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Lincs Motherboard Compatibility

Pavilion 590-p0070
Microsoft Windows 10 (64-bit)

Does the Linc motherboard support NVMe memory. I bought Samsung 970, 250 Gb stick and can't seem to boot from it.

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See: HP Desktop PCs - motherboard specifications, Lincs

 

Expansion Slots

 

• One PCIe x16 socket
• One PCIe x1 socket
• One M.2 socket 1, 2230 type for WLAN
One M.2 socket 3, 2280 type for SSD

 

OK?

 

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Thank you for the reply.

 

I have seen that description of the slots and that is why I ordered the Samsung 970 M.2.

But since I can't get it to work, I question whether the motherboard (mb} supports NVMe.

 

Do you know if the mb supports NVMe?

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@mtmtmt wrote:

1. I have seen that description of the slots. That is why I ordered the Samsung 970 M.2

2. But since I can't get it to work ...

3. I question whether the motherboard (mb} supports NVMe.

4. Do you know if the mb supports NVMe?


1. It is good that we looked at the same web-page.

2. If you install Windows to an ordinary disk-drive, or to a SSD, and then open "Disk Manager", is the M.2 device listed as "not initialized" ?  Can you "initialize" it? Create a partition? Quick-format the partition?

3. I don't see anything on that web-page about NVMe, even though the motherboard is of current (2018) vintage.

4. I do not know, but based on my answer to #3, I would say NO.

 

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I wanted to update you and the community.

 

I had a PCIe adapter card that I mounted the NVMe drive on, changed the boot order in the BIOS and it booted fine from it.

 

Next, I put the NVMe M.2 on motherboard. After I went to Disk Management in Win10 and made the NVMe drive "online" and changed the boot order in the BIOS, it works fine.

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So that means you have to in addition buy a PCIe x4 adapter board ... and hope that that works because I want to use that x16 socket (only two on the 590-p0070 MB, a X1 and X16) for a video card ... correct? 

 

so to be sure - you installed the m.2 NVMe card on a PCIe adapter card, you must have then installed the SSD cards software for cloning to copy (image) the existing boot HD to the SSD ... then moved it over to the m.2 socket and changed the boot order? without putting words in your mouth - is this correct or was there more to it than this? I've TRIED to get support from HP - they've no clue whether or not the socket supports full 4 ch PCIe for an NVMe card. I'm considering the WD Black. 

 

Gary 

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Both of my drives were Samsung NVMe. The "free" Samsung Data Migration software moved the contents of the 1 Tb mechanical hard drive that came with the HP computer to the 250 Mb NVMe. It recognized the NVMe drive on the PCIe 4x adapter card. It also recognized the 500 Gb M.2 when installed on the motherboard. I can't speak to other manufactures software though.


I wasn't able to use the PCIe x1 slot at all. The card I had was PCIe x4, so I had to install it in the PCI x16 slot. I have no secondary Graphics card installed.

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Thank you for that response... now here's the big question ... I don't know enough about SSD socket design to know if this is true - however my guess is that it is - if the socket is designed to only support SATA transfer will the SSD card fall back to this? The only way to tell is to run some form of benchmark on the SSD ... maybe the maintanence program that came from the SSD manufacturer to confirm that it is running at the NVMe data rates OR running at a much slower rate (still faster than a mechanical HD so don't be fooled by this) ... have you run such a test and confirmed it is transferring data at the much higher speeds of NVMe and not as SATA?

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I ran benchmarks when I installed the drives to verify NVMe speeds. It is def. NVMe, not SSD,

Speeds were comparable whether the NVMe was on the mother board or the PCIe adapter. They 5-6 times what you would get from an SSD, but I no longer recall the exact numbers.

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Super - thanks. Have you run Latency Mon (LatencyMon) on your computer? It measures how well the system works for audio applications ... the results for this i7-8700 are worse then my Dell i5-4460 which really surprised me. Not sure if that is of any concern for you or not.

 

 

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