patscarr Honor Student
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10/100BASE-T Ethernet LAN speed

HP Pavilion 17-e119wm Notebook
Microsoft Windows 10 (64-bit)

My HP Pavilion 17-e119wm Notebook PC with built in Realtek PCle FE Family Controller 10/100BASE-T Ethernet LAN and upgraded to Windows 10 and says it has most up to date driver version 8.20.815.2013,  is only getting 10mbps download speed plugged in on ethernet.   I am paying for 60mbps through my ISP.  My WiFi gets close to 60mbps.  Shouldnt this laptop plugged in to hard wired ethernet cable get close to 60mbps?  When I click on ethernet status in Windows Network Connections, under speed it shows a bottleneck of 10mbps.  How can I increase that number to 100mbps or increase my ethernet speed to 60mbps?

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HP Recommended

10/100BASE-T Ethernet LAN speed


patscarr wrote:

My HP Pavilion 17-e119wm Notebook PC with built in Realtek PCle FE Family Controller 10/100BASE-T Ethernet LAN and upgraded to Windows 10 and says it has most up to date driver version 8.20.815.2013,  is only getting 10mbps download speed plugged in on ethernet.   I am paying for 60mbps through my ISP.  My WiFi gets close to 60mbps.  Shouldnt this laptop plugged in to hard wired ethernet cable get close to 60mbps?  When I click on ethernet status in Windows Network Connections, under speed it shows a bottleneck of 10mbps.  How can I increase that number to 100mbps or increase my ethernet speed to 60mbps?


Hi,

 

Why You Probably Aren’t Getting the Internet Speeds You’re Paying For (and How to Tell)

Have you ever noticed that your Internet service provider advertises their speeds as “up to” a maximum speed? You may think you’re paying for a 15 Mbps connection, but you’re actually getting an “up to 15 Mbps” connection that may be slower.

We’ll look at why actual speeds differ from advertised speeds and how you can identify whether you’re actually getting the Internet connection speeds you’re paying for.

 

Actual vs. Advertised Speeds: Hard Data

Data showing that most people are getting slower broadband speeds than they’re advertised is easy to find. To get this data, all someone has to do is run a speed test on their connection and compare the actual results to the advertised speeds. In most cases, the speeds are slower.

If you’re curious about Internet speeds in the US, you can view the official US government National Broadband Map site and compare “SpeedTest vs. Advertised” to view the difference between actual speed tests and advertised speeds on a map. All the purple and pink dots are slower than advertised, while the light green dots are areas which match their advertised speeds.

The map appear to be primarily dark purple and pink — it’s clear that most people are getting slower speeds than they were advertised. Faster speeds than advertised, which are dark green, are even harder to find.

 

What Causes Slow Downs

So why exactly do so few people get the advertised speeds? Well, it’s obviously true that Internet service providers have an incentive to be as optimistic as possible with their numbers, but it’s not just misleading marketing. There are other factors involved:

  • End-User Hardware Issues: If you have an old router that just can’t keep up with modern speeds or a poorly configured Wi-Fi connection that’s being slowed down by interference, you won’t actually experience the connection speeds you’re paying for — and that’s not the Internet service provider’s fault.
  • Distance From ISP: The further you are away from your Internet service provider’s hardware, the weaker your signal can become. If you’re in a city, you’re likely to have a faster connection than you would in the middle of the countryside.
  • Congestion: You’re sharing an Internet connection line with many other customers from your Internet service provider, so congestion can result as all these people compete for the Internet connection. This is particularly true if all your neighbors are using BitTorrent 24/7 or using other demanding applications.
  • Time of Day: Because more people are probably using the shared connection line during peak hours — around 6pm to midnight for residential connections — you may experience slower speeds at these times.
  • Throttling; Your Internet service provider may slow down (or “throttle”) certain types of traffic, such as peer-to-peer traffic. Even if they advertise “unlimited” usage, they may slow down your connection for the rest of the month after you hit a certain amount of data downloaded.
  • Server-Side Issues: Your download speeds don’t just depend on your Internet service provider’s advertised speeds. They also depend on the speeds of the servers you’re downloading from and the routers in between. For example, if you’re in the US and experience slowness when downloading something from a website in Europe, it may not be your Internet service provider’s fault at all — it may be because the website in Europe has a slow connection or the data is being slowed down at one of the routers in between you and the European servers.

Many factors can impact Internet connection speed, and it’s hard to know which is the precise problem. Nevertheless, in real-life usage, you’ll generally experience slower speeds than your Internet service provider advertises — if only because it’s so dependent on other people’s Internet connections.

