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HP Recommended
HP Z800 Base Model Workstation

I would like to add a Startech (https://www.startech.com/en-us/hdd/pex4m2e1) x4 PCI Express 3,0 to M.2 PCIe NVMe SSD Adapter to my Z800 workstation (and NVMe SSD drive). I have the available slot, but I remain unsure as to whether I will be able to boot to this drive because my current BIOS 3.61 does not seem to have a way of recognizing/changing it to UEFI.

 

Am I correct in assuming that I would not be able to Boot to this drive because of the legacy BIOS?

 

Is there a workaround?

 

Many thanks for any help provided - it is appreciated.

 

1 ACCEPTED SOLUTION

Accepted Solutions
HP Recommended

@Scholiast wrote:

Erico,

 

Thanks so much for the prompt reply! Not the answer I was hoping for, but you confirmed my suspicion. If I could bother you a little more:

1) Would, with a NVM (not a NVMe) SSD  change anything regarding booting?
AFAIK there are only two types of M.2 drives. PCIe NVMe and SATA

2) Would a NVM SSD be at least recognized by my W10 so that I could save to it (even if not bootable)?  I can't say that I or Google have ever heard of an NVM M.2 SSD. The one that the Ozzy on the video is using is an NVMe.

3). Why does this individual (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ew3F-5bgkS4 ) think that changing the BIOS to IDE (instead of SATA) believe that using a NVM drive in this configuration would make the drive bootable? Is he completely mistaken?   I find what he says he has done hard to believe. IDE is way back in the past generations of legacy hard drives. I can believe that using a SATA M.2 SSD in a  PCIe to SATA M.2 adapter would probably work with the BIOS in SATA emulation mode. I personally would not put my $$ into an nvme M.2 ssd just to try it in an adapter with a legacy BIOS. I have never seen a PCIe to M.2 adapter like his. I own two  PCIe to SATA M.2 adapters and they plug right into a PCIe x4 slot without any cable.

Again, so very sorry to bother you, but you have really been a tremendous help which I greatly appreciate.

 

Here is some background  reading material on the types of M.2 SSD product technology.

https://www.kingston.com/en/community/articledetail/articleid/48543


You're welcome! 
I am here to help.

View solution in original post

3 REPLIES 3
HP Recommended

"but I remain unsure as to whether I will be able to boot to this drive because my current BIOS 3.61 does not seem to have a way of recognizing/changing it to UEFI."

 

Yes.

The brick wall you have run into in regard to your booting is twofold. The first wall is the legacy BIOS and secondly, the PCIe NVMe SSD in the adapter, which the said legacy BIOS will not be able to recognize.

 

  There is no way around it with a older generation PC like the one you are using.

HP Recommended

Erico,

 

Thanks so much for the prompt reply! Not the answer I was hoping for, but you confirmed my suspicion. If I could bother you a little more:

1) Would, with a NVM (not a NVMe) SSD  change anything regarding booting?

2) Would a NVM SSD be at least recognized by my W10 so that I could save to it (even if not bootable)?

3). Why does this individual (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ew3F-5bgkS4 ) think that changing the BIOS to IDE (instead of SATA) believe that using a NVM drive in this configuration would make the drive bootable? Is he completely mistaken?

Again, so very sorry to bother you, but you have really been a tremendous help which I greatly appreciate.

HP Recommended

@Scholiast wrote:

Erico,

 

Thanks so much for the prompt reply! Not the answer I was hoping for, but you confirmed my suspicion. If I could bother you a little more:

1) Would, with a NVM (not a NVMe) SSD  change anything regarding booting?
AFAIK there are only two types of M.2 drives. PCIe NVMe and SATA

2) Would a NVM SSD be at least recognized by my W10 so that I could save to it (even if not bootable)?  I can't say that I or Google have ever heard of an NVM M.2 SSD. The one that the Ozzy on the video is using is an NVMe.

3). Why does this individual (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ew3F-5bgkS4 ) think that changing the BIOS to IDE (instead of SATA) believe that using a NVM drive in this configuration would make the drive bootable? Is he completely mistaken?   I find what he says he has done hard to believe. IDE is way back in the past generations of legacy hard drives. I can believe that using a SATA M.2 SSD in a  PCIe to SATA M.2 adapter would probably work with the BIOS in SATA emulation mode. I personally would not put my $$ into an nvme M.2 ssd just to try it in an adapter with a legacy BIOS. I have never seen a PCIe to M.2 adapter like his. I own two  PCIe to SATA M.2 adapters and they plug right into a PCIe x4 slot without any cable.

Again, so very sorry to bother you, but you have really been a tremendous help which I greatly appreciate.

 

Here is some background  reading material on the types of M.2 SSD product technology.

https://www.kingston.com/en/community/articledetail/articleid/48543


You're welcome! 
I am here to help.

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