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CoreyCutler
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System Service Exception / Bad Pool Header

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Spectre360
Microsoft Windows 10 (32-bit)

I am getting a recurrent Blue Screen of Death error - usually System_Service_Exception but sometimes Bad_Pool_Header.  Sometimes in addition, a message says : What Failed? Win32kbase.sys.

 

I have sent the machine in to HP TWICE, and the BIOS was reset to factory once, but it is happening again.  It happens several time PER HOUR at this point. 

 

Please help.

 

Corey

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mdklassen
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First thing to do is to reboot your HP computer, and launch the HP Diagnostics, and do the test of the RAM.

 

Bad RAM is liking using chalk to write on a greasy chalkboard -- sometimes, you cannot read what you have written, and that causes "misinformation", and the Operating System to do "unpredictable" things, like error-messages.

 

 

 

CoreyCutler
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Thank you for your suggestion -

 

I have done this multiple times, running quick and long checks of the systems, but will gladly run this again.

 

What would you suggest as the next step assuming the RAM is OK?

 

C

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mdklassen
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> What would you suggest as the next step assuming the RAM is OK?

 

I presume that the disk-drive has passed all the tests, i.e., there are no "hardware" issues with your system.

 

If it were my computer, I would purchase a brand-new disk-drive, connect it to my computer as a "slave" disk-drive, and use "disk-cloning" software to copy 100% of the sectors from "old" to "new".  If the "cloning" fails, due to having some "unreadable" sectors, then this will have identified a problem with the "old" disk-drive.

 

At this point, I would open an "administrative-level" command-line window, and enter:  CHKDSK C: /R

to have "check-disk" identify any bad sectors.  Often, a "modern" disk-drive has its own "spare" sectors,

and CHKDSK would force the disk-drive to "swap-out" the bad sectors, and "swap-in" some of those "spare" sectors.

CHKDSK will tell you to reboot, to allow CHKDSK to run during the reboot process.

 

Then, if necessary, I would disconnect the Ethernet cable from the Internet, and reinstall Windows onto the "new" disk-drive.

Test the computer (without an Internet connection), to see if the problem persists.

Reconnect to the Internet, and run Windows Update, and re-test. 

If it "passes", then reconnect the original disk-drive as a "slave" drive-letter, and copy all the personal files from "old" to "new".

 

Of course, I'm the type of person who does not trust "out-of-warranty" disk-drives, and will replace seemingly good disk-drives before they unexpectedly fail.

 

 

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