 

Measuring Your Internet Connection Speed

You can attempt to measure your Internet connection speed by using the SpeedTest website. Select a nearby server and SpeedTest will establish a connection to it, trying to download the file as fast as it can. It also attempts to upload data, testing your upload speed. This gives you a good idea of the speed your Internet service provider is giving you, as the SpeedTest servers are chosen because they can deliver very fast speeds. Using a nearby server allows you to test a more direct connection, with minimal interference from third-party routers — for example, if you choose a SpeedTest server on the other side of the world, you’ll almost certainly experience slower speeds. Check your connection speeds at different times, including at peak hours and off. They may fluctuate over time.

 

Reference: https://www.howtogeek.com/165321/why-you-probably-arent-getting-the-internet-speeds-youre-paying-for...

 

Regards

Norman

 

"Education costs money; so does Ignorance"

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patscarr Honor Student
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10/100BASE-T Ethernet LAN speed

Sorry, but that answer was most unhelpful and too generic.  My question was very clear, precise, and specific.  I'm sure there is an HP guru tech who can tell me if my ethernet card can support 100mbps or not and how to unbottleneck it from the 10mbps it is stuck at.  I just had an ISP service tech here and everything is running as it should be.  I'm sure the problem is with the card or the software / driver.

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patscarr Honor Student
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10/100BASE-T Ethernet LAN speed

I even went into Device Managaer, Network Adapters, Realtek PCle FE Family Controller, Properties, Advanced, Speed and Duplex, and changed it from Auto Negotiation to 100 mbps Full Duplex.  That didn't help either.  I think this card is built into this motherboard and that I am out of luck until I get a new laptop. 

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10/100BASE-T Ethernet LAN speed

short answer

100base is not 1000base.

end story.

 

long:

10/100 is not giglan router, sorry,

nor is you LT support giga lan speeds.

why expect it to be that.?

100 Mbit/s, is max.

gig lan is

1,000,000,000 bits per second or 1000M bits  per second.

here is what you dont have,  end to end.

do not confuse mega bit with mega BYTES.  they are not the same.

 

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gigabit_Ethernet

 

my 1 LT, HP 8540w has a gigalan chip in it, (costs more .x10 faster)

Intel 82577LM and 82577LC Gigabit Ethernet Driver (International

 

yours does not have this. nor do I see it offered,  but do ask, im no expert on what any hp can use , missing from the parts lists.

 

my home is has 3 gigalan switches wired to the main router (1000) we have giga lan everwhere in home for cameras etc.

and 2 wifi nodes, used for only cell phones,

 

once you get your LT running at 1000,then the rounter, see the internet speeds surge fast. like the link below shows.speed.JPG

 

have you run speed tests on  your side yet, skip internet for now.

 

there are tools to do that.

called INTrAnet , see that "A" tests (or local net in home)

 

have 2 PCs running and with one sharing say a C: temp folder?>

and runs speed tests from that resource (free software to do that, exists)

 

if it runs near full speed, you learned its only the internet is slow.

and sure can be

what is your speed here.

 

the speed advertised by your ISP is to internet back bone not ever to a place. heck I have servers in the net that are slugs.

what you experience end to end is anything and everthing. (on the www , world wide wait)

ever see the cost of 1 one google data center?  ouch.

even that and bottle necks happen no matter how many $billiions you spend.

 

here

mine does 200Mbps up and 10x less down, its 16channel, cable, drive here. max warp possilbe here..

 

http://beta.speedtest.net/

 

 

what does yours do there??

 

 

and....

MBps is an abbreviation for Megabytes per second, whereas Mbps is an abbreviation for megabits per second. Eight megabits equal one Megabyte.

 

giglan is rated in bits , not bytes.

so 1000 div by 8 would be  125 MBps

when you see the high numbers you know its bits. see?

 

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10/100BASE-T Ethernet LAN speed

wifi max is 54Mbps. but.

 fairly common for 802.11g connections to run at 36 Mbps, 24 Mbps, or even lower.!!! (wifi can be bad if you dont change to an unused channel., in the hood)

 

your ethernet card 100Mbps (less counting overhead) you do know right, the difference from raw speed

against trough put speeds ,right>  it is overhead

read how the 7 layers of networking add to overhead and bingo, why.

 

and then comes collisions on the net, or wifi.

 

at no time did you tell the tools you used to measure speeds?

vast tools exist.

 

but your LT does not have a GIGA LAN card and will NEVER compilment your ISP service rates Ever

it takes that card and a router rated at 1000base speed.s

 

btw1  100bass is 12.5 meg bytes for second, are you confused on that?  bits bytes thing?

id  do no know, i cant see your whole network there, at all.

 

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