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get error cpu fan not detected F1 boot ..but fan running fine

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Hello

I am having the same issue. I have updated my BIOS and I have cleaned out my PC entirely. My fan is not spinning when I start it up, but after about 1-3 minutes it starts spinning with a fast speed making a lot of noise. It then slows down after 5-30 seconds, spinning a more normal speed and then it stops spinning completely again. This sometimes repeats over time. I don't really see how getting a new fan would help, as it still does spin and the fan itself isn't broken.
PC: Hp Pavilion 500-301nd Desktop PC

Current BIOS: ROM Family SSID 2B17

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@Yurivdb

Welcome to the HP Forums,

We'll be with you until it's all sorted.

 

You have a good point about the new fan, however, sometimes the fan may be malfunctioning and causing such issues and replacement of the same could be the best thing for your computer, besides these fans are system managed and we can't do much on changing how they work, that said, here's what you can try doing before initiating a replacement for the same:

 

Have you cleaned the interiors of your device to resolve the issue?

If not, here's where we need to start:

 

Dust buildup around exterior vents and internal components can clog air passages that keep in heat and cause computer issues.

  1. Turn off the computer, then unplug all cables from the computer, noting the location of each cable for later reconnections.

  2. Remove the computer side panel by unscrewing the retaining screws or releasing the latches on the rear of the PC, and then slide the panel off.

Figure: Remove the side panel from the case

  1. Clean any dust from the vent holes. Use a small vacuum cleaner, if available.

Figure: Examples of vents on desktop computers

  1. Use canned air to blow any dust off any parts inside the computer, especially around fans and the power supply.

Figure: Examples of areas inside the computer where dust can accumulate

  1. Replace the side panel, reconnect all cables, then turn on the computer to confirm that the issue is resolved.

Check the fan inside the desktop computer for connection issues or obstructions.

  1. Unplug all cables from the computer exterior, noting the location of each cable for later reconnections.

  2. Remove the computer side panel by unscrewing the retaining screws or releasing the latches on the rear of the PC, and then slide the panel off.

Figure: Remove the side panel from the case

  1. Look for the fans near vents, around the processor, and around the video card. Most desktops have a CPU fan, a rear chassis fan, and a power supply fan. Some devices may only have a CPU fan or only a chassis fan.

Figure: Common fan locations inside an HP desktop computer

  1. Make sure the fan power cables are connected firmly to the motherboard.

Figure: Check the fan power cable connection

  1. Check for any objects that might stop the fan from spinning, then gently spin the fan with your fingers to make sure the fan is not stuck.

  2. With the side panel still removed, connect the power cable, turn on the computer, and check if the fans are working correctly.

WARNING: Make sure nothing enters the computer case while it is turned on. Do not perform this step while children or pets are nearby.

  • If any fans are not spinning or are making a loud noise, replace the fan. Fan replacement instructions may exist for your computer model. Search HP Customer Support for “[computer model number] replace the fan.”

  • If the fans are spinning and are not making noise, press the power button on the front of the computer for 5 seconds to turn it off, replace the side panel, reconnect all cables, then turn on the computer to confirm that the issue is resolved.

If the issue persists, please update the BIOS: Click here for details

 

Let me know how that pans out

I will have a colleague follow-up on this to ensure it's taken care off, in case you don't respond in the next 24-48hrs,

As I need to know if the issue has been resolved, to get proper sleep at night.

Feel free to give me a virtual high-five by clicking the 'Thumbs Up' icon,

Followed by clicking on 'Accepted as Solution' as it would help the community gain more knowledge and have a great day Ahead!

Riddle_Decipher
I am an HP Employee

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> My fan is not spinning when I start it up, but after about 1-3 minutes it starts spinning with a fast speed making a lot of noise. It then slows down after 5-30 seconds, spinning a more normal speed and then it stops spinning completely again. This sometimes repeats over time. 

 

This could be "normal" operation.

At power-on, the fan spins, and the POST (Power On Self Test) measures the temperature of the processor and the motherboard. If the computer is literally "cool", the motherboard tells the fan to stop.

