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ClemP
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Message 1 of 11
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Does my HP Envy 700-406 have TPM (2.0) enabled?

HP Recommended
Envy 700-406
Microsoft Windows 10 (64-bit)

I'd like to upgrade to Windows 11 when it's available. When I ran the compatibility app (from MS), it said my system is not compatible because of it not having TPM 2.0 and Secure Boot enabled. When I checked for TPM by entering "TPM" at the command prompt, the response was the no TPM was detected.

 

Is there a way to enable TPM on my system or am I stuck with having to buy a new system when Windows 11 comes out (if I still want to upgrade)?

 

I am a retired PC Systems Consultant/Tech of over 30 years so, I can get as technical as necessary and am not afraid to get into the hardware or software.

 

Thanks!

Clem

10 REPLIES 10
itsmyname
Level 9
5,033 4,948 232 647
Message 2 of 11
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>  I'd like to upgrade to Windows 11 when it's available.

 

My initial reading indicates "end of 2021".

 

> Is there a way to enable TPM on my system

 

Enter BIOS SETUP, and see if you can enable it.

 

> am I stuck with having to buy a new system when Windows 11 comes out 

 

Windows 10 will be supported until 2025. By that time, your hardware will be ready for "retirement".

 

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ClemP
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Message 3 of 11
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Thanks for the quick reply, Itsmyname! I think I wasn't clear about my question. I was hoping that someone (perhaps an HP moderator...) would see the question and let me know if my model (and the included MS-7906 motherboard) has a TPM chip that can be enabled and then, how to enable it.

 

Thanks again, Itsmyname!

 

Clem

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KirklandUser
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Message 4 of 11
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After enabling the module in the Bios you may need to go to device manager and remove the device from the list and re-scan the hardware in order to get the best configuration.

 

True that support for Win10 goes to 2025, but what about Win7 and Win 8 systems that were upgraded to a Win10 outer shell but may not be supported by MS after the clocks for their inner Win7 and Win 8 cores run down?

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ClemP
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Message 5 of 11
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Thanks for your feedback, KirklandUser. However, the obstacles I'm encountering are as follows:

  1. When I entered the UEFI BIOS, there was no specific option for TPM under "Security" or anywhere else in the BIOS settings, The only option I found that I saw mentioned in another post about TPM was the "Secure Boot" option. It was disabled, so I enabled it.
  2. After enabling the "Secure Boot" option, I looked in the Device Manager. Not only is there no TPM entry, there is not even a "Security Devices" entry anywhere. This lends credence to the fact that it's very possible that this motherboard does not support TPM or, at least, there is no TPM device installed on the board.

The one thing I have not done yet, is open the case and examine the motherboard to see if there is an empty TPM header where I can install an optional TPM board. Once I do examine it, I'll post my findings here. I've checked the motherboard specs on the HP site, but they do not mention any info regarding the headers available on the motherboard.

Clem

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KirklandUser
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My 12 year old BIOS doesn't use the actual term TPM, it uses words like embedded security device.

 

The device manager may post the security device in another list other than under Security Devices.

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CPatafio
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Thanks for the reply, KirklandUser. I've checked every option in the BIOS and found nothing about security devices, TPM, or any possibly related options. As mentioned in my original post, I only found the option to enable/disable "Secure Boot", which I enabled.

 

As for the Device Manager, same results. I actually checked EVERY entry in my Device Manager and found nothing that referred to any security devices or options, embedded or otherwise.

 

Unless i find a header on the motherboard that accepts a TPM chip, I've resigned myself to the fact that the only way I'll be able to run Windows 11 on my current desktop (HP Envy 700-406) will be either through some type of workaround (I've seen articles on substituting a modified appraiserres.dll file) or within a VM (I've used Oracle VM VirtualBox for years). My only alternative is to upgrade to a new desktop when the urge to use Windows 11 is greater than the urge to save money...:)

 

BTW, I've actually created a Windows 11 VM (using VirtualBox) on my desktop using the latest Win 11 ISO and it works just fine. Go figure...

 

Clem

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DM681
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@CPatafio wrote:

 

BTW, I've actually created a Windows 11 VM (using VirtualBox) on my desktop using the latest Win 11 ISO and it works just fine. Go figure...

 

Clem


Hi Clem, 
I find this interesting, "Win 11 ISO"?  Where did you get it and when?  Insiders are not going to have access to 11 until sometime this coming week.  How did you get the ISO?

 

DM681

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KirklandUser
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I looked up the products specs for your machine and there is no reference to an embedded security device feature.

 

On the motherboard specs there is no mention either.

 

And on the photo of the motherboard there is no 20 (2 x 10) pin mini-header which would be required to attach an outboard TPM module.

 

The whole purpose of TPM is to create a physical hardware vault where one can be store the keys to the kingdom, a vault that can only be opened with a password which would be difficult to duplicate.

 

Any workaround which would allow the vault to be a virtual one defeats the intention of the technology, however if it is possible, then someone who has important data to protect would never place it in a virtual environment which could be hacked.

 

Since most consumers like myself operate in an environment where we normally don't encrypt our data, we probably wouldn't be concerned if we operated a Windows 11 system in a virtual space that wasn't really as secure as the OS would falsely  believe.

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CPatafio
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Hi DM681,

It was one of the leaked beta versions. It works to an extent. Not all features are enabled yet. That's why I loaded it into a VM. I can't wait to get my hands on a full version so that I can install it into a VM. Perhaps, then I'll know whether my PC will be compatible with Win 11...:)

 

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