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hamdidouss
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Unable to make Asus GTX 1060 Turbo work on my HP 3400 Pro

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HP 3400 Pro
Microsoft Windows 7 (64-bit)

Hello,

 

I bought a new Graphic Card (Asus GTX 1060 Turbo) along with a new PSU (that have a 6 pin PCI cord). I am unable to make it work with my HP 3400. This is what I tried so far:

*Remove any  Nvidia graphic card and connect a monitor to the onboard graphic card : all works fine

*install GTX1060, connect monitor to card DVI port (with or without monitor connected to onboard graphic card) : insanely slow boot with beeps that ends with a windows start with a glitched unusable display (nothing is distinguishable)

*install GTX1060, connect monitor to card HDMI port (with or without monitor connected to onboard graphic card) : No display at all.

*install GTX1060, no monitor connected to card,  a monitor is connected to onboard graphic card : No display at all, long beeps and no boot.

 

My bios version is American Megatrends 7.16 (the latest upgrade suggested by HP website for HP 3400/Win7). I have no option in the bios that let me boot on (or enable) the onboard graphic card when another card is installed. That could help me at least to get into Windows and install the GTX1060 drivers for Windows.

 

Thanks in advance.

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TheOldMan
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What you are describing is typical for a non-compatible graphics card.   Also, the onboard graphics are disabled when a graphics card is inserted.  What has been the information about this is the BIOS and motherboard are not compatible with that type card.  A card that will support legacy BIOS or a switchable selector for that type support is needed.  If going forward, investigate that feature as well as a good return policy.


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erico
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The GTX 1060 isn't working in your desktop PC simply because your PC does not support video cards that do not have legacy BIOS ( that is what your PC has).

 

The GTX series of video cards have only  UEFI BIOS support. UEFI BIOS is only in newer desktop PCs and notebooks. 

 

If you want a card as powerful as a GTX 1060 or 1070 you will need to look at the AMD Radeon r9 series of PCIe x16 video cards.

 

Always check the specs to ensure that legacy BIOS is supported. Some manufacturers produce and sell cards that support both or just one BIOS type.

 

For an example,  take a look at the following Sapphiretechnology manufacturer's specifications image. http://www.sapphiretech.com/productdetial.asp?pid=F107EA58-6C33-4F74-A739-03FF852D34A1&lang=eng

 

Radeonr9.png




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hamdidouss
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Thanks for your reply.

If I press "Escape" I have an option to "launch UEFI". When selected, I just can browse on my drives (HDD or USB).

Can I setup a UEFI Bios on my PC? How to do it ?

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erico
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OK.

 

In that case, turning off secure boot may allow the card to be seen as being present by the BIOS.

 

It is very important to check and see if your system is setup with the boot drives in GPT format first.

 

Boot up as normal and then launch a command line window.

 

Typen in Diskpart and press enter to invoke the diskpart utility.

 

list volume

and then type in list disk.

 

If the boot drive is in GPT format you will see an asterisk below the Gpt column.

 

Type exit to exit the diskpart utiilty.

 

See the following image from the desktop I am typing this on. I am using Powershell on this desktop, but it involves invoking the same commands as in the command line would.

 

 

diskpart.png

 

 

 

 

 

 




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hamdidouss
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My boot drive does not have this asterisk under the GPT column (only a second HD has).

What happens if I disable secure boot ? How could I disable secure boot ?

Other thing :

I managed to enter bios config with the GTX installed and I enabled onboard graphic card.  Now Windows boots with the onboard GC (GTX 1060 installed on Motherboard) but does not detect the GTX1060. Maybe the bios enable one card (onboard) or the other (GTX1060).

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hamdidouss
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Windows was detecting a VGA compatible device. I installed drivers for this device. Then I restarted and disabled onboard card from BIOS.

Now I still have an insanely slow start from BIOS but aftrewards Windows starts normally and I don't see glitchy screen anymore. Windows still complain (in device manager) with "Windows stopped this device because it reported problems (code 43)". I am continuing investigating...

I sum up steps I done for further readers essentially:

 

1. Install new Graphic card, 1 monitor connected to onboard GC and 1 monitor conencted to GTX1060

2. Turn on PC, keep pressing 'ESC' until I got BIOS menu, enter BIOS config and enable onboard GC, restart -> This step is not easy as this boot is very very slow

3. On Windows, go to device manager, look for a VGA compatible device with a "yellow warning" icon, install drivers for this device from (with GTX1060) shipped CD/DVD, you may have a setup.exe, that you should extract (or self-extract) to get drivers files.

4. Restart, enter BIOS config, and disable onboard GC (you may disconnect any monitor connected to onboard GC).

 

Only problems I have now :

1.The boot is really really slow, at least until I get to the "Starting Windows" screen

2.Windows keeps showing yellow warning icon with GTX1060 in device manager telling the device is stopped (even if all seems OK)

 

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erico
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Your desktop PC's BIOS will disable the onboard graphics when a video card is installed. That is an HP standard.




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hamdidouss
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Yes that's what I understood. But when I activate onboard GC in BIOS (with GTX1060 installed in motherboard), I have the two monitors (i.e:two cards) displaying and working for some seconds(at least until the start of Windows).

For now, my GTX1060 is not really working, I only have a "normal" display in Windows, but nothing really works on the potential of the GTX. I am trying to use DDU to uninstall any other NVIDIA drivers and redo the steps (I had a GT520 installed before).

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erico
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What do the acronyms you are using mean?  Please use words instead.  

 

I have a dictionary of acronyms in my head, but many are from military aviation electronics and do not mean what you are attempting to say.

 

Have you tried installing the appropriate driver software package from GeForce?

http://www.geforce.com/drivers




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