Later, after Windows boots, and Windows "calls home" to check for updates, the processor gets much warmer.  The motherboard tells the fan to "spin quickly".  After 5-30 seconds, the processor is much cooler, and the motherboard tells the fan to spin at a "normal" rate, or even to stop spinning.

 

You might try a different fan, but my guess is that you'll observations will be the same.

 

 

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(I have already done all the steps HP recommended me to do)
Even if it is normal behavior, I don't understand why it says 511-CPU Fan is not found.

 

My main problem was that my computer is running extremely slow, but I can't seem to figure out why. I checked all the steps on the HP forum, but everything should be fine. I have enough memory, my PC is cleaned, I deleted all unnecessary programs on my PC and I did an anti-virus scan. 

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> My main problem was that my computer is running extremely slow, but I can't seem to figure out why.

 

Open the Windows "Task Manager", and switch to the "Performance" tab.

What percentages does it show for CPU Usage and for Memory and for Networking?

Near the bottom of that "Performance" tab, click on "Resource Monitor".

It will give you much more detailed information about which tasks are using the processor,

and which programs are accessing which files.

 

Note that a "near-death" disk-drive can take 100 to 1000 times as long to do Input/Output, which will noticeably slow-down your computer.

 

 

 

 

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My CPU-Usage is sticking between 3-6%, while the bar on the right of that (my PC is in Dutch, so it might not be the exact translation), the ''..% of maximum frequency'' is hanging somewhere between 60-80%. Also, while doing nothing on my PC and just having the ''Resource Monitor'' tab opened, I saw the ''..% of maximum frequency'' suddenly jumped to 107% and stuck around there for quite a couple minutes. I myself don't really know if this is good or bad, or if I should do something to lower the maximum frequency bar.

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Within "Resource Monitor", select the "CPU" tab (near the top) and you can sort the rows to show the tasks which consume the largest percentage of CPU resources.

 

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Then my main problem is that I don't know which tasks I can end, because I assume if I end ''chrome.exe'', which is on the top, my internet browser would end. Also, I don't know which ones I can end without doing something to the PC I don't want to do.

My top ones are;
4x chrome.exe
perfmon.exe

System

svchost.net

**and one that's kind of strange to me**, ''Interrupts of the system''
I don't think I can end most of these, can I?

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@Yurivdb wrote:

My main problem is that I don't know which tasks I can end, because I assume if I end ''chrome.exe'', which is on the top, my internet browser would end.

Also, I don't know which ones I can end without doing something to the PC I don't want to do.

My top ones are;
4x chrome.exe
perfmon.exe

System

svchost.net

**and one that's kind of strange to me**, ''Interrupts of the system''
I don't think I can end most of these, can I?


 

Measure, measure, measure.

 

Ending tasks is like buying bananas, when you want to purchase only a certain weight of them.

Put a load of them into the weigh-scale, to deliberately exceed your desired weight.

Remove all the "unwanted" ones (too green? too ripe?), and then re-measure, to see if you've achieved your desired weight.

If you are now "under" your desired weight, restart the whole process, starting with more bananas in the load.

If you still are "over", then some of the "good" ones will have to be removed, or you will have to accept that you are "overweight".

 

Similarly, if your computer is running "slow", then you could have too many active processes.

End some "known" processes, one at at time, such as 'chrome.exe', and re-measure, to see if that change brings-down the "load" towards your target of a "faster" computer. 

Do not end the 'procman.exe' -- it's the one that is showing you the "scale".

If you try to end a "critical system" process, you will be warned.

If your do end such a process, the worst thing that will happen will be a "crash" of Windows.  If so, reboot, and start again.

If you have removed all that you can prudently remove, and your computer still is "slow", then the slowness is not caused by having too many processes.  You'll have to "look elsewhere", such as all of your RAM being consumed, by using the Process Monitor's capability of monitoring the usage of RAM, or by using P.M.'s capability of monitoring your network-usage, or by using P.M.'s capability of monitoring the "active" files.

 

Note that a "near-death" disk-drive can take 100 to 1000 times as long as normal to do Input/Output.

Such delays will produce a "slow" computer.

 

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