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volvy
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local log in on sender when receiver connected?

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z440
Microsoft Windows 10 (64-bit)

How does one locally kill a remote session on a sender machine while a receiver connection is in place?    In this case it is the same user, who forgot to disconnect a remote session, and physically arrives back at the sender machine, only to find that every time they try to log in locally (on the sender), the sender will reactivate the screed lock as soon as the user completes the local login.  However a standard windows RDP session can be established from a 3rd machine and login with the users expected level of access.

Thanks

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KellyRGS
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Whenever a session is disconnected from Remote Boost, the desktop is locked and a log in is required.  However, if the sender is shared, and this user remains logged in, others will have an issue connecting because the user is logged in.  Try logging with administrative rights and go to Task Manager.  Under Users you should be able to log that person out.  Are you saying that with RDP, if this user is logged in, but disconnected the session, other users can log in?

I am an HP employee.
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volvy
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The session was most likely connected but not in active use, since it was left that way by the user.  There would have had to have been a network interruption for there to be a disconnection.  The user is a standard user only and does not have Admin privileges.  IT is not necessarily available to help either on site or remotely.

 

No one other than the one user attempted to log in either locally or remotely.

 

However, even though the user could not get the screen lock to release by logging in locally, they could use a standard Windows  RDP session from a 3rd computer to log into the sender computer.  This apparently bypass the screen lock and the user could access the desktop without any interference or restriction.  Doing this did not release the ZCentral local screen lock, retrying a local login showed the ZCentral screen lock to still be in place.

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