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HP Recommended
HP 250 G8
Microsoft Windows 10 (64-bit)

Hello HP support!

I'm having a problem with my laptop (HP 250 G8).

When I connect to WiFi (Aruba AP11) on 5 Ghz I can't get bandwidth over 112 Mbps.

When I go to my Wireless adapter and click status, it shows that my connection speed is 866 Mbps.

I tried various tests (iperf3, moving large zip archives, movies etc.) and all tests have same result - aroung 112 Mbps.

There are no limits on WiFi router, or on my network (every device is connected via gigabit ethernet with gigabit switches).

Windows version: 21H1 (OS Build 19043.1348)

All drivers are newest avaliable (I regularly update Windows)

 

WiFi adapter Power Management is turned off.

Advanced WiFi settings from device manager:

- 802.11d - Enabled

- 802.11n channel width for 2.4 Ghz - Auto

- 802.11n channel width for 5.2 Ghz - Auto

- ARP offload for WoWLAN - Enabled

- Beacon interval - 100

- Fat Channel Intolerarnt - Disabled

- GTK rekeying for WoWLAN - Enabled

- HT mode - VHT mode

- Mixed mode protection - CST-to-self - Enabled

- Multi-Channel Concurrent - Enabled + Hotspot

- NS offload for WoWLAN - Enabled

- Preamble Mode - Short & Long

- Preferred Band - 3. 5G first

- Roaming Aggressiveness - 4.Medium

- Sleep on WoWLAN dissconnect - Disabled

- Transmit power - 5. Highest

- Wake on Magic Packet - Enabled

- Wake on Pattern Match - Enabled

- Wireless mode - 6. 802.11a/b/g

7 REPLIES 7
HP Recommended

@Nikola_LJ -- I can't get bandwidth over 112 Mbps

 

That speed is double the speed of most "Wireless G" WiFi adapters.

There was one late addition to "Wireless G" to double the speed, namely to 112 Mbps.

 

To what WiFi-capable router is your computer connecting? 

Older WiFi routers do not use the much-faster "Wireless N" or "Wireless AC" protocols.

 

HP Recommended

I'm using Aruba AP11 Access Point as router. See my network diagram below:Network diagramNetwork diagram

All cables are SFTP cat7. I already tested my network on all cable connections, and every test I did gave me same result (Gigabit like it should be).

 

Below is my WiFi status. Notice how it shows that connection speed is 866 Mbps. No matter how I test my WiFi network (I used iperf, transfered large files Laptop to Laptop...) I always get same result (around 112 Mbps).

WiFi StatusWiFi Status

If you need any additional information to solve my problem please let me know.

Also, is tere a test that I should do and post results here?

HP Recommended

@Nikola_LJ -- transferred large files Laptop to Laptop... I always get same result (around 112 Mbps).

 

Have you tried using a site like www.SpeedTest.net to see what speed each laptop can attain, independently?

Hint: open the Windows Task Manager, and switch to the "Performance" tab.

Minimize this window, and then launch the Speed Test.

Restore that T.M. window, and see if the CPU hits 100% busy (it probably will, if its CPU is less than 2.5 Ghz) and what rate the WiFi/wired connection is instantaneously getting.

 

Are the two laptops connected (wired/WiFi) to the same router/switch ?

 

Are you configuring the two laptops to be one FTP-client, and one FTP-server, with FTP as the File Transfer Protocol, or are you using Windows Networking (sharing a folder on one computer, and accessing that "share" on the other) ?

 

HP Recommended

I tried to use speedtest.net and I get results around 400 Mbps. But that is my internet speed at the location, and it can't get more than that. I don't have fast internet here, because I don't need it. What I need is fast connection between computers.

When I use speedtest.net my Task Manager shows that CPU is at 50% busy, and WiFi adapter shows speeds that I'm measuring at speedtest.net.

