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HP Recommended
HP ENVY Phoenix 810-130qe CTO Desktop Pc
Microsoft Windows 8.1 (64-bit)

Questions: 

  1. Can this error code be repaired?
  2.  How do I fix it?
  3. Do I need a new internal hard drive
  4. If so, can you recommend which one to buy?

Semi - Technical and all assistance would be greatly appreciated.

Thank you in advance.

Own PC Envy but didn't show up in Product Name

Failure code: GGD441-6SPB26-QFFWWK-625D03

 

1 ACCEPTED SOLUTION

Accepted Solutions
HP Recommended

Hi

@BY361 

just in case ..
it looks like you have a hard drive problem
only it is postponed
Hard Disk 2 Optimized

GGD441-6SPB26-QFFWWK-625D03OK 3/11/22308StorageFloppy Drive, Hard Drive, Memory Drive, Optical Drive, SCSI, Tape DriveHard Disk 2 Optimized


You therefore indicated that you have a 2 TB HDD hard drive
only, you should check, what configuration do you have exactly
as can be seen here

HP ENVY Phoenix 810-130qe Product Specifications and Configurable Options
there are different options

Must select one of the following options:
  • 2 TB 7200 RPM SATA 6G
  • 3 TB 7200 RPM SATA 6G
  • 2 x 1 TB drives in RAID 0 (2 TB usable storage capacity), 7200 rpm, SATA 6G
  • 2 x 2 TB drives in RAID 1 (2 TB usable storage capacity), 7200 rpm, SATA 6G
  • 3 x 1 TB drives in RAID 5 (2 TB usable storage capacity), 7200 rpm, SATA 6G
  • 3 x 2 TB drives in RAID 5 (4 TB usable storage capacity), 7200 rpm, SATA 6G
  • 128 GB SATA Solid State Drive
  • 256 GB SATA Solid State Drive
Second Hard Drive
Must select one of the following options:
  • No second hard drive
  • 2 TB 7200 RPM SATA 6G
  • 3 TB 7200 RPM SATA 6G

 

so it might be that you only have a problem with the data disk..
in this case, if you replace it, remove it, there may be no need to do anything for the windows system, which could be installed on an ssd
Backing up your personal data from this damaged disk may be enough

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8 REPLIES 8
HP Recommended

@BY361 --  is this your computer: HP ENVY Phoenix 810-130qe Product Specifications and Configurable Options | HP® Customer Support

 

Your questions:

 

Can this error code be repaired?

 

No. The disk-drive is failing -- no longer reliable for everyday use.

Your computer was factory-loaded with Windows 8, and it was manufactured in November 2013.

So, your disk-drive could be over 8 years old -- it has served you well.

Note that Microsoft's ten-year support window for Windows 8 will end in early 2023, 

and Microsoft's support window for Windows 10 will end in October 2025.

You might try the free update to Windows 10, but I doubt that your computer will run Windows 11.

 

 How do I fix it?

 

If there is any residual "life" remaining in the disk-drive, the free version of the Macrium Reflect software can be used to "clone" the current disk-drive onto a new HDD (hard-disk drive) or onto a new SSD (solid-state device). Then, boot from the new disk-drive.

 

Do I need a new internal hard drive

 

Yes, either a new HDD, or, for much-better performance, purchase a SSD.

 

If so, can you recommend which one to buy?

 

Currently, the price for a 500 GB SSD is similar to that for a 1000 GB HDD, but the SSD will be 5 times faster.

Do you need more than 500 GB?

 

I have had several brands of SSD in different computers. 

All have worked well.

So, shop by "price", rather than by manufacturer, unless you want to do a lot of research, to find which SSD has the fastest data-transfer rate.

However, your old motherboard may only support "SATA 2" input/output speeds (3 Gb/second) not "SATA 3" (6 Gb/second).

 

HP Recommended

Currently. Have a seagate barracuda 2000gb

2TB 7200 RPM SATA 6g 1st Hard drive (description taken from delivery inventory slip)

Should be ok with SATA 3. 

This hard drive is 3/4 full.  Mostly pictures and videos that can be of loaded into external drive to free up space.  

question:  Once cloned, can the old drive be removed and the cables from the old drive replaced the cables on the new?  So computer sees the new (d) drive as (c)?   Or are they extra steps?     Thanks in advance.  

