recovery Set" to enable you to install the original version of Windows onto the "empty" disk-drive

6. they ship the computer back to you

7. you install Windows

8. you install an anti-virus product, and other applications (MS Office? Adobe?)

9. you run Windows Update

10. you restore your files from your backup.

 

OR ...........................................

 

1. You buy a new disk-drive from SEAGATE, and download "disk-cloning" software from SEAGATE's web-site.

Or, you buy a new disk-drive from WESTERN DIGITAL, and download "disk-cloning" software from their web-site.

 

2. Install the "disk-cloning" software.

3. Connect the new disk-drive.

4. Run the "disk-cloning" software.  It should copy, byte-for-byte, from "source" to "target".

If it hits any "I/O errors" while reading your old disk-drive, try the "skip this sector" option.

5. Disconnect the old disk-drive.

6. Connect the new disk-drive.

7. Boot your computer.   Your "programs" and your "files" will be intact.

 

OR ...........................................

 

1. Buy a new disk-drive.

2. Disconnect the old disk-drive.

3. Connect the new disk-drive.

4. Install Windows & run Windows Update & install anti-virus software.

5. Connect the old disk-drive as a "slave" disk-drive.

6. Copy all your personal files from "old" to "new" (the anti-virus software will scan during the copy).

7. Reinstall your applications.

 

Or, take your computer to a qualified technician to have her/him do either of the above for you.

You should be charged $50 to $70 per hour for 1 or 2 hours. 

 

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cafcaf
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What is a "slave" disc drive and how do you install it?   What is disc cloning software, and where do I get it?  Can I install a new disc drive without removing the old one first, and if so how?  Also, I never received a Windows disc when I bought my computer.  How to I get it back?  Can I upgrade and install Windows 7 instead of Vista?

 

Thank you.

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mdklassen
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> What is a "slave" disc drive and how do you install it?  

 

The disk-drive that Windows boots from is the "primary" disk-drive.

All other disk-drives connected to the same computer are "slave" disk-drives.

 

Each disk-drive has two connectors -- one for "power" and one for "data".

For a desktop computer, the power-supply inside it needs to have a currently-unused "power" connector that you need to connect to the "slave" disk-drive.

You will also need a "data" cable to connect from a connector on the motherboard to the "slave" disk-drive.

 

You will also need a few screws, to hold the casing of the disk-drive into a "drive-bay".

 

> What is disc cloning software, and where do I get it? 

 

Cloning is cloning, whether it is a sheep embryo, or a science-fiction movie, that creates an exact copy of the original.

Disk-cloning software reads from a "source" disk-drive, and, byte-by-byte, copies to a "target" disk-drive, to create an exact copy of the original.

 

> Can I install a new disc drive without removing the old one first, and if so how? 

 

Yes, a desktop computer usually has a spare "drive-bay", to physically hold the disk-drive,

and it has spare "power" connector, and a spare "data" socket on the motherboard.

Just add a $5 "data" cable to connect between the motherboard and the disk-drive.

 

> I never received a Windows disc when I bought my computer.  How to I get it back? 

 

Many computer manufacturers seek to reduce their production-costs, by not creating the physical media, and by not including the media in the "packaging list" of items that came with your computer.

 

Instead, the manufacturers chose to install a program on the computer that the owner needs to run to create a "Windows disk", by writing to a few user-supplied DVD-recordable disks.

 

Does your copy of Windows include such a "utility" program?

Even if your disk-drive is in "imminent failure" status, it still may function well-enough to run that program.

 

> Can I upgrade and install Windows 7 instead of Vista?

 

For free?  No, you cannot.

Is most hardware that was running Windows Vista capable of running Windows 7?  Yes, it may work.

 

 

Given your questions, it's time to take your computer to a qualified technician, who has the technical skills to setup and try a "disk-cloning".  If too many files (or fragments of files) fail to copy, then the "Plan B" is to install Windows on a new disk-drive, and copy all your personal files from the "slave" disk-drive to the new disk-drive.

 

The technician will charge $50 to $70 per hour, for 1 or 2 hours, and a new disk-drive will be around $100.

 

I think that it is a *BAD* idea to spend up to $240 to "refurbish" your "ancient" computer.

 

>  I'm running Windows Vista.

 

Microsoft officially ended all support for Vista on April 11, 2017.

So, no new "security-fixes" will be issued.

Other software on your computer will also be "orphaned" -- no more updates for it.

It's time for you to buy a new computer.

Remove the disk-drive from your current computer, and attach it as a "slave" disk-drive, and copy all your personal files from "old" to "new" disk-drives.

 

Note that any computer purchased after April 2010 came pre-installed with Windows 7.

This implies that your current computer, and its disk-drive, is at least 7 years old.

If your automobile's tires were 7 years old, they would be worn-out, and you would replace them.

Amortize your computer's purchase cost over 7 years -- you have gotten good value for your dollars.

Buy a new computer, and amortize its cost over the next 5 to 7 years, to justify the expenditure.

 

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