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November12
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Thunderstorm

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pavilion 23 all in one
Microsoft Windows 7 (64-bit)

Hi all, yesterday we had a thunderstorm in Euless Tx., my wifi device is not working after the thunder hit, my desktop all in one pavilion23 is got a shock too, it was off and the plug turned off too, but it was plugged to the wifi by a cable.

Now when I turn it on, only the CPU fan is working too fast, I tried 30 second power drain, removed the CMOS battery, unplugged the CPU fan, swapped RAMs, still have the same problem.

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westom
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When power is first applied, the fan spins at 100% speed.  It is only slowed when the
CPU starts executing and turn down that fan speed.

 

If it was powered off, other AC wires still could have connected a surge into the machnie.  But remember, this is electricity.  A surge incoming on AC mains must have another path outgoing.  So damage also may exist on that outgoing path.

 

Meanwhile, the power brick has surge protection typically superior to anythnig you might plug into.  In fact, a power strip protector may even compromise (bypass) protection already inside all computers.

 

To say more requires facts not provided.  It may have been damaged by a surge (does not matter if powered on or off).  It may have failed due to something that creates more failures - manufacturing defects.  Nobody can say without first identifying a failed motherboard or power brick internal part.

 

Unfortunately you tried to fix it BEFORE identifying the failure.  All those changes may have further complicated the solution.   First collect facts to identify the failure.  In your case, apparently the power controller (or smoethnig else) is not permitting the CPU to execute. That is but one possible.  To say more requires hard facts that have not yet been provided (other than the fan spins a 100% speed).

 

 

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old_geekster
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If there was an electrical spike it is very possible that the power adapter has been damaged.  I suggest having it tested by a qualified technician.

 

For future reference, when requesting help you should always include the make/model (i.e. p6-xxxx) of the computer and/or monitor. This information is necessary for us to review the specifications of them.

 

Please click the "Thumbs up + button" if I have helped you and click "Accept as Solution" if your problem is solved.

 

 






I am not an HP Employee!!

Intelligence is God given. Wisdom is the sum of our mistakes!!
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November12
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The pc was off, and the plug was turned off by a switch, the only connected cable was the lan cable from router, could that damage the board.
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old_geekster
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Yes, if the computer was plugged into an outlet it could be damaged by a spike.  You should have it connected through a very good surge protector.  This will keep the spike from getting to the computer.






I am not an HP Employee!!

Intelligence is God given. Wisdom is the sum of our mistakes!!
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westom
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When power is first applied, the fan spins at 100% speed.  It is only slowed when the
CPU starts executing and turn down that fan speed.

 

If it was powered off, other AC wires still could have connected a surge into the machnie.  But remember, this is electricity.  A surge incoming on AC mains must have another path outgoing.  So damage also may exist on that outgoing path.

 

Meanwhile, the power brick has surge protection typically superior to anythnig you might plug into.  In fact, a power strip protector may even compromise (bypass) protection already inside all computers.

 

To say more requires facts not provided.  It may have been damaged by a surge (does not matter if powered on or off).  It may have failed due to something that creates more failures - manufacturing defects.  Nobody can say without first identifying a failed motherboard or power brick internal part.

 

Unfortunately you tried to fix it BEFORE identifying the failure.  All those changes may have further complicated the solution.   First collect facts to identify the failure.  In your case, apparently the power controller (or smoethnig else) is not permitting the CPU to execute. That is but one possible.  To say more requires hard facts that have not yet been provided (other than the fan spins a 100% speed).

 

 

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