 

I tried various connection methods:

- Laptop1 on WiFi, Laptop2 on WiFi;

- Laptop1 on cable, Laptop2 on WiFi;

- Laptop1 on WiFi, Laptop2 on cable

- Laptop1 on cable, Laptop2 on cable;

Only when I do the test with both laptops on cable connections I get 1 Gbps, all other test are around 112 Mbps.

 

I tried connecting them to same swithc, or same Access Point, and it gets me same results as when I do the test when laptops are connected to different swithces or Access Points.

 

When I do the test with iperf3, I set one laptop to be server, and another to be client.

I also tried to share folder from one laptop to another, and then test connection speed.

No matter what test I do results are the same, 112 MBps.

 

I'm sure that I can't get exactly 866 Mbps like it's written on my WiFi adapter status, but I'm limited to 1/8 of the speed that I should be getting.

 

If you want I can try any test that you want, and post results here. I'm really desperate to get this to work properly.

HP Recommended

@Nikola_LJ -- that "866" is the current speed between either laptop and the Access Point.

If your Internet can only give you "400", then your laptop's network-connection will only 400/866 "busy".

For the remaining (866-400)/866 of the time, your WiFi connection will be idle -- waiting for the Internet to send more data to your Access Point.

 

> when I do the test with both laptops on cable connections I get 1 Gbps, all other test are around 112 Mbps.

 

The "wired" network-adapters inside each laptop can communicate at 10 or 100 or 1000 Mbits/second to the Access Point, and through the Access Point from one laptop to the other laptop.

 

I wonder if the WiFi adapter inside Access Point is "busy" -- receiving at 866 Mbps from one laptop, while simultaneously trying to send at 866 Mbps to the other laptop.  [Most people can "juggle" one ball, but it takes some practice to be able to juggle two balls.]  The Access Point may be at the "I cannot keep up" point when trying to work with both streams.

 

What speed do you get with one laptop on WiFi, and the other one "wired" ?

 

HP Recommended

When I do the test with one laptop wired i get slightly better results (170-180Mbps), but that's still not even close to 400 Mbps.

 

Access point is "busy" around 10%-15% while I do these tests.

Also, it's important to mention, I did these test like this:

- Both laptops connected to same Access Point

- Each laptop connected to different Access Point

- One laptop on cable and other on Access Point

 

Whatever I do I can't get speeds that I should be getting.

 

I'm also doing these tests when I'm literally sitting next to router, without any obstacles.

HP Recommended

@Nikola_LJ -- When I do the test with one laptop wired i get slightly better results (170-180Mbps), but that's still not even close to 400 Mbps.

 

Open the Windows Task Manager before running that test, and select its "Performance" tab.

Check to confirm that there is almost no network-activity on the "wired" Ethernet connection, and almost no CPU activity.

Minimize this window.

Check that your WiFi adapter has been disabled, to force your computer's Ethernet adapter to do all the work. 

Launch the Speed Test, and immediately restore the Task Manager window.

 

I am thinking that your CPU will now be showing 100% busy, implying that your CPU is too slow to run the Speed Test at its maximum rate.  So, your CPU is a "bottleneck", resulting in lower-than-400 speed.

Almost every computer with a CPU operating at less than 2.4 Ghz will show this "bottle-neck".

 

Compare the speeds reported by your adapters, such as "866", with the actual volume of the traffic.

Think of a major arterial-road between the downtown of a city and a major suburb.

During "rush hour", the posted speed-limit might be 60 Kph, but the bumper-to-bumper traffic could be about 10 Kph.

 

Each of your Internets "packet" will move at "866", between your router and your computer, but only at 400 between your router and the Shaw network. 

 

If there are only 8 packets per second, resulting in an actual "load" of 108.25 Mbps. So, your Internet packets are not end-to-end, like a railroad train, but are widely spaced apart (like driving a highway after midnight).

 

† The opinions expressed above are the personal opinions of the authors, not of HP. By using this site, you accept the <a href="https://www8.hp.com/us/en/terms-of-use.html" class="udrlinesmall">Terms of Use</a> and <a href="/t5/custom/page/page-id/hp.rulespage" class="udrlinesmall"> Rules of Participation</a>.