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Pustulous Tutor
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HP dv2000/6000/8000/9000/tx1000 Video Problems

Same issue here with DV6275/Intel Centrino/Nvidia GO 7400.

 

No internal or external video. Lights come on, hard drive light lights up shortly. LED Flashlight against the screen reveals issue is NOT backlight (external video would have worked fine, anyway). The video fan isn't spinning.

 

I was rejected today by HP support, as not only is my laptop out of warranty (purchased March '08), but my model and P/N aren't listed as having known issues (their words).

 

My sister-in-law works for Nvidia in Beaverton, OR (near the main Nike campus). She told me that Nvidia has identified the issue, and paid HP a ton 'o cashola to compensate repairs for any affected units. I asked which CPU's are affected by this GPU issue, she stated that Nvidia GPU issues do extend to Intel boards as well.

 

So, this clears up and negates the whole "Intel boards are unaffected by these issues" chant.

 

I have an Intel Centrino Core Duo with an Nvidia GO 7400, and it is having issues with the video. The BIOS suggestion doesn't work, as I have to actually see what I am flashing. If I hold down the power button, it takes an average of 7-8 seconds to turn off, which leads me to believe that the OS is loading somewhere in the background.

 

Normally, I'm the guy blaming everything on Intel. Kinda' chuckling, seeing as Intel isn't the one to blame for this round of events.

HP DV6275us RP284UA#ABA (Bricked video)
Intel Centrino Core Duo
Nvidia Geforce GO 7400 (not 'GO'-ing anywhere anymore)
1gb x 2 DDR2 5300
160gb SATA HDD
DVDRW
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
"Wanting to be someone else is a waste of the person you are."

Kurt Cobain
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jasooo Top Student
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I have an Nvidia 8600 defective card, as many people do in their dv9000 series laptop. Updating the BIOS and the driver won't work. Buying a cooler, and cleaning it out won't work either. If your card is beyond an small fix (completely dead), you will need to have the motherboard completely reinstalled. After you get it installed you will need to add a thermal compound/shimmy to buffer the overheating from happening a 2nd time. There are videos all over youtube on how to do this.  If your laptop isn't totally dead yet, just over-heating, use the youtube trick + the cooler and clean it out with compressed air.

 

If you get a case manager to work with you on it, he/she can give you a discounted price for a new motherboard and labor - around 300 bucks. Understandably, HP can't service everyone, because the truth is, more and more people are coming forth with different chipsets complaining that they are defective as well from Nvidia. This is a Nvidia issue.

 

As consumers, I am appalled. I understand your frustrations at HP, but as I checked out the BBB site, I noticed that there are thousands upon thousands of complaints against HP. And a total of 39 for NVIDIA?? Come on people, let's complain to NVIDIA as well. They are the ones that need to give HP the money to fix your laptops. Although HP should be demanding it as well, let's help it along by nipping it in the bud. File a complaint against NVIDIA to get your refund of $300...

 

These are all the complaints logged against NVIDIA:

 

1Making a full refund, as the consumer requested
0Making a partial refund
11Agreeing to perform according to their contract
6Refusing to make an adjustment
2Refuse to adjust, relying on terms of agreement
16Unanswered
3Unassigned
39Total

 

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Pustulous Tutor
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Nvidia notified HP, Dell, and the other major manufacturers over this issue (after receiving a significant number of complaints). Nvidia acknowleged the issue extends to both AMD & Intel boards with Nvidia GPU's. Nvidia has paid HP, Dell, and every other computer dealer compensatory coverage to fix these issues, even though the issue appears to be shoddy soldering to the motherboard (Nvidia doesn't do much soldering, themselves, except for demo units for trade shows).

 

Nvidia has stepped-up and taken responsibility, regardless of who is actually to blame. They have informed all involved parties of the issues, and what products are affected by the issues. The issue affects both AMD & Intel systems. We have only been told that AMD systems were the only ones affected.

 

This might sound like a conspiracy theory, so be warned...

 

How come AMD is being targeted, despite the fact the issue has been acknowleged as being both an AMD AND INTEL issue? Did Intel dump a sum of money to HP to exclude Intel systems, so as to make it look like AMD systems are shoddy and poorly designed? The old AMD processors ran extremely hot. This is a well-known and acknowleged fact. But AMD has made strides towards cooler processors since those days. Yeah, I admit that I'm an AMD fanboy. But I do own an Intel Centrino Core Duo laptop.

