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CTJets13
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Can I move this motherboard to a new case? Omen Desktop

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Omen 870-290
Microsoft Windows 10 (64-bit)

I recently purchased a used HP Omen 870-290. I have done a few things so far such as switching the ram and everything. I took a pic of the motherboard while I had it open. This is the model:

IPM17-TP

 

My bigger goal is to switch this over to a new case for cooling and aesthetic purposes. However, I want to make sure the motherboard will work in a different case. From what I’ve read, it seems like it can be done I just want to be sure. I don’t even know if I have a warranty, so I’m not worried about that part of it. I just do not want to replace the motherboard yet, but would like to be able to get a new case. 

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Jay891
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If you have an ATX case on hand, you can try moving them over.

 

Like I can see that your motherboard looks like it followed uATX / mATX standard.  It looks like it should fit any case that is set up for mATX (you have to move a standoff usually, the one for the lower right hole).

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CTJets13
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I wish I did, but I’m trying to make sure before I purchase one. So would both an ATX or mATX case possibly work? 

I’m wondering if there is a good way to check this before I do it all. Maybe taking a picture of it and comparing it to a standard one online? 

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Jay891
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That's basically what I did, compared picture of the motherboard from the HP link (google your motherboard name or the HP model name) to a generic mATX board (in my case a random ASUS board).  The holes seem to follow the same pattern.

 

You are lucky that HP included a decent board in the one you bought, with what looks like a standard ATX power supply.

 

The only sure way is to try it.

 

My last build was mATX.  Most cases will show you on the product page if they can fit various sizes of boards.

 

Like the Phanteks p300A that I used, took mATX without a problem beyond moving one stand off.

 

But the case has to have removable standoffs.  Most commercially sold cases do so they can accommodate various sizes of boards.  OEM ones won't work often because the standoffs aren't moveable.

 

You can get a mATX case but ATX mid tower is the most common and most useful.

 

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CTJets13
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I really want to try it, but am scared of tearing everything out and then it not working lol! I appreciate the info a lot! It all worked out for you? Do the cases typically have the standoff information listed on their site? 

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Jay891
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Usually the case product pages have it color coded in the pictures  and if you are buying anything decent it will work just fine.  Like most of the prebuilt "gaming PC" made by better brands use mATX boards in an ATX case. 

 

 Provided the HP holes are exactly to standard.

 

I mean if you really wanted to take it out and circles the holes on a piece of paper and take measurements you could.  But it looks like it matches.

 

In my case, I had a HP pavilion "gaming"  pc (really overheating office PC with good specs) I needed to buy a new motherboard, new power supply, new  case, new CPU cooler, new ram.  By the time I was done it was about 80% new computer. But that was because the new HPs have proprietary boards, undesirable proprietary power supplies, crappy coolers, etc.

 

And I went with mATX because in my old PC I never even used any of the ATX functionality (extra PCI slots I'm never going to use).

 

So yeah it should go easier for you just because your  board looks like it follows the standard (whereas mine didn't...I watched a YouTuber move the HP pavilion ITX board to a full size case and realize the standoffs don't match anywhere close.).

 

I'm glad I did too because everything in the HP PC was done for money reasons and just not functional or aesthetically pleasing.

 

I'm very happy with my Phantek p300a.  I love how the front panel just pops off and the hard drives can just pull out, no tools needed.  Great airflow.

 

 

 

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