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TomDz99
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Solved!

Re: HP Envy x360 Right Hinge Broken

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I have this same problem as well.  Laptop is only one month out of warranty.  What can I do? Located in Canada

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briflo1
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I posted about this problem with the HP Envy x360 hinge a month ago. Best Buy wouldn’t fix it for me, they said that they would have to take it and mail it into their repair center… but that it would then be returned in 2-3 months likely with a note that they have to replace the whole screen for $600+. I then took it to Ubreakifix, but they said they don’t do repairs like this. I’ve since been able to successfully repair the laptop on my own, thankfully! And it only cost $27. Read below for more details on how I did this.

 

I read another user’s comment on this thread that he used epoxy, so I did the same thing. I purchased Gorilla Glue two-part epoxy (about $7), and a laptop repair toolkit (about $20). I then used the tool to take off my screen. It’s important to check for the sticky pull tabs. You will not be able to separate the screen on the right and left with force, you need to first pull out the sticky pull tabs from the top right and left sides. They have a white tab on top with a hole in the middle to grab onto it with a pinching tool from the laptop repair kit. You have to first separate the screen on the top to be able to access them. Then pull them out. Do this part carefully and don’t let the sticky tab touch itself, since you won’t be able to get it back apart. I laid the two sticky tabs out on the table on top of a plastic bag that was taped down taught to the table. This kept the sticky tab straight to save for later.

 

Once the sticky tabs were off, the rest of the screen easily popped off. I laid down paper towel on top of the keypad so the screen could rest flat on it. I had to move a few of the wires out of the rivets so that the screen could extend further to lay down flat. Then I folded the metal shell to be flat down on the table. I extended the hinge to be flat and removed all the broken plastic shards from where the hinge separated from the shell. I put the screws back into the holes, even though the plastic was broken and I couldn’t screw them into everything. I figured it would provide more support to have the screws embedded within the epoxy. I then mixed the epoxy and then applied it liberally to the hinge area. I also applied to the left hinge, even though it was not broken, since I worried that hinge would also break eventually.

 

I placed a piece of plastic bag over the hinge and then clamped down the hinge for 24 hours. After that, I removed the clamp, replaced the sticky tabs, popped the screen back into place, and cautiously closed the screen. It was fixed! Closed smoothly and it is still working great a month later. I’m now much more cautious opening and closing the laptop, and I avoid flipping the screen all the way around to use as a tablet. I hope this helps someone out!

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briflo1
Level 1
3 3 1 3
Message 2 of 4
Flag Post
HP Recommended

I posted about this problem with the HP Envy x360 hinge a month ago. Best Buy wouldn’t fix it for me, they said that they would have to take it and mail it into their repair center… but that it would then be returned in 2-3 months likely with a note that they have to replace the whole screen for $600+. I then took it to Ubreakifix, but they said they don’t do repairs like this. I’ve since been able to successfully repair the laptop on my own, thankfully! And it only cost $27. Read below for more details on how I did this.

 

I read another user’s comment on this thread that he used epoxy, so I did the same thing. I purchased Gorilla Glue two-part epoxy (about $7), and a laptop repair toolkit (about $20). I then used the tool to take off my screen. It’s important to check for the sticky pull tabs. You will not be able to separate the screen on the right and left with force, you need to first pull out the sticky pull tabs from the top right and left sides. They have a white tab on top with a hole in the middle to grab onto it with a pinching tool from the laptop repair kit. You have to first separate the screen on the top to be able to access them. Then pull them out. Do this part carefully and don’t let the sticky tab touch itself, since you won’t be able to get it back apart. I laid the two sticky tabs out on the table on top of a plastic bag that was taped down taught to the table. This kept the sticky tab straight to save for later.

 

Once the sticky tabs were off, the rest of the screen easily popped off. I laid down paper towel on top of the keypad so the screen could rest flat on it. I had to move a few of the wires out of the rivets so that the screen could extend further to lay down flat. Then I folded the metal shell to be flat down on the table. I extended the hinge to be flat and removed all the broken plastic shards from where the hinge separated from the shell. I put the screws back into the holes, even though the plastic was broken and I couldn’t screw them into everything. I figured it would provide more support to have the screws embedded within the epoxy. I then mixed the epoxy and then applied it liberally to the hinge area. I also applied to the left hinge, even though it was not broken, since I worried that hinge would also break eventually.

 

I placed a piece of plastic bag over the hinge and then clamped down the hinge for 24 hours. After that, I removed the clamp, replaced the sticky tabs, popped the screen back into place, and cautiously closed the screen. It was fixed! Closed smoothly and it is still working great a month later. I’m now much more cautious opening and closing the laptop, and I avoid flipping the screen all the way around to use as a tablet. I hope this helps someone out!

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TomDz99
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Appreciate your detailed reply!

 

out of curiosity but did you call HP and request for them to repair the laptop, even out of warranty and at a cost?

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briflo1
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Yes, I started with calling HP and found them to be unhelpful. I initially requested for them to repair it and cover the costs, but they said that it's not possible for them to cover the repair costs. They said it would be about 2-4 months to repair the laptop, that I would have to mail it in, and the cost would be something over $400 (which was just an estimate). I didn't want to pay about 50% of the cost of buying a new laptop for this fix and be without a laptop for an unknown amount of time. It ended up being the right decision for me since the fix for me was only about $25. Hope this helps.

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