 

I feel that HP is ignoring the Intel crowd on this issue. Nvidia already stated the issue isn't just AMD.

 

The other thing to consider is that Nvidia is usually responsible only for providing the technical specifications for each GPU, and manufacturing the GPU themselves. But the issue isn't the physical GPU. It's the soldering. Does anyone know who does the soldering of the GPU to the boards? Is it HP? To my knowlege, Nvidia doesn't solder their GPU's to the boards. The issue isn't a faulty GPU. The issue is faulty soldering done by someone rushing to his/her next smoke break. Blame him/her. Once the solder is heated and the GPU is reseated, the issue is resolved.

HP DV6275us RP284UA#ABA (Bricked video)
Intel Centrino Core Duo
Nvidia Geforce GO 7400 (not 'GO'-ing anywhere anymore)
1gb x 2 DDR2 5300
160gb SATA HDD
DVDRW
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
"Wanting to be someone else is a waste of the person you are."

Kurt Cobain
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scuzz419 Top Student
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I'm having the same problem on my HP Pavillion dv9500 - yet, it's not listed on the recall!  Frustrating as I spent over $1500 for a laptop that didn't last me two years. 

 

Bought:  November 2007

1st Problem: November 2008

2nd Problem: May 2009

3rd Problem: Dec 2009 RIP!

 

Model: dv9500

OS: Vista Home Premium 32-bit

CPU:  AMD Turion 64x2 Dual-Core TL-64

GPU: NVIDIA GeForce Go 7150M

 

What can we do?!?!  Every time I call HP Tech Support, they want $400 to fix it!!!  I spent a lot of this laptop and surely do not have $400 to just give away!!

 

Very very frustrated and former HP / NVidia User!! 

 

 

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jasooo Top Student
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Pustulous, I got my info from the tgdaily read on, I still firmly believe this is an NVIDIA issue. period.:

 

Los Angeles (CA) – A tiny material issue in Nvidia’s GPUs has cost Nvidia $200 million so far: The problem boils down to the solder bump material, in Nvidia’s case high-lead that was used in all of the firm’s GPUs that were produced until late July , and we still do not know how serious the issue really is. According to our sources, Nvidia has switched to eutectic solder bumps in recent weeks and there is now a new, apparently independent research report, that claims that eutectic solder bumps, which are used for example by AMD’s ATI unit, may live much longer than high-lead versions. Of course, switching to eutectic isn’t the entire solution, as the material has a much lower melting point than high-lead.

The research report surfaced late last week on the Electronic Thin Film lab of the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA), a known authority in material sciences. Author K. N. Tu investigated high-lead (90Pb10Sn) as well as eutectic SnPb (60Pb40Sn) and their exposure to fatigue cracking under thermal stress.

Nvidia’s use of high-lead solder joints and temperatures higher than 70 degrees Celsius are generally believed to be the reasons of the GPU failures reported by the company. The underfill is used to redistribute thermal stress: According to Tu, if “the underfill has [a] low glass transition temperature, it becomes soft at the device operation temperature, and the thermal stress will be taken up mostly by the solder joints.  The solder joint at the corners will fail first.” In each cycle, there is elastic deformation as well as plastic deformation.

The analysis is based on the thought that “when the total plastic energy or work-done to the solder is beyond a threshold value, it will crack due to excessive work hardening and sever plastic deformation.” The critical observation is that the plastic energy produced in the high-lead layer is about 100 times larger than in the eutectic SnPb joint - which leads the scientist to believe that “cycle times needs to fail” are “100 times longer” with the eutectic solder bump. Taking into account that he assumed an “ideal model” for his analysis, he concludes that “it is reasonable to say that it is at the least 10 times longer” in a real life model.

