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HP Recommended
HP ENVY Phoenix Desktop - 860-014 (ENERGY STAR)
Microsoft Windows 10 (64-bit)

My desktop pc won’t turn on. I have tried all of the suggestions I could find and nothing is having any effect(including a hard reset).

1) The green light right next to the power cord at the back is on.
2) When I press the power button nothing happens, no fans, no monitor, no beeps, no bios, nothing at all EXCEPT:
The light mentioned in step 1 goes out.
3) To get the light mentioned in step 1 to come back on I need to pull the power cord out and plug it back in.
4) I also replaced the CMOS battery.

How can I find out where the problem is, i.e. power supply, motherboard, other? I do not have spare parts lying around to try swapping the power supply for instance.

I really do not want to replace this machine. I recently(a few weeks ago) added a 1TB SSD drive(making it my root drive). There is nothing it cannot do that I need.

Thank you.

1 ACCEPTED SOLUTION

Accepted Solutions
HP Recommended

"I cannot be more "obvious" than to list the following choices." 
Obvious - easy to see or understand; self evident. 
Exactly. 
Few people need to be told the "obvious", they already know it.

But I found someone with useful(that is non-obvious) advice elsewhere.
1) Using that advice I was able to test the power supply and determine it was not the problem. No "spare" part was needed.
2) That left the motherboard. Additional advice explained how I could test the motherboard and components attached to it to see if I could discover the problem there. Using that advice I found the video card to be the issue.

Good intentions aren't enough.

View solution in original post

4 REPLIES 4
HP Recommended

@elric132 -- How can I find out where the problem is, i.e. power supply, motherboard, other? I do not have spare parts lying around to try swapping the power supply for instance.

 

If you do not have a spare power-supply, and you do not have any "technophile" friends who may have a spare power-supply, you have two options:

 

1. if the computer is less than 12 months old, contact HP Support to make a claim against the warranty. HP will repair/replace your computer, at HP's expense.

 

2. take your computer to a local owner/operator computer store, to pay for professional assistance. The store's business depends on having a reputation for providing good technical trouble-shooting & repairs -- they are much better than any "Computer-Geeks-With-A-Jeep" mobile service.

 

HP Recommended

1. No, my (just turned) 4 year old computer is not under warranty.

2. "take your computer to a local owner/operator computer store, to pay for professional assistance." - Does not actually answer my question in a useful/nonobvious way.

HP Recommended

@elric132 -- Does not actually answer my question in a useful/nonobvious way.

 

I cannot be more "obvious" than to list the following choices. Either:

 

1. you have the technical skills and spare parts in order to "part-swap" to solve your issue,

 

2. you have a "technophile" friend who has the skills and spare parts to help,

 

3. you need to hire a certified computer technician, who presumably has the skills, and can order the spare-parts, or can cannibalize the needed parts from an otherwise-dead computer that they accepted as a "trade-in" on a brand-new computer.

 

HP Recommended

"I cannot be more "obvious" than to list the following choices." 
Obvious - easy to see or understand; self evident. 
Exactly. 
Few people need to be told the "obvious", they already know it.

But I found someone with useful(that is non-obvious) advice elsewhere.
1) Using that advice I was able to test the power supply and determine it was not the problem. No "spare" part was needed.
2) That left the motherboard. Additional advice explained how I could test the motherboard and components attached to it to see if I could discover the problem there. Using that advice I found the video card to be the issue.

Good intentions aren't enough.

† The opinions expressed above are the personal opinions of the authors, not of HP. By using this site, you accept the <a href="https://www8.hp.com/us/en/terms-of-use.html" class="udrlinesmall">Terms of Use</a> and <a href="/t5/custom/page/page-id/hp.rulespage" class="udrlinesmall"> Rules of Participation</a>.