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HP Recommended

My computer hits 88c all the time and has even shut down from overheating. It's at the hp service center now and they basically said they cant help at all. So I have to find a way to upgrade the cooling somehow. Can I just throw a 92mm nautica fan on the back ? Also i hear the top has a bracket for a 120m maybe add one of those ? Or should I just take it to some shop and add liquid cooling? I am a little pissed that this brand new computer cant play games without me spending more money to fix it. Super poor design for the cooling. 

HP Recommended

Hi TheLamp,

 

A possible solution depends on what component or components is/are hitting 88 Celsius. You might need more airflow out of the chassis if the GPU is running at this temp. Most of the heat is being generated in a small area by the CPU, GPU, and the VRMs.

 

I would take it to a local, reputable PC tech, see what the tech thinks. Maybe go with an additional fan (or upgrade an existing fan) to improve chassis airflow and add a AIO CPU liquid cooling solution to reduce CPU temps.

 

Regards

HP Recommended

My rtx 2080 sees 88+C and has even shut off. It's a poor design. Nobody from hp will help either. So randomly upgrading fans I will go. 

HP Recommended

I know your not suggesting to lower the computers performance lol


@DGroves wrote:

Both HP and nvidia work together to make sure as system HP sells meets the required thermal cooling  nessary to keep the system and componiets within the rated temptures

 

while your video card is near the listed thermal limit while gameing, it does not exceed the 88c listed limit nvidia lists for your card as such both HP and nvidia consider it working normally and as designed.

 

if your card should exceed the listed thermal limit the card will then begin downclocking in small steps in order to keep thecard within the acceptable thermal limits

 

if you wish to lower the cards temps, tou can use a 3rd party application such as MSI Aferburner or EVGA's  Precision  X, or Rivaturner, all of the above allow you to manually control the fan curve and set it to ramp up in speed sooner and/or faster

 

they also allow you to downclock the card manually or reduse voltage to the gpu chip  both of these options require you to read the pargram docs before playing with these settings

 

a alterniative option is to remove the stock cooling featsink/fan and replace with a aftermarket cooler that has been reviewer and found to have better cooling (keep the original in case you need warranty service)


 

HP Recommended

Hi TheLamp,

 

I don't know what HP product you have. So I don't know what chassis fan upgrade options or adding additional fan options are available. Plus it is better to have motherboard PWM fans headers for better fan speed control.

 

You could add a fan controller which allows connecting additional fans but then you need SATA power and typically an open USB 2.0 header on the motherboard. This add in fan controller needs to talk to software provided by the vendor to control fan curves. For example, NZXT makes this product. CAM software is needed (provided by NZXT) to control the fans connected to the add in NZXT fan controller. There are other fan controller purchase options. You need the software provided by each prospective  vendor to control fan speeds.

 

I would think you need to move more air from the front of the chassis to the back or top of the chassis.

 

HP likes to use 92 mm fans. They are louder and don't move as much air as you may need to lower GPU temps.

 

And, it is possible the current fan/heatsink solution on the GPU may be inadequate. It may not be an easy fix if this is the case. Adding more chassis' fans may not solve the problem. Nvidia GPUs become unstable and will throttle at around 89 degrees Celsius. Your GPU thermals are hitting this point.

 

A good, local PC tech should be able to assist in getting GPU temps under control.

 

I have a 2080. It maxes at about 76 degrees Celsius when running some stress tests for at least 20 min or longer or running multiple loops. Stress tests used are: Superposition benchmark, Furmark, Heaven Benchmark, 3DMark Advanced Edition, and Final Fantasy XV benchmark.

 

Regards

 

 

HP Recommended

Well me and two others have had ours overheat to the point they have to me replaced just after a week of gaming. So....yeah poor design. Other pcs with these specs have up to 5 fans. This came with one. 

HP Recommended

This is a blower type RTX 2080 and it seems HP didn't do a good job with airflow on the case or a good job on the software managing the fan on the blower.  If you were going to download something like Precision X1 to manage the fan when running games how would you configure the fan speeds to ramp up with the temps raising on the GPU?  There are some preset aggressive and quiet settings, but the aggressive can be quite loud and I'm not sure if it's completely necessary.  Thanks so much.

† The opinions expressed above are the personal opinions of the authors, not of HP. By using this site, you accept the <a href="https://www8.hp.com/us/en/terms-of-use.html" class="udrlinesmall">Terms of Use</a> and <a href="/t5/custom/page/page-id/hp.rulespage" class="udrlinesmall"> Rules of Participation</a>.