cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 
ArchivedThis topic has been archived. Information and links in this thread may no longer be available or relevant. If you have a question create a new topic by clicking here and select the appropriate board.
JohnB591
New member
6 5 0 0
Message 1 of 14
486
Flag Post

getting messages about imminent disk failure

HP Recommended
BT473AA-ABA CQ5404F
Microsoft Windows 7 (64-bit)

Error Message : imminent disk failure WDC WD50 00AAKS-60Z1A  SCSI Disk device

0 Kudos
13 REPLIES 13
erico
Level 17
Level 17
47,953 42,193 4,643 12,405
Message 2 of 14
Flag Post
HP Recommended

That is a good reason to try to save whatever data you can from the disk.

 

Imminent means that it is going to fail. Don't wait and let it surprise you..

 

Replace it with a new one, perhaps even upgrade to an SSD and reinstall the operating system




I am not an HP Employee.
JohnB591
Author
New member
6 5 0 0
Message 3 of 14
Flag Post
HP Recommended

Thanks! I did a complete backup (11 DVDs and 1 DVD 'system repair'). As a newby: 1. can I install an SSD all by myself? and/or 2. Can I get an external SSD and use a USB port? in which case 3. do I have to remove the 'bad' disk drive? This is an old - by today's - desktop.

Thanks, again

JohnB591

0 Kudos
mdklassen
Level 12
11,043 11,017 577 1,689
Message 4 of 14
Flag Post
HP Recommended

> As a newbie: 1. can I install an SSD all by myself?

 

Yes.  A "normal" desktop disk-drive is 3.5-inches wide, while an SSD typically is only 2.0 or 2.5 inches wide.

So, you might have to do something to "hold" the SSD in-place.  But, since it is SSD, it can be somewhat "loosely" attached.

 

If your current disk-drive is the current 'SATA' interface, not the much-older 'IDE' interface, you should be able disconnect "data" and "power" cables from the current drive, remove the drive, and connect the new SSD.

 

> Can I get an external SSD and use a USB port?

 

A major point is that the SSD, connected "inside" a computer should be capable of data-transfers up to 6.0 Gbit/second, while an "external" (USB) connection could extremely limit the speed.

 

> do I have to remove the 'bad' disk drive?

 

No.  As long as it does not receive any electrical power, it can stay where it is.

 

Note that some SSD devices come with "disk-cloning" software.

It will copy everything, byte-for-byte, from the "old" disk-drive to the SSD device,

even adjusting for different capacities of the two devices, by "shrinking" a partition, if necessary.

This is the quickest way to make a WORKING copy of your current drive, for a fast "swap" (like changing an automobile tire).

 

JohnB591
Author
New member
6 5 0 0
Message 5 of 14
Flag Post
HP Recommended

Thanks. I have no idea what type ('SATA' or 'IDE') the 500GB HD is in this 2010 Presario. I'm pretty sure that the USBs are 2,0. I'm using - and like very much - Winsows 7 64bit.  I don't do videos, gaming, or music so download speed doesn't mean much to me. I do like the idea of an external drive just so I don't have to dive inside the big black box and so I could use it on my laptop if needs be.

Just like changing to softer compound tires, I'm going to have to think about this.

Many thanks

John

0 Kudos
mdklassen
Level 12
11,043 11,017 577 1,689
Message 6 of 14
Flag Post
HP Recommended

> Thanks. I have no idea what type ('SATA' or 'IDE') the 500GB HD is in this 2010 Presario.

 

The largest IDE drive ever made was 500 GB.

The smallest SATA drive ever made was about 80 GB.

So, the capacity of the hard-drive is no help in answering your question.

 

Take a look at the "back" of the disk-drive.  If there is a "flat" ribbon-cable, about two inches wide, your drive is IDE.

Or, if you have a narrow (1/4-inch wide) cable (probably RED or BLACK), your drive is SATA.

 

> I'm pretty sure that the USBs are 2.0. I'm using - and like very much - Windows 7 64bit. 

 

A SSD drive is capable of 6000 megabits (6 gigabits) per second.

 

The now-aging USB 2.0 standard can theoretically transfer data at a very high 480 megabits per second (mbps), or 60 megabytes per second (MBps). That's impressive, but not as much as the newer USB 3.0, which can handle up to 5gbps (640MBps)—over ten times as fast as the 2.0 maximum.

 

> I don't do videos, gaming, or music so download speed doesn't mean much to me.

 

The disk-drive communicates with the motherboard at either 1.5 or 3.0 or 6.0 Gigabits/second.

This is independent of your "download" speeds over the Internet.

 

> I do like the idea of an external drive just so I don't have to dive inside the big black box and so I could use it on my laptop if needs be.