The translation is that eutectic solder joints may have a longer life than the high-lead joints, which would ultimately give such a semiconductor a longer life. We were not able to find out whether Tu’s research was actually commissioned by Nvidia or AMD/ATI, but the timing of the release clearly suggests that the results are aimed at shedding some light on the material issue in Nvidia’s GPUs.   

anhyzer Student
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Add me to the list of the $1000+ hp paper weight / door stop owners.  From the horror stories I've read on this forum and others I've been kinda lucky, I could have spent much more and it could have died much sooner.  Unless someone from HP reads this and decides to contact me I'll be cutting my losses now and getting my revenge soon.  Although my problem varies a little from others the end result is the same. DV6226us RP297UA  02/03/07-12/27/09 R.I.P. My laptop was running very smooth until time of death. I'm the "computer guy" within my circle of friends and family and they trust my opinion on what to buy when it comes to computers.  My brother inlaw and my father will be purchasing new laptops soon and I will not allow them to even consider HP.  Now I need to go write reviews on Costco and Amazon and I hope others will do the same.

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mediasponge Student
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This topic just won't go away, will it? Here's another one:

 

dv6338se purchased new in April 2007. Died in Sep 2008 (out of warranty). Called HP. Many phone calls later and me finding the Extended Warranty offer on the web after Customer Support wanted to charge me for repairs, HP agrees to fix laptop under Extended Warranty. Yay! This was in Sep 2008. HP replaced the motherboard, and it worked. One month later, it died again! Same deal, no boot, same as original problem. HP now has system in logs, agrees to fix it again. This time HP replaces with a 6400 series motherboard, puts a new service tag on bottom, and gives me 12 months more warranty protection. Yay! Here we are 15 months later, and it has the dreaded 1-long, 2-short beeps no boot problem. Sigh. Dead motherboard is the most likely cause. FYI, the motherboard they put in mine is a 443774-001, which appears to be in plentiful supply on eBay. HP also lists the 443775-001 as a replacement for dv63xx, 64xx systems.

 

I should have suspected something was wrong because it was running hot. I have repaired many systems over the years, including an IBM Thinkpad A31p that was really top-of-the-line in its day. I disassembled the HP, and surprise, surprise, the heat pipe has thermal foam under it, just like the IBM I had a problem with. The IBM had an Intel processor and an Ati graphics chip, so this is not exclusively an HP/AMD/Nvidia problem. There is a thread over on the Thinkpad forum about thermal foam. There are threads there about reflowing solder balls too. Inside the HP I also see the heat pipe extended over to the area near the power jack. The thermal foam in that area has completely pulled away from the components! The whole problem with thermal foam is that it compresses and shrinks over time. If the laptop runs hot, or is used in a warm ambient, this gets worse and worse. Eventually, the thermal foam is no longer in contact with the heat sources it is supposed to be conducting heat away from, and the system dies. I think part of the reason they use thermal foam is that the relative height of the motherboard components cannot be tightly controlled. The heat pipe is very stiff, stiffer than the motherboard. The foam takes up the height differences so there is no stress on the motherboard. Unfortunately, the thermal foam is not a long-term reliable solution. All I can suggest is running software to monitor the temps and raise alarms.

 

The other thing that bothers me is that you can't buy just the thermal foam. The replacement HP motherboards arrive bare, and the foam is only sold by HP (and others) along with a new fan/heat sink. The IBM board I bought came with foam. Anybody have a source for the thermal foam? Much as I dislike the stuff, it needs to be in there.

 

 

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goddard78 Honor Student
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And another one. DV2754TX,Nvidia C2D 2.0GHz/GeForce 8400M GS, Purchased April 08, Always was a warm running laptop, video started getting intermittently glitchy, then the laptop would start but not boot and blank display, fan and lights on. It Probably only has held out this long, because its my fiance's system and she doesn't 3D game on it much.

 

My fathers DV6000 series with the 7600go died like this a while back.

 

Customer service were very abruot, "sorry not on the list, nothing we can do, goodbye"

 

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danzi100 Student
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I have HDX9000T CTO and have the same problem with video card Nividia GeForce 8800M GST. The secreen goes blank and getting the error you have 1)  "Display driver nvlddmkm stopped responding and has successfully recovered" after 'flickering', then a black screen, and then back to "normal"

 

I did spend $3500 on this computer and will never do that again buying from HP and NVIDIA unlees they take care of thier customers

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kaltax Student
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I have a DV9225 that has been into HP twice already for repairs and still has the problem.  They want me to pay to fix a known problem and smile about it.  I am very disappointed with HP and their tech service dept.   I can think of better things to use for paper weights that are cheaper and much smaller.  I don't know about anybody else but I will think twice about buying anything HP again.

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