Note on archived topics.

This topic has been archived. Information and links in this thread may no longer be available or relevant.
If you have a question create a new topic by clicking here and select the appropriate board.
LUANNE1 Student
Student
1 0 0 0
Message 1 of 3
259
Flag Post
HP Recommended

SPECTRE 360 TERRIBLE BATTERY LIFE

SPECTRE 360
Microsoft Windows 10 (64-bit)

MY HP IS NOT EVEN 8 MONTHS OLD AND I AM ONLY GETTING ABOUT 2 HOURS.  I WAS GETTING 5 WITH MY OLD ENVY WHICH I PASSED DOWN TO MY HUSBAND AND HE STILL GETS LONGER BATTERY LIFE THAN I DO SO WHAT SHOULD I DO?  CAN I JUST GET THE BATTERY REPLACED UNDER WARRANTY OR IS THAT NOT INCLUDED?

0 Kudos
2 REPLIES 2
Associate Professor
Associate Professor
1154 1151 69 138
Message 2 of 3
252
Flag Post
HP Recommended

SPECTRE 360 TERRIBLE BATTERY LIFE


@LUANNE1 wrote:

MY HP IS NOT EVEN 8 MONTHS OLD AND I AM ONLY GETTING ABOUT 2 HOURS.  I WAS GETTING 5 WITH MY OLD ENVY WHICH I PASSED DOWN TO MY HUSBAND AND HE STILL GETS LONGER BATTERY LIFE THAN I DO SO WHAT SHOULD I DO?  CAN I JUST GET THE BATTERY REPLACED UNDER WARRANTY OR IS THAT NOT INCLUDED?


If you think the battery life only lasts 2 hours then I would highly suggest to just ask for a replacement. Anyway i'll inlcude documentations on how you can calibrate or properly set the settings in order for you to optimize your laptops battery life. Please take time to read the articles.

 

How to Improve Battery Life with Windows 10’s New Power Settings

 

While Windows 10 is getting a lot of press for its “new” Start menu, beyond that there’s still a lot of stuff most users who skipped Windows 8 probably don’t know about. Today we want to talk about Windows 10’s power and battery settings.

The quickest way to access the settings is to open the Action Center and click “All settings”.

 

 

On the resulting screen, click the “System” group.

 

 

There are two power-related categories we want to visit, the first will apply to users regardless of whether they’re using a laptop or desktop. These are the “Power & sleep” settings.

The first group concerns when your computer screen turns off when it is on battery or plugged in, while the second group lets you designate when it sleeps.

 

 

At the bottom of the “Power & sleep” settings is another category “Related settings” with a link to access “Additional power settings”.

 

 

The “Additional power settings” actually open the “Power Options” control panel. Anyone who’s used Windows for the past few versions is likely familiar with it.

 

 

The other settings category we want to explore are the “Battery Saver Settings”, which are new to Windows 10.

The New Battery Saver

The battery saver feature is similar to the same kind of tools found in mobile phones and tablets.

When the battery falls below a certain level (20% by default), it will turn the battery saver on automatically, which will institute battery saving features such as limiting background activities and push notifications.

The battery saver is off by default, and obviously it won’t turn on if the device is charging.

 

 

If you tap or click the “Battery use” link, it will give you a basic sense of what system components are consuming power and in what time frame.

 

 

To change which apps can run in the background, tap or click the link “Change background app settings”. Background apps can “receive info, send notifications, and stay up-to-date, even when you’re not using them” so if there’s anything here you don’t use, it’s best to tap it “Off” so it doesn’t consume battery unnecessarily.

 

 

To configure the battery saver, click or tap the “Battery saver settings” link at the bottom. These settings will allow you to set when (or if) the battery saver turns on. By default, the battery saver is configured to turn on at 20% but you can set that higher or lower.

There are two other options which will allow push notifications and lower screen brightness.

 

 

Finally, let’s say you do have battery saver configured to turn on and it suppresses an important app that you need to run in the background. Click “Add an app” and you will be able to add apps that are always allowed to run while battery saver is on.

 

 

Using the “Power & Sleep” and “Battery Saver” is going to definitely let you extend your battery’s endurance. Being able to configure when the screen times out and when the device goes into low power consumption mode are simple but effective ways to add time to your laptop’s trips away from the outlet.

 
 
How to See Which Applications Are Draining Your Battery on Windows 10

 

 

Windows 10 includes a new “Battery Use” screen that shows you what’s draining your laptop’s juice. That means it’ll tell you exactly what apps–both desktop and Windows 10 “universal” apps–are using too much power.

This feature is part of the “Battery saver” screen in the new Settings app. Like some of Windows 10’s other new features, it was originally part of Windows Phone, but came to the desktop when Windows 10 was released. It’ll break down how much battery power your display and other hardware uses, too.

 
How to See Which Applications Are Draining Your Battery on Windows 10
Windows 10 includes a new “Battery Use” screen that shows you what’s draining your laptop’s juice. That means it’ll tell you... [Read Article]

This feature is new to Windows 10, so you won’t find it anywhere in the old Control Panel. It’s located in the new Settings app, which you can launch by clicking or tapping the “Settings” option in the Start menu.