 

Yes, you need to replace the (failing) disk-drive inside your "desktop" computer with another "spinning" disk-drive, and also you may purchase an "external" disk-drive that can be plugged-in to any computer.

 

> I need to think about this.

 

Don't procrastinate -- your "internal" disk-drive is failing, like a bald automobile tire, and needs to be replaced before it completely/unexpectedly "blows-out".

 

Buy a new "internal" disk-drive from SEAGATE or WESTERN DIGITAL.

Then, from their respective web-sites, download their free "disk-cloning" software.

Run it, to copy, byte-by-byte, from "old" to "new".

Disconnect "old". Connect "new".

Reboot, and resume normal operation.

 

 

 

erico
Level 17
Level 17
47,953 42,193 4,643 12,405
Message 7 of 14
Flag Post
HP Recommended

Unfortunately, using an external disk will make your older PC seriously slow, even to the point where you may even truly dislike it. 

 

Your desktop PC may not even boot from an external disk.

 

You can have the new legacy or SSD disk installed at a PC store for not much money.

 

Those are some things to consider. 

 

I will edit this after I have had the time to see the specifications on your PC.

 

OK. Your desktop PC uses SATA hard disks.  




I am not an HP Employee.
mdklassen
Level 12
11,043 11,017 577 1,689
Message 8 of 14
Flag Post
HP Recommended

> I will edit this after I have had the time to see the specifications on your PC.

 

I will save you the time.  Here they are:  http://support.hp.com/hk-en/document/c02481305

 

Figure : Hard drive Image of hard drive

  • Size: 500 GB
  • Interface: SATA
  • Rotational Speed: 7200 RPM

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

JohnB591
Author
New member
6 5 0 0
Message 9 of 14
Flag Post
HP Recommended

OK, eh.

I opened the desktop and found the hard drive (black, about 3,5" x 4,25" x 0,5") and it had two connections: a. yellow/black/red/yellow wires into flat black connector and b. pale red 3/8 or so flat connector. So...SATA?

There seems to be an open shelf above the HD which should fit the new internal unit. I'll give up on the external SSD idea.

I've backed up everything on DVDs.

For ca US$76 I can replace the HDD with a Seagate Desktop 2TB 3.5-Inch HDD SATA 6Gb/s 64MB Cache Internal Bare Drive (ST2000DM001).

For ca US$90 I can replace the HDD with a SanDisk SSD PLUS 240GB Solid State Drive (SDSSDA-240G-G26) [Newest Version] and a 3,5" to 2,5" adapter.

I appreciate the Seagate/WD nod but they are close to US$300 and this is a 7 year-old computer.

Thanks again to all.

john

0 Kudos
mdklassen
Level 12
11,043 11,017 577 1,689
Message 10 of 14
Flag Post
HP Recommended

> I opened the desktop and found the hard drive (black, about 3,5" x 4,25" x 0,5") and it had two connections:

> a. yellow/black/red/yellow wires into flat black connector and

> b. pale red 3/8 or so flat connector. So...SATA?

 

Definitely SATA power and SATA "data".

 

> For ca US$76 I can replace the HDD with a Seagate Desktop 2TB 3.5-Inch HDD SATA 6Gb/s 64MB Cache Internal Bare Drive (ST2000DM001).

 

That is a 2 TeraByte  "spinning" disk-drive, not a SSD device.

 

> For ca US$90 I can replace the HDD with a SanDisk SSD PLUS 240GB Solid State Drive (SDSSDA-240G-G26) [Newest Version] and a 3,5" to 2,5" adapter.

 

That is smaller capacity (versus the 2TB disk-drive, above) SSD drive. 

 

How much "capacity" do you need?  By itself, Windows 10 takes more than 30 GB.

Add a copy of Micorosft Office, and other software (Audacity, TheGimp, anti-virus),

and 60 GB is "bare minimum".

 

Buying 240GB will leave you with 180GB for your "data".

 

> I appreciate the Seagate/WD nod but they are close to US$300

 

Really? You must have been looking at "big-capacity" SSD devices.  Those prices are out-of-line for "spinning" drives.

For $80 US, see: http://www.bestbuy.com/site/seagate-2tb-internal-serial-ata-hard-drive-for-desktops-multi/4919412.p?...

for 2TB "spinning" disk-drive from SEAGATE.

 

 

 

ArchivedThis topic has been archived. Information and links in this thread may no longer be available or relevant. If you have a question create a new topic by clicking here and select the appropriate board.
† The opinions expressed above are the personal opinions of the authors, not of HP. By using this site, you accept the Terms of Use and Rules of Participation