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Sewpar Top Student
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Re: High temperature on i7-8750h

Hello there! I'm using a quite new, maybe 3 week old HP Omen 15-dc0022na. I'm also having a bit of trouble with the CPU temps. I updated the BIOS and other drivers, didn't seem to fix the problem. When playing demanding, CPU intensive games such as Battlefront 2015 or The Witcher 3, my CPU reaches around 85-95 C, or sometimes higher, before it starts throttling. While I do agree with you that the CPU is really a beast and the laptop itself for me personally runs like a dream, I am a bit annoyed by these temperatures and I'm concerned that the CPU may not last long.

 

I also tried undervolting the CPU by -0.125V, which did help, but not much. Right now I'm trying out -0.14V undervolt to see if it's stable. I also tried getting a DeepCool N8 cooling pad, which did not help at all. I'm pretty sure that the high temperatures are caused by high clock speeds and the amount of power that the CPU is getting. I tried using ThrottleStop and came up with a solution. Not the best one but a solution nevertheless and it may help to other people with their i7-8750h's. If I'm not mistaken, the default Package Power Long and Package Power Short are 45W and 78W respectively (they may also be called Turbo Boost Power Max and Turbo Boost Short Power Max). Setting them both to lower values, for example, both to 30W, limits the power they're getting but also decreases temperatures. Instead of thermal throttling you'll be getting power limit throttling with lower clock speeds. While you will be getting lower performance, it's not that noticable. It may be more of a workaround than a solution but it's the only one that I found that would work for me personally.

 

 

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Re: High temperature on i7-8750h

Just a note:

 

Intel® Core™ i7-8750H Processor

 

8750H#1.PNG

 

https://ark.intel.com/products/134906/Intel-Core-i7-8750H-Processor-9M-Cache-up-to-4_10-GHz

 

T Junction =   100°C 

 

Tjunction Max is the maximum temperature the cores can reach before thermal throttling activates.

 

Processors have two modes of thermal protection, throttling and automatic shutdown. When a core exceeds the set throttle temperature, it will start to reduce power to bring the temperature back below that point.

 

Throttling and temperature is designed into the CPU by INTEL.

 

REO

If you need further assistance please start a new post as I no longer will be a part of the HP Support Community.
Sewpar Top Student
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Re: High temperature on i7-8750h

Hey there, thanks for answering. So does this mean that such high temperatures while under load are normal for a gaming laptop? Should I be worried? Will this impact CPU lifespan?

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Associate Professor
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Re: High temperature on i7-8750h

I have a ZBook Studio x360 G5 with a Xeon E-2186M - that's the Xeon version of the Core i9-8950HK which is the top processor in this particular series. These processors run hot at full load. As @REO51ST notes, T(junction) is 100°C, which is the hard limit for processor die temperature. If that limit is hit, the processor will throttle to drop its temperature. Further, these processors have fairly sophisticated dynamic power and temperature management.

 

We are asking a lot of these devices; 6 cores with 12 threads in a 45W Thermal Design Power package with only a relatively small notebook cooling solution is a demanding setup. Both your system and mine have a dedicated GPU on the same cooling system.

 

 

I am perhaps less worried that you about longevity; I have a five year warranty on a mobile workstation that should be designed for heavy professional workloads. If my processor fails in normal use then HP will have to replace my system board under warranty. Moreover, the system should be designed with thermal and power limits that prevent hardware damage. I suspect HP will have tuned things slightly on the conservative side rather than for all-out performance.

 

 

Cautious undervolting is perhaps an option, but you have to remember that you are running hardware out of specification by undervolting. Don't be surprised if stability suffers when undervolting; if you start to get unexpected blue screens, move the voltage offset back towards 0.00 (i.e. stock voltage).

Sewpar Top Student
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Re: High temperature on i7-8750h

Thank you very much for your input. It feels like undervolting is a neccessity for these kind of CPUs. It's a shame that I have to limit the power if I want to have comfortable temperatures and not worry about the lifespan of my laptop. But I also don't feel like holding back my CPU just to get decent temperatures so I besides the undervolt I suppose I'll just stick with default settings.

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Re: High temperature on i7-8750h

@Sewpar

 

I can understand your concerns of overheating.

 

Overheating is the quickest way to destroy any laptop  or  desktop.

 

The only other thing you may consider is to replace your thermal past 2x a year.

 

At the same time make sure to use some canned air to clean up the dust bunnies.

