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HP Recommended
OMEN 30L Desktop PC GT13-1000a (207P6AV)

Hi all,

 

Just got my omen 30l ryzen 9 3080 in this week. While the machine is a step up in terms of oem support for other hardware, the stock machine obviously doesnt have proper thermal management in this hardware setup. The flow true the radiator is limited by a lack of power, as power is required in order to achieve any proper inflow in this case.

With the cooling in the stock setup it was kissing the thermal throttles, with frequent erratic spinups of the top fan.

 

I replaced the radiator top fan with a Noctua NF-F12 industrialPPC-3000 PWM, and the rear fan with a basic noc, and did a clean and repast. Results were ok, but not what expected, and airflow passing the radiator was not that impressive. Going full Mcgyver i tested several setups, including usage of the 'stock fans i replaced.

In the end i ended with this 'uncommon' setup, that works. Yes its ugly but you will love it never the less.  As my cpu doesnt hit 70 deg under full sustained load, and a gpu that stays below 60 deg..

 

All of this introduction/context for my question: How do i get the top cover of? Or does anyone have a trick to pass a wire to trough the top of the case, so i can hook the fans up more direct? Right now i have a wire crossing the case and making a loop, to connect to my fan controller.

Anyone with suggestions?

 

Thxn a bunch, gr JW, Holland

image0.jpegimage1.jpeg

 

 

 

1 ACCEPTED SOLUTION

Accepted Solutions
HP Recommended

@jcnwholland,

 

Yes, I have an operational proposition for you to create perfectly circular holes to hugely increase air flow compared with trying to push air through the restricting meshed surface area of your 30L's top cover AND as a bonus feed the fan's wiring neatly through -say for a standard 90x90x25mm cooling fan (other Ø sizes also readily available), and it is proudly manufactured in the US of A [I tell myself] and boldly called a "Milwaukee 3½ inch (89mm) Bi-Metal Hole Dozer Saw".

 

Yessiree-Bob: guaranteed to cut like butter into any computer case.  Tried & recommended.

 

For your convenience, here's the link: Milwaukee 3-1/2 in. Hole Dozer Hole Saw 49-56-9641 - The Home Depot

 

Of course, if you can't remove/separate your rig's top cover from the computer components &/or your motherboard, you would have to evacuate them first before you go Yeeha cowboy on your chassis.

 

For this particular surgery, the thinking behind it was to substantially increase the internal positive pressure and increase the airflow -especially through my HP EliteDesk 800 G3 SFF's heatsink.

 

Thus, installed a high performance 6 watt 90x90x25mm cooling fan on top of the chassis cover centered directly above the HP EliteDesk 800 G3 SFF's CPU heatsink/fan assembly and also removed the heatsink shroud. (I didn't think that the 800 G3 SFF shroud was particularly effective anyway, so good riddance.) In order to provide PWM-controlled power to the new fan, I installed a "4-Pin PWM PC Fan Hub Power Supply Cable 1 to 5 Way Splitter PC Motherboard Case Fan Power Extension Cable Cord" (you can see the splitter in the middle picture stuck to the internal PSU), plugged it into the 4-pin CPU fan power motherboard connector, and connected both the CPU heatsink and the external cooling fan's 4-pin connectors to it so that they work in tandem.

 

This CPU cooling modification is working very well: upon stressing my i7-7700K, instead of peaking around a blistering 99° C, the highest CPU temperature I observed was 85° C.

 

[DISCLAIMER:] Lest I forget and upon further reflection, HP most strongly disapproves of these sorts of modifications AND it would invalidate your product's warranty. Since you got a brand-new Gaming rig, you don't want to cut holes just yet in your chassis.  Thought I should mention it.

 

NonSequitur777_0-1645831344291.png

 

NonSequitur777_1-1645831765768.png

 

NonSequitur777_2-1645831817039.png

 


View solution in original post

4 REPLIES 4
HP Recommended

@jcnwholland,

 

Yes, I have an operational proposition for you to create perfectly circular holes to hugely increase air flow compared with trying to push air through the restricting meshed surface area of your 30L's top cover AND as a bonus feed the fan's wiring neatly through -say for a standard 90x90x25mm cooling fan (other Ø sizes also readily available), and it is proudly manufactured in the US of A [I tell myself] and boldly called a "Milwaukee 3½ inch (89mm) Bi-Metal Hole Dozer Saw".

 

Yessiree-Bob: guaranteed to cut like butter into any computer case.  Tried & recommended.

 

For your convenience, here's the link: Milwaukee 3-1/2 in. Hole Dozer Hole Saw 49-56-9641 - The Home Depot

 

Of course, if you can't remove/separate your rig's top cover from the computer components &/or your motherboard, you would have to evacuate them first before you go Yeeha cowboy on your chassis.

 

For this particular surgery, the thinking behind it was to substantially increase the internal positive pressure and increase the airflow -especially through my HP EliteDesk 800 G3 SFF's heatsink.

 

Thus, installed a high performance 6 watt 90x90x25mm cooling fan on top of the chassis cover centered directly above the HP EliteDesk 800 G3 SFF's CPU heatsink/fan assembly and also removed the heatsink shroud. (I didn't think that the 800 G3 SFF shroud was particularly effective anyway, so good riddance.) In order to provide PWM-controlled power to the new fan, I installed a "4-Pin PWM PC Fan Hub Power Supply Cable 1 to 5 Way Splitter PC Motherboard Case Fan Power Extension Cable Cord" (you can see the splitter in the middle picture stuck to the internal PSU), plugged it into the 4-pin CPU fan power motherboard connector, and connected both the CPU heatsink and the external cooling fan's 4-pin connectors to it so that they work in tandem.

 

This CPU cooling modification is working very well: upon stressing my i7-7700K, instead of peaking around a blistering 99° C, the highest CPU temperature I observed was 85° C.

 

[DISCLAIMER:] Lest I forget and upon further reflection, HP most strongly disapproves of these sorts of modifications AND it would invalidate your product's warranty. Since you got a brand-new Gaming rig, you don't want to cut holes just yet in your chassis.  Thought I should mention it.

 

NonSequitur777_0-1645831344291.png

 

NonSequitur777_1-1645831765768.png

 

NonSequitur777_2-1645831817039.png

 


HP Recommended

thxn a bunch for the detailed reply. It looks like a good solution, but time consuming i think?

Think i will get an other case and mainboard eventually.. done for maybe 300euro or some, and future ready.

HP Recommended

@jcnwholland,

 

You are quite welcome.  Not very time consuming though, took me about 20 minutes, including using fine sandpaper to remove rough edges/burrs and the drilling of the 4 bolt holes.

 

The consensus feedback online is that the 45L case is much better equipped/designed to cool the internal computer components.

 

Kind Regards,

 

NonSequitur777


HP Recommended

Yes, 20 minutes for you, probably means 60 for me. With an end result consisting of 3 cuts in my hand and a hole in my case that is to small or big for a fan hehe.

 

I found out btw how to get the top of, or at least the instructions on how to. Will give it a go later maybe. But this will allow me to stick the second fan on the other side of the radiator.

 

The case is indeed to small, maybe if they fitted a bigger dual fan radiator. Smaller case does not mean smaller cooler hp.. its the opposite 

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