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imbilalbutt
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Upgrading processor from 2nd generation to 8th

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Hp Elitebook 8460p
Microsoft Windows 10 (64-bit)

I am using hp elitebook 8460p, with 2nd generation i7 processor, can anyone tell me that can I replace this processor with new 8th generation i7 processor? Will the architecture of 8460p will accept it?

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Paul_Tikkanen
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Hi:

 

That would not be physically possible.  

 

The 8th gen processors are integrated into the motherboard.

 

Not to mention that the Mobile Intel series 6 chipset would not support that processor even if you could install it.

 

 

 

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imbilalbutt
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Thank you for your attention Paul,

Alright, If 8th generation is integerated into motherboard. Can I transplant any lower generation core , I don't know, say 5th generation or so in hp 8460p. 

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Paul_Tikkanen
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You're very welcome.

 

No, you can't.

 

You can only install the supported processors listed at the link below in your notebook, page 6.

 

http://static.highspeedbackbone.net/pdf/HP_EliteBook_8460p_8560p_QuickSpecs.pdf

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David_J_W
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Paul's answers are spot on, though I felt it potentially useful to add some more general comments.

 

 

It is not unusual for each new generation of processors to be accompanied by a new support chipset. When a chipset is compatible with a subsequent generation of processors to that it was originally released with, this future compatibility is normally only for one generation or at the most two generations. Compatibility with subsequent processor generations typically needs the motherboard vendor to release a BIOS upgrade to add support. In other words, a chipset for seventh generation Core might be compatible with eighth generation Core if a suitable BIOS is installed before the processor swap, but is unlikely to be compatible with ninth generation Core. It will be unlikely that upgrading from one processor generation to the next is worthwhile.

 

In any event, it is now standard for laptop processors to be soldered to the motherboard, meaning the processor and chipset are permanently wedded together and can only be upgraded by changing the system board. Each system board is designed for a particular product range and enclosure. In some cases, an upgraded version of a model is released with upgraded processors in the same housing - in that case it may be possible to swap to the newer system board though probably not cost effective to do so to leap forward by a single generation.

 

As laptops get physically smaller to fit market demands, it is increasingly common for memory to be soldered to the motherboard, especially in the 'ultrabook' market segment. Even when memory is not soldered, chipset support for memory types and minimum speeds moves on over time to match developments in the memory marketplace. You can't use DDR2 memory in a current generation machine and DDR3 is gradually being phased out.

 

Once you start considering upgrading from a laptop of say, six years ago to a modern specification, you start hitting other issues to do with changing standards over time. Laptop display panels are now routinely connected via a variant of DisplayPort, the older mini-PCI Express standard for wireless cards has been replaced by M.2 (which amounts to pretty much the same thing in a smaller form factor), increasingly mass storage is M.2 format solid state drives with limited / no support for 2.5 inch SATA drives and so on.

 

 

Sadly, all this means that the often the most that can be done to upgrade a laptop is increase the available RAM (if modules rather than soldered memory are used), also upgrade the storage to replace hard disks with solid state drives and/or faster SSDs than were originally fitted. In some cases, limited upgrades to wireless hardware are possible. It is possible to replace worn out batteries for a certain length of time after the system is released, then the parts become unavailable.

 

If this level of upgrading doesn't produce the desired uplift in performance and capability, it is a case of buying a newer laptop, perhaps moving the older machine to a secondary role or, if it still has some value, selling it.

 

 

If you wish to carry out piecemeal upgrades over time, you are probably better off with a desktop computer system. You will have more flexibility if you build a desktop system from components available in the retail market rather than start with a branded system from the likes of HP.

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