 

OMEN by HP 15-dc0000 Laptop PC - FRU Remove/Replace Videos

 

https://h20574.www2.hp.com/results.htm?SID=1009924123&MEID=0139DD6B-26E5-4FA8-A64C-1F2F13CF8914

 

REO

 

Just a question: Do you notice more heat coming from one of the two exhaust fans on the rear of the laptop???

If you need further assistance please start a new post as I no longer will be a part of the HP Support Community.
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Re: High temperature on i7-8750h

Thanks for your reply. I might bring it in for service some other time, as I'm still covered by the warranty. Don't feel like doing that kind of stuff by myself. And to answer your question, sometimes it FEELS like, when viewing from my perspective while using the laptop, that the left side is blowing more air than the right one, but I'm not totally sure on that, sorry.

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Re: High temperature on i7-8750h

Thermal throttling starts before Tjunction Max, Tjunction Max is where it simply shutts down. I get noticable performance reducing throttling when I'm above 90 degress Celcius.

 

I've pretty much tried everything that I can on my computer that does not cancell the warrany, including severe undervolting, but the only thing that made the temperatures stay put was to shut off the turbu boost which instead limits the performance.

 

I've been in contact with the HP support and according to what they've told me the temperatures on my specific modell should never exceed 95 degress celcius.

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Re: High temperature on i7-8750h


@MsKO wrote:

Thermal throttling starts before Tjunction Max, Tjunction Max is where it simply shutts down. I get noticable performance reducing throttling when I'm above 90 degress Celcius.

 

I've pretty much tried everything that I can on my computer that does not cancell the warrany, including severe undervolting, but the only thing that made the temperatures stay put was to shut off the turbu boost which instead limits the performance.

 

I've been in contact with the HP support and according to what they've told me the temperatures on my specific modell should never exceed 95 degress celcius.


I agree that throttling starts before the T(junction) limit is reached. At that point, the processor steps in and seems to throttle the hot core(s) quite aggressively. I think there is a higher, unpublished limit where the device shuts down automatically to prevent hardware damage. I have seen a core on my machine hit 99°C and throttle back aggressively.

 

 

There's three underlying principles in operation in the default mode. There is a "Turbo Boost Short Power Max", which allows very brief excursions on my system up to 60W. There is then the regular "Turbo Boost Power Max" which allows Turbo for up to the "Turbo Boost Power Time Window" - on my system the window is 28 seconds and the maximum power appears to adjust dynamically. As well as these power limits there is thermal throttling that rolls off the available clock speed the closer the processor gets to the T(junction) limit.

 

Intel went for some very aggressive turbo settings on Coffee Lake. The headline speed of my processor is 2.9GHz. The default turbo settings allow 1 core at up to 4.8GHz, 2 cores at up to 4.8GHz, 3 cores at up to 4.7GHz, 4 cores at up to 4.5 GHz, 5 cores at up to 4.4GHz and 6 cores at up to 4.3GHz. It stands to reason that this much turbo is going to make things hot! Unfortunately those settings are locked either by my processor or the HP BIOS (I suspect you might need a i9-8950HK for them to be unlocked). I would love to experiment with cutting the turbo speeds somewhat to trade a little performance for lower temperatures without having to undervolt or turn off turbo altogether. Perhaps the answer is to cut the "Turbo Boost Power Time Window" - it is less aggressive than turning off turbo altogether but will cut the amount of turbo on heavy workloads.

 

Ultimately I think Intel intended us to trust in the dynamic power limit for the regular turbo, which on my system makes full use of the available thermal range up to the T(junction) limit.

Sewpar Top Student
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Re: High temperature on i7-8750h

I have an update. With less than a month of warranty left, I finally decided to change the thermal paste for the CPU and GPU myself. Upon disassembly, I found the old thermal paste dried up and poorly applied, to nobody's surprise. I used Arctic MX-4 thermal paste and now the temperatures are better, they seem to have dropped by 5-10 Celsius. I still seem to get thermal throttling when doing intensive stuff and the laptop still gets hot after a while of intensive work but the temperatures seem to be lower nevertheless.

 

In short, the best solution for me personally is to undervolt the CPU with ThrottleStop (-0.125V for both CPU Core and CPU Cache), replace the thermal paste with higher quality paste (I used Arctic MX-4), and, optionally, enable Comfort Mode under Performance control in the HP Omen Command Center.

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