In the Settings app, select “System” and then select “Battery saver.” You can also just type “Battery saver” into the Cortana search box and select the “Battery saver” option to go directly to this screen.

 

 

On the right side of the screen, you’ll see an overview that displays how much battery life you have remaining, and how much time Windows estimates you’ll get from that. Click or tap the “Battery use” link under this heading to see more details.

Analyze Your Power Usage

By default, the Battery Use screen will show information from the last 24 hours. However, you can also have it show information from the last 48 hours, or from the last week.

To change this setting, click or tap the dropdown box under “Showing battery use across all apps from the last” at the top of the screen and select “24 Hours,” “48 Hours,” or “1 Week.”

 

 

Below this box, you’ll see “System,” “Display,” and “Wi-Fi” percentages. This shows how much battery power has been used by system processes, the display, and your Wi-Fi radio.

You’ll probably see that the display is using quite a bit of power. To alleviate that, try lowering your screen’s brightness, or tell your display go to sleep more often in Settings > System > Power & Sleep.

 

The “In use” and “Background” options show how much power is used by applications while you’re using them, compared to applications running in the background.

If apps are using power in the background, you can click or tap the “Change background app settings” link and configure apps to not run in the background. This only works for universal Windows 10 apps. They won’t automatically receive notifications, fetch new data for live tiles, or perform other background tasks. This can help you save battery power, especially if you don’t actually use those new Windows 10 apps.

 

 

Scroll down further and you’ll see a list of applications. This is the most useful part of the list, as it lists your desktop applications as well as universal apps. It’ll display a list of the apps have have used battery power in that period, and show you what percentage of your battery power each app has used.

If an app doesn’t appear in the list here, you never used it while you were on battery, so it never consumed any battery power.

 

 

You can view more information about a specific application’s energy usage by clicking or tapping it and then selecting the “Details” button. You’ll be able to see how what percentage of power the app used for system processes, the display, and Wi-Fi. You’ll also be able to see how much power the app used while you were actively using it, and how much it used when running in the background.

As with the overview of all apps on the main screen, you can choose to view details for the last 24 hours, 48 hours, or one week. For example, here’s how much battery Google Chrome used on my laptop in the past 48 hours:

 

 

You may see the word “Allowed” beneath some Windows 10 universal apps in the list. This indicates they’re allowed to run in the background. You can select an app and then select the “Details” button to see more details. From here, you can disable the “Allow this app to run in the background” option and prevent the app from using power in the background.

 

 

How to Increase Your Laptop or Tablet’s Battery Life
 
How to Increase Your Windows Laptop’s Battery Life
We often fixate on smartphone battery life, but most laptops still don’t have all-day battery life. Rather than always using...

There’s no way around it: All applications you use will drain battery, and whatever applications you use the most will likely rank high in the list. Demanding applications–for example, demanding PC games or video compression programs–will also use a lot of energy.

The Battery usage screen provides options for controlling whether Windows 10 apps can run in the background, which should help you if you’re using that type of app. But there’s no way to control Windows desktop apps from the Settings screen.

 

If a desktop application is sucking down a lot of power while running in the background, you may be able to save power by closing it when you’re not using it. If an application is using a lot of power while you’re using it, there’s not necessarily much you can do. You could try looking for an alternative application that isn’t as power hungry, or try to make the application more lightweight–for example, by uninstalling browser extensions, enabling click-to-play plug-ins, and having fewer tabs open at once in your web browser.

It’s not just apps, either–plenty of other settings can affect your battery life. The display backlight uses quite a bit of power, so lowering your display brightness will help. Having your PC automatically sleep more quickly can also help if you’re not in the habit of putting it to sleep when you step away. Check out our guide to Windows battery life for more details on getting the most out of your laptop or tablet.

"Education costs money; so does Ignorance"

If my post has helped you, click the Kudos Thumbs up!
If it solved your issue, Click the "Accept as Solution" button so others can benefit from the question you asked!


0 Kudos
Provost Provost
Provost
38140 37960 5795 10068
Message 3 of 3
249
Flag Post
HP Recommended

SPECTRE 360 TERRIBLE BATTERY LIFE

Have you run the battery diagnostic either within HP Support Assistant or in the UEFI diagnostics (F2)? Yes, the battery is covered by the warranty, but it is not easy to get HP to honor a warranty claim on a battery that still works to some extent. Still, the amount your battery life has declined may indicate a hardware issue like a dead cell and if you can show that you have a dead cell HP will very likely replace it for you. I would say they will replace it but I am not in a position to make promises as I do not work for HP. 

 

Also as you know the battery is internal so it is not as easy as HP's just sending you a replacement. It would have to be sent in for warranty repair unless you have onsite. 

 

Post back with any more questions.

0 Kudos

Note on archived topics.

This topic has been archived. Information and links in this thread may no longer be available or relevant.
If you have a question create a new topic by clicking here and select the appropriate board.
† The opinions expressed above are the personal opinions of the authors, not of HP. By using this site, you accept the Terms of Use and Rules of Participation