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HP Recommended
OMEN 30L Desktop GT13-0xxx
Microsoft Windows 10 (64-bit)

Got a brand new HP Omen desktop last week, but I'm not sure it's working properly.

I9 10900K, 32 Gb, 2x 1 Tb SSD, 2080 RTX Ti

Despite high temperatures (50 C at idle, going up to 95+ ) the overal performance looked great.

To reduce temperatures while gaming I have limited the max-framerate (which annoys me a lot, because that's not why I bought a high end PC).

So just looking for usefull tweaks I took a chance on overclocking with the Omen Command Center.

Standard benchmark (no oc) is at 2630. Took a first run on the 'intelligent overclocking'... result is 2614.

Not sure what this means... is this simply 'not so intellligent' or does it imply some malfunctioning ?

 

1 ACCEPTED SOLUTION

Accepted Solutions
HP Recommended

Hello @fro1 

 

My personal advice is to not use the Intelligent OverClocking tool, but use Custom instead. The OCC has been known to have glitches and IOC has not been stable for everyone. I would start with small increments with the Core Multiplier until you reach past its stable ability. Then dial it back to the stable setting.

Run a bench mark for each setting.

 

For example my older setup with an 8700k would run stable at a core multiplier of 47 custom, 43 default. Each system will be different. I found for me, core voltage offset did not help and I wouldn't recommend using it anyway.

 

Not sure that's the answer you wanted, but hope it helps.

View solution in original post

1 REPLY 1
HP Recommended

Hello @fro1 

 

My personal advice is to not use the Intelligent OverClocking tool, but use Custom instead. The OCC has been known to have glitches and IOC has not been stable for everyone. I would start with small increments with the Core Multiplier until you reach past its stable ability. Then dial it back to the stable setting.

Run a bench mark for each setting.

 

For example my older setup with an 8700k would run stable at a core multiplier of 47 custom, 43 default. Each system will be different. I found for me, core voltage offset did not help and I wouldn't recommend using it anyway.

 

Not sure that's the answer you wanted, but hope it helps.

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