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JBH50
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How do I reactivate Rapide Storage Technology after a SSD failure

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Envy Phoenix 810-250se
Microsoft Windows 10 (64-bit)

My system came with Intl's Rapid Storage Technology installed and running in 2014.  I upgraded to Win 10 Pro 64bit when it came out.  All was well until the original 16GB SSD failed.  Since RST is a pseudo-hybrid drive the HDD continued operating.  I replaced the 16GB with a 120GB.  After the reboot I saw no improvement in my power up times.  When I searched for the RST app in File Manager I found it in the 32bit(Why?) Program Files/Intel folder.  After doing the web and YouTube searches and watching videos on how to configure the BIOS drive configuration for RAID, I got curious.  I finally went to the RST folder and opened the ReadMe file and read it.  First I found out how to check to see if I was still in RAID configuration - I am.  Then I noticed the version I have, 14.5.0.1000 is from 8/28/2013, and it states that it is configured for OS's up to Win 8.1.  RST was operating after the OS upgrade.  I've looked through the HP website and can't find a driver name or specs that target my upgrade from 8.1 to 10.  Why isn't the RST detecting the new drive and powering up "rapidly"  So, what I do?  Do I ignore the warning from the ReadMe file and run the .exe, or what?

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Grzwacz
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Greetings,

Welcome to the forum.

I am not a HP employee.

 

Your problem is somewhat complex  to solve. Your PC shipped with a 16 GB SSD cache drive. Then HP offered various sized HDD or SATA SSD storage options at purchase.

 

The operating system (OS) is on the SATA HDD drive you chose at purchase. A platter HDD will be very slow. The 16 GB cache drive is used to enhance system performance. HP was using Condusiv Express Cache software for this purpose. This software will not work with SSDs having more than 16 GB capacity.

 

The best fix for your PC would be to eliminate the cache drive. Use a larger SATA SSD (512GB or 1TB) as the operating system boot drive. You could use the 120GB drive but it will fill up very fast. The second HDD can be used as a data drive.

 

This means you should either: copy the existing operating system only on the existing HDD to the new SATA SSD, or back up data and do a clean OS install on a new, larger SSD. You will have to move data off of the existing HDD if the volume is greater than the capacity of the new SSD if you decide to copy, clone the HDD image to the SSD.

 

 

There is no need to have a caching drive when the OS is installed on a fast SATA SSD.

 

Regards

 

 

 

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JBH50
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Dear GRZWACZ;

 

Thank you for both your timely response and concise education.  I am very disappointed that HP has not updated their Condusiv Express Cache software to allow the use of a SSD larger than 16GB.  Considering the death of the cache drive was brought on by the excessive read/writes over the years.  The reason for my attachment to the pseudo-hybrid drive cache configuration is the inherent RAID mirroring safety.  The cache allowed SSD speed, which your solution would provide, but when it failed I was able to continue working without pause, which the failure of the boot SSD (or HDD) would not.  Especially since SSD's tend to die without warning.

 

Would HP's Win10 object if I were to use Intel's RST app directly to set up a cache device larger than 16GB?  Also, would RST allow for a cache device 120GB?  I have evidence that a RST software Main Menu screen shot of a cache disk of 32 (29.0)GB.

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Grzwacz
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Hi,

 

Caching drives up to 32 GB such as Intel's newer Optane configuration are used to enhance system performance when using a slow platter HDD.

 

You don't need this if you install a larger SATA SSD as the operating system drive.

 

I am running SATA SSDs that are four plus years old. Still working great.

 

Regards

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JBH50
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I have to update my earlier statement concerning my replacement SSD.  I didn't install a 120GB SSD instead I replaced the 16GB with a 64GB SSD.  Which I found is the maximum drive that Intel's Rapid Storage Technology is supposed to accommodate.  So my question concerning Intel's RST remains.  Can I substitute HP's RST drivers for the other driver you identified as controlling the app and data caching?  Do you have any idea of the process that will be able to successfully do this?

 

In response to this post, I am unable to take advantage of Optane technology with my ancient model CPU. 

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Grzwacz
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Hi,

 

Your PC's motherboard does not support Optane.

 

Just do a larger SATA SSD. This setup will work great and be as reliable as a disk caching setup.

 

The cache drive (Optane or Condusiv) is a SSD drive. SSDs are reliable.

 

Stop obsessing on RAID. Use AHCI BIOS setting with a SSD boot drive and a HDD data drive.

 

Regards

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JBH50
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Can you help me wit the more important question?  I'm trying to get RST to work to provide the security against drive failure.  Otherwise, my only alternative will be constant image clones of the boot drive to avoid the hours of reinstallation of the OS and programs, and, lamentations over lost internet favorites, music and pictures (I hate the cloud).  HP has a RST driver I already have downloaded it and have double clicked it, gave it permission to change the CPU and nothing has happened.  Now What?

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