 

 

HP Recommended

@BY361 --  Once cloned, can the old drive be removed and the cables from the old drive replaced the cables on the new?

 

Yes, that is the correct action. But, there is a better solution, below, that spends less of your money.

 

Hint: while "cloning", if you intend to boot your computer from a USB memory-stick that contains the "cloning" software, you temporarily will not be using your CD/DVD device.  So, the "power" and "data" cables that usually connect to that device can be disconnected from the device, and connected to the brand-new disk-drive, to connect the "target" of the cloning operation.  This trick avoids the need for an extra SATA cable, and an extra power-cable.

 

Because you have 3/4 of 2 terabytes, this will make for a high cost to purchase a 2 TB SSD, such as $300 (CAD) for:

https://www.amazon.ca/Samsung-Internal-MZ-77E2T0B-AM-Version/dp/B08QB93S6R/

Ouch!

Compare $300 to $70 (CAD) for a new HDD: https://www.amazon.ca/Seagate-Barracuda-Internal-Drive-3-5-Inch/dp/B07H2RR55Q/

 

Since the current disk-drive is "failing", your idea of "offloading" much of that data is a good one.

 

The big problems that you will have are:

  1. having enough remaining "life" in your disk-drive, to complete the "offloading" file-copy;
  2. having enough remaining "life" in your disk-drive, to delete the files, to see how much disk-space is still allocated;
  3. because the remaining files could be scattered all over the disk-drive, not just "compacted" at the start of the disk-drive, the cloning software will replicate that "scattering", and the software will demand that the "target" of the cloning process will be required to have the capacity.  Compare to moving your library of books (scattered on various shelves in your bookcase) into a different bookcase.  While you might want to physically gather all the books, and put them side-by-side on ONE shelf of a smaller bookcase, the cloning software will not do that "compaction". 

Since your current disk-drive is "failing", DO NOT USE the Windows Disk Defragmenter app to "compact" your current disk-drive.  That is a large amount of input/output -- the worst thing that you can do to a "failing" disk-drive that contains the ONLY copy of your files. 

 

So, what can you do, for #3, above? 

 

Instead of #1 and #2 and # above, try:

  1. purchase a 2 TB HDD (not a much-more expensive 2 TB SSD);
  2. connect the new HDD;
  3. "clone" from your current disk-drive onto the new HDD;
  4. shutdown;
  5. remove the old disk-drive from your computer, label it, and set it aside -- just in case the following steps don't work;
  6. start-up your computer and use BIOS SETUP to configure your computer to boot from the new HDD, to automatically make it the "C:" drive-letter;
  7. boot from the new HDD;
  8. copy all your personal files to your external disk-drive;
  9. verify that you can read the files from the external disk-drive;
  10. delete those files from your new HDD;
  11. measure how much disk-drive is currently used, e.g., 80 GB (for Windows & your apps);
  12. use the Windows Disk Defragmenter to "compact" your new HDD, to arrange the remaining files at the "start" of the file-system on the new HDD;
  13. purchase an SSD that is, for example, at least twice that measured value. So, the hope is that the price for a 500 GB SSD is much lower than for a 2 TB SSD;
  14. clone from your new HDD onto the new SSD;
  15. shutdown, and remove the new HDD;
  16. restart your computer, and use BIOS SETUP to set the SSD as the ONLY bootable device;
  17. verify that booting from the SSD is OK -- without the new HDD physically connected;
  18. shutdown, and reconnect the new HDD;
  19. restart your computer. The SSD will be "C:" and the new HDD will be "D:", and your CD/DVD will be "E:".
  20. copy all your personal files from your external device onto "D:".

So, the result is:

  1. your computer is quickly booting & running from the SSD;
  2. you saved a lot of money, by avoiding the purchase of a 2 TB SSD;
  3. your personal files are now on "D:", where "D:" is NOT your "failing" disk-drive;
  4. you have a backup copy of your files on the external disk-drive;
  5. in a dire emergency, you have another copy of your files on the "archived" HDD;
  6. Windows and your apps will run quickly from the SSD,
  7. your files, which you only infrequently use, are stored on the new HDD,
  8. the new SSD and the new HDD are reliable media, unlike the old HDD.

Yes, this is long-winded, but the primary reason is to use your current, but failing, disk-drive as little as possible.

 

I hope this helps.

 

HP Recommended

Hi

@BY361 

just in case ..
it looks like you have a hard drive problem
only it is postponed
Hard Disk 2 Optimized

GGD441-6SPB26-QFFWWK-625D03OK 3/11/22308StorageFloppy Drive, Hard Drive, Memory Drive, Optical Drive, SCSI, Tape DriveHard Disk 2 Optimized


You therefore indicated that you have a 2 TB HDD hard drive
only, you should check, what configuration do you have exactly
as can be seen here

HP ENVY Phoenix 810-130qe Product Specifications and Configurable Options
there are different options

Must select one of the following options:
  • 2 TB 7200 RPM SATA 6G
  • 3 TB 7200 RPM SATA 6G
  • 2 x 1 TB drives in RAID 0 (2 TB usable storage capacity), 7200 rpm, SATA 6G
  • 2 x 2 TB drives in RAID 1 (2 TB usable storage capacity), 7200 rpm, SATA 6G
  • 3 x 1 TB drives in RAID 5 (2 TB usable storage capacity), 7200 rpm, SATA 6G
  • 3 x 2 TB drives in RAID 5 (4 TB usable storage capacity), 7200 rpm, SATA 6G
  • 128 GB SATA Solid State Drive
  • 256 GB SATA Solid State Drive
Second Hard Drive
Must select one of the following options:
  • No second hard drive
  • 2 TB 7200 RPM SATA 6G
  • 3 TB 7200 RPM SATA 6G

 

so it might be that you only have a problem with the data disk..
in this case, if you replace it, remove it, there may be no need to do anything for the windows system, which could be installed on an ssd
Backing up your personal data from this damaged disk may be enough

--------------------------------------------- Signature ---------------------------------------------
was this reply helpful , or just say thank you ? Click on the yes button

Please remember to mark the answers this can help other users
please click on the accept as solution button if message provided an answer to the problem




Desktop-Knowledge-Base
Windows 11 22h2 inside , user

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
HP Recommended

@BY361 -- Backing up your personal data from this damaged disk may be enough

 

No. That is bad advice from the Other Person.

 

Eventually, when the disk-drive COMPLETELY fails -- as it eventually will -- you will have to purchase a new HDD, as I previously recommended.  But, unless you create a backup every day, some of your "newest" files will not be contained in a previous backup.

 

HP Recommended

"This hard drive is 3/4 full. Mostly pictures and videos that can be of loaded into external drive to free up space. "

User has personal data on a potentially damaged hard drive
Why is it ridiculous to try to save them, if it's still possible, if he has an external disk or or otherwise somewhere else , before it's too late

Now I give advice to a user no matter if it suits you .. the user tries, or not .. it's up to him
My advice remains valid, check if there are several hdd / SSD hard drives

Good continuation and I hope you can repair your computer quickly, without problem @BY361 

 

 

--------------------------------------------- Signature ---------------------------------------------
was this reply helpful , or just say thank you ? Click on the yes button

Please remember to mark the answers this can help other users
please click on the accept as solution button if message provided an answer to the problem




Desktop-Knowledge-Base
Windows 11 22h2 inside , user

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
HP Recommended

Thank you all.  Using iPhone to post this. 
will install Hdd. Then clone, and wait till 8.1 (ETA 2023)is not supported to invest in new computer.

 

 This provides  a short term need while buying time for upgrade.  

Thank you all for your insights.  Good bless. 

HP Recommended

@Prométhée -- Why is it ridiculous to try to save them, if it's still possible, if he has an external disk or or otherwise somewhere else , before it's too late.

 

Your comment does not help the author solve the issue. Please refrain from posting "meta" discussions.

 

It is ONLY you who is making the claim of it being "ridiculous".   Please reread what I wrote.

† The opinions expressed above are the personal opinions of the authors, not of HP. By using this site, you accept the <a href="https://www8.hp.com/us/en/terms-of-use.html" class="udrlinesmall">Terms of Use</a> and <a href="/t5/custom/page/page-id/hp.rulespage" class="udrlinesmall"> Rules of